Lake County, California


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A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


"A"

ALEXANDER, David

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, pg. 215

Was born in Pennsylvania March 15, 1830. When he was eighteen years of age he went to Ohio and engaged in the milling business for four years. He then returned to his native State and engaged in farming until 1855, when he came to California via Nicaragua, arriving at San Francisco May 10th. He engaged in mining, which he followed at different places until 1863, when he went to Humboldt County and followed staging for one year. A year was then spent in Nevada, engaged in prospecting. In 1865 he returned to Nevada County, California, and followed mining for eleven years. In 1876 he came to Lake County and leased the Bartlett Springs property, which he conducted until the spring of 1881. He was married December 30, 1866, to Mrs. Pauline Twiggs, a native of Missouri. She has, by her first marriage, one son, Milton E.



ALLEN, Hiram

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Wood County, Ohio, January 21, 1822. When eleven years of age he engaged as clerk in a commission house in Erie County, which occupation he followed until 1849, when he crossed the plains with mule teams to California, and arrived at Placerville September 12th of the above year. After mining for one year we find Mr. Allen engaged in clerking in Jackson, Amador County, which he followed one year. He then returned via Nicaragua, to the East, where he remained until 1853, when he again crossed the plains, bringing with him this time his wife. After a slow and tedious journey Jackson, Amador County, was reached October 12, 1856. Here he engaged in hotel-keeping and other occupations until 1861, when he came to Lake County and located at Lakeport, where he conducted a livery and feed stable for a few months, after which he engaged in farming for three years. We next find him in Sutter County, where one year was spent, when he returned to Lake County and engaged in farming in Bg Valley, which he followed for two years. In 1866 he settled at Lower Lake, and in 1871 was elected Assessor, which office he held for eight years. He next engaged in merchandising at Lower Lake, which he followed until the spring of 1881, when he sold his stock to H. R. Bolter. Mr. Allen married, February 15, 1849, Miss Henrietta M. Bill. Their children are, Fannie C., Maria J. and Mollie. They have lost Seneca, Mary C. and Nellie.



ALTER, Isaac

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

This worthy pioneer of Lake County was born in Pennsylvania, March 5, 1821.   Here the boy grew up and reached manhood's estate, receiving, in the meantime, a very liberal education.  At the early age of nineteen he sundered the ties which bound him to his boyhood's home, and bade a long farewell to the dear associations of the happy days of his youth. Striking out boldly for himself at this time, he pushed westward into the State of Ohio, which was then in the rude condition of pioneerism. Here the youthful adventurer engaged in school teaching in winter and farming in summer, until 1846. Again the spirit of unrest came over him, and he pushed one step farther into the great and nearly boundless empire of the then almost unknown West, taking up his residence in Indiana. Here he followed farming for the next four years, when the old desire came upon him to follow up the star of empire, and another step westward was made. This time he planted the stakes of his tent on the broad and fertile prairies of Iowa, where he again engaged in farming which he followed until the spring of 1852. Long had he heard the marvelous stories concerning this wonderful land of gold-California, and long had he withstood the almost consuming desire to be himself among the band of hardy pioneers, who were destined to change the wilds of nature into the blooming gardens of civilization, and at this time he fully resolved to push across the plains and reach this wonderful Mecca, concerning which such goodly reports continued to fill the air. Accordingly in the spring of 1852 he made the necessary arrangements for the long and tedious, as well as dangerous trip across the plains, and set sail in a "prairie schooner" for the land of gold. After quite a wearisome, though comparatively expeditious journey, he arrived at the Indiana diggings, in El Dorado County, August 26th of that year. Once arrived in the State he bagan mining, and continued this occupation in connection with hotel-keeping for the following two years. In 1854 we find that he purchased a farm in the same county, and that he moved upon it and prosecuted that occupation until August, 1858. He then began casting about for a suitable place to make for himself and family an enduring abiding place, and fortunate circumstances directed his steps to Lake County. After viewing it over he decided to locate in a lovely and well sheltered little dale on the northern side of that most lovely sheet of water, Clear Lake, which he has so very appropriately designated by the name of Paradise Valley. Here he has a beautiful home, and is surrounded with all that goes to make up the sum of human happiness during his earthly existence. His fine farm consists of five hundred acres of excellent land, and he devotes his attention to farming and wool growing. His son Henry has a beautiful steam yacht that he built himself, which brings them into easy communication with the outside world at any point on the lake, and his charming place is the surprise and admiration of all who pass by or visit it. Mr. Alter is one of those solid, substantial citizens who are the very bone and sinew of a new country, and his vast experience in pioneer life well fits him for assuming the duties of a citizen in any new country. He was united in marriage, February 3, 1842, with Miss Catharine Brundridge, a native of New York, and by this union they have one son, Henry.




