Miscellaneous Alpine County Settlement Descriptions

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Miscellaneous Settlement Descriptions
From the Richard N. Schellens Collection of Historical Materials Vol. 71 – Section 16, Other Counties (Alpine-Vol. 6)
Donated by Walter Castor
Transcribed by Elizabeth E. Bullard-Watson (2006)

Alpine County (Gudde):
Formed and named by act of the legislature 06 Mar 1864 from parts of Amador, El Dorado, Calevaras, and Tuolumne Counties.

Carey’s Mills (Utah Record):
Carey’s Mills was first establised on 01 Jul 1858 in Carson County, Utah Territory.

Centreville (Hoover):
Centreville, on the East Carson River, at the junction of the L.A.-Lake Tahoe highway and the highway from Angels Camp, is only a lingering memory, with only some mining scars remaining. (handwritten note: This is probably Centerville, Nevada from the description, but it is possible that the original town was in California – perhaps at Fredericksburg.)

Diamond Hill (Hoover):
“… on the Ebbet’s Pass road…”

Foy Camp
Shown on (illegible) oil map, near Silver Creek.

Fredericksburg (Gudde):
The town was started in 1864 and may have been named for Frederick Frevert, who operated a sawmill nearby. In view of the strong Confederate sentiment in this region, the (illegible) of Burnside’s defeat at Fredericksburg, Virginia may have had something to do with the naming. The battle took place in December 1862.

Fredericksburg (1915 Bradstreet):
Post office at Woodfords, 11 miles to (illegible), Nevada.

Grover’s Hot Springs (handwritten note):
See under Markleeville 1886/7 list: A.M.G. propr Hot Springs Hotel.

Markleeville (Gudde):
The post office was established in 1864 and was named for Jacob J. Marklee, a settler here in 1861, who was later killed in a quarrel over the land on which the town was built. The site of his cabin is Historic Landmark 240.

Markleeville (WPA):
In a high mountain valley on an early immigration route, it was settled in the 1850’s. It later furnished timber for the mines of the Comstock Lode.

Markleeville (1915 Bradstreet):
County seat. Stage from Minden, Nev. 22 mi. Pop. 150. Post office. Express at Minden (NV); telegr and banking at Carson City (NV), 38 mi.
John Ellis, hotel
J. E. Mayo, genl store

Mogul (Hoover):
Four miles north of Monitor.

Monitor (C(illegible) Atlas):
5 miles below Silver Creek on stage road to Coleville, Mono County.

Monitor (Hoover):
Flourishing from 1859 to 1886 and entirely deserted by 1893, showed some return to activity from 1898 to 1911, when it was again deserted until 1930.

Monitor (CSAA Map):
Shown on Route 89 about 2 miles east of Markleeville – silver road.

Picketts (Gudde):
Pickett Peak recalls an early stage station, Pickett Place, which was near the peak and was named for Edward M. Pickett.

Silver King (Hoover):
Located on the headwaters of the East Carson River near the L.A.-Lake Tahoe highway.

Silver Mountain (Gudde):
The word ‘silver’ is found in the names of more than 75 physical features in California. A number of these, including the peak, creek, valley and the old mining towns of Silver Mountain and Silver King in Alpine County, were named for the occurrence of silver ore.

Silver Mountain (Hoover):
Silver Mountain, founded 1858 by Scandinavian miners existed until 1886. The county seat was located here from 1864 to 1875 (see old stone jail near the site of the old courthouse).

Woodfords (Gudde):
Known first as Carey’s Mill for John Carey, who established a sawmill here in 1853 or 1854. When Daniel Woodford became owner of the mill in 1869, the name was changed to Woodfords and this name was adopted by the post office dept.

 

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