Middletown Independent, December 12, 1896
(Taken from the National Recorder, Washington, D. C.)
Issac Alter of Lakeport, Cal is now in his 75th year but has just been awarded a silver medal for his excellent invention of a spring mattress. He comes of Pennsylvannia Dutch Stock, and was born in Washington County, in the Keystone state March 5, 1821. He removed to Wayne Co. Ohio, while still a young man, and taught school several terms. He has seemed all his life to enjoy the life of the pioneer frontiersman. He was an Ohio and Indiana pioneer, and in 1852, he crossed the plains with an ox team to California. Mr. Alter has been a resident of Lake County for thirty-eight years, and has seen the country grow up from a Wilderness to be the paradise of Califonia. Mr. Alter has also been an inventive turn of the mind and has given some attention to the great problems of continuous motive power, which he expects still to completely develop.



ARMSTRONG, C. W.

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Washington Territory. November 5, 1858. He resided on a farm with his parents during which time he received his primary education at Vancouver. In the year 1869 he came with his parents to California, and spent the following winter in Tehama County. In the spring of 1870 they went to Chico, Butte County, where the subject of this sketch attended the High School. Moved to Lower Lake, Lake County, the following year after which he spent a few months in a printing office. He then began the drug business in the store of F. Delmont, where he continued for several yars. Afterwards became manager for J. Ivancovich. He then came to Middletown, and spent the summer of 1875 in brickmaking with his father. His father then bought the Pioneer Drug Store of Messrs. Whiting & Smith, then the son took the management of it. In June 1878, The business was sold to William Amesberry, Charles still remaining manager. The business has rapidly improved under his ownership, and is now very propserous. In March 1879 he became manager of the telegraph office at Middletown, and still retains this position. He was married August 71878 to Miss Amanda M. Poulson, a native of Napa County and they have one bright little girl, Evalina, born June 16, 1879.



ARNOLD, MARSHALL


From "Memorial and Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Company, 1891

MARSHALL ARNOLD, Cashier of the Bank of Lake at Lakeport, was born in St. Lawrence County, New York, March 24, 1856, educated in St. Lawrence University at Canton, New York, and graduated at the Hastings College of Law in May, 1882, and during the next two years was engaged in surveying.  In 1884 he was elected to his present position.  He was married in December, 1883, to Miss M.A. Castlio, and has one child, a daughter.  Mr. Arnold is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is now (April, 1890) Master of Hartley Lodge, No. 199; he is also treasurer of Lakeport Lodge, No. 351, I.O.O.F.

Transcribed by:  Betty Wilson, August 2004  ©


ASHLEY, Joel G.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Pennsylvania August 2, 1831. When he was six years of age he, with his grandfather, moved to Wisconsin, where thirteen years were spent. While here he learned the carpenter's trade. In 1850 he came to California, and spent about four years in the mines; then engaged in butchering, which he followed at different places until 1860. He then went to the Humboldt Mines in Nevada, where mining was followed for about two years. We next find Mr. Ashley engaged in butchering in Folsom, Sacramento County, for about one year. He then engaged in carpentering at Colfax, Placer County, until 1869, when he came to Lake County. After residing on rented farms for about four years, he settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and seventy-eight acres, located about seven and one-half miles south of Lower Lake. Here he is engaged in farming and wool growing. Mr. Ashley married January 1, 1860, Miss Catherine S. Whiteside, a native of Illinois. They have four living children: William I., Alice M., Charles R., and Ida M., and have lost one, David B.




"B"

BALLINGER, William


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 218

Was born in South Carolina, November 22, 1823. When twelve years of age his parents moved to Boone County, Missouri, and settled on a farm. The subject of this sketch resided with his parents until 1857, when he "came the plains across" with ox-teams, arriving in Placer County September 15th of the above year. After a rest of a few days he continued on his journey to Sonoma County and located on a farm near Healdsburg. Here he followed farming until the fall of 1870, when he came to Lake County and settled in Big Valley, where he resided about eighteen months, after which he settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and twenty-three acres, located in Bachelor Valley, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. Ballinger married, February 18, 1847, Miss Elizabeth A. Payne, a native of Missouri. Their children are, Mary J., Laura C., Susan F., Julia A., Celia I., Alice E., and Hattie L.



BARTLETT, Greene

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

This worthy gentleman, whose portrait will be found in the body of this work, was born in Louisville, Kentucky, October 2, 1835. When he was but a child his parents moved to Hot Springs, Arkansas. Here the subject of this sketch resided on a farm until 1856, when he crossed the plains to California, bringing a drove of cattle. He arrived in the fall of that year, and spent the time till 1858 in Solano County. He then returned via Panama to the East, and in 1859 he again crossed the plains, bringing a drove of cattle as far as Salt Lake City, where he sold them, and then came to California, bringing a few mules. He then purchased a band of sheep, and in July, 1860, settled in Berryessa Valley, Napa County. While here he did his own herding, and contracted the rheumatism so badly that he was obliged to go to the mountains for his health. In June, 1870, while hunting and camping, he happened to discover the wonderful medicinal and healing qualities of the water in what is now known at the Bartlett Spring, by the effect it produced upon him. He at once located one hundred and sixty acres of land on which the spring is situated, and has since made that place his home.




BASSETT, William D.

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 216

Was born in Ohio February 4, 1842. Here farming was prosecuted until 1853, when, with his parents, he came to California. They crossed the plains with ox-teams, and arrived in Tehama County in October of the above year. Farming was followed in that county for three years, after which they moved to Sonoma County, and resided near Santa Rosa until July, 1858, when they came to Lake County, and settled about four miles south from Middletown. Here they resided until 1867, when they bought what is known as Glenbrook, in Cobb Valley, where they are engaged in farming and stock raising, as well as keeping a summer resort.

BASSETT, William D.

From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

William D. Bassett, a farmer three miles south of Lakeport, is a native of Ohio, born in Coshocton, February 4, 1840; his parents were natives of New York State, from whence they emigrated in an early day to Ohio. Here Wm. D. received his education in the public schools. In 1853 they again started westward, crossing the plains with ox teams to California. They first settled in Tehama County, where they engaged in farming four years. They then removed to Sonoma County, where they remained about one year. In 1858 they came to Napa County and settled near where the Bradford mine is now located, where they were engaged in stock-raising for nine years. In 1867 they bought a ranch named Glenbrook, where the father, mother and brother now reside. In 1884 William D. bought 160 acres, three miles south of Lakeport, where he now lives and has a beautiful home. His products are grain, hay and stock. He has a fine residence and barn, a large orchard of bearing fruit trees and good improvements throughout.
He was married June 16, 1887, to Miss Nancy Millikan, a daughter of Henry and Rachel Millikan, natives of Indiana. They have one child, William Cornelius. Politically, Mr. Bassett is a stanch Republican.

Transcribed by Kathy Sedler


BOARDMAN, Wilfred L.

From "History of Mendocino and Lake Counties, California" 1914

The beautiful country home of Wilfred L. Boardman in West Upper Lake precinct. Lake county, a valuable tract of forty acres, was once part of the large estate of Judge George A. Lyon, Mrs. Boardman's father, one of the old-time residents of this locality. Mr. Boardman has been engaged in agricultural pursuits here for the last few years, making a specialty of market gardening and fruit growing, and besides cultivating his home place he rents two hundred acres in the vicinity, operating on an extensive scale. His property lies on the west shore of Clear lake, five miles southwest of the town of Upper Lake, and for location as well as improvements is considered one of the most desirable tracts in that section. Though Mr. Boardman has occupied it only since 1911 he has accomplished some noteworthy improvements, working out a number of ideas which have already produced good results and promise more.
Mr. Boardman was born July 9, 1878, at Lakeport, and is the eldest son of Oscar T. Boardman, whose reputation as an educator extends all over Lake county. He has followed the profession of teacher successfully for forty years, and now, at the age of sixty-three, is thus engaged in the Hawaiian Islands, where he also has valuable property holdings. He and his wife, whose maiden name was Viola Lapham, came to California from Wisconsin, where she was born ; she joined him in this state, and died at Kelseyville. She is buried at Lakeport. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. O. T. Boardman : Wilfred L., George P. and Otis B., farmers, living in Washington ; and Eva S., who is teaching in the Hawaiian Islands.
Wilfred L. Boardman grew up in Lake county, obtained his early education in the public schools, and then had the advantages of two years' attendance at Lakeport academy. Agriculture has always been his chosen vocation. For a time he was in the stock business, beginning by renting a ranch in Big valley, Lake county, in the Highland Springs district, which he operated for a period of ten years. In 1909 he and his wife went to the Hawaiian Islands, where his father is established, and for two years he was engaged as foreman of a large pineapple plantation. Returning to Lake county in 1911 he bought the forty-acre tract previously mentioned, where he has since been engaged in truck farming and fruit raising, particularly profitable lines when the marketing and production can both be managed satisfactorily. He also rents two hundred acres, and he keeps two men busy besides himself attending to the general work, which involves many important details if all the advantages of close attention are to be observed. Mr. Boardman maintains a persistency of interest which is bound to make his enterprises go through, and he is thoroughly progressive about trying new methods as well as improving on old ones. Active mentally and physically, he has the bearing of self-reliance and intelligence which wins confidence wherever he goes, and he well deserves the esteem in which he is held. He is fair in all his transactions, and he has the ability to carry out his plans and the patience to mature them properly, looking ahead toward the ultimate good of his interests rather than immediate profits.
In 1906 Mr. Boardman married Miss Roberta Lyon, the youngest daughter but one of the late Judge George A. Lyon, of Lake county, and they have one child, Glenyth. Mrs. Boardman is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Upper Lake. On political questions Mr. Boardman is heartily in sympathy with the doctrines of the Progressive party.


BOGGS,Henry C.

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

The subject of this sketch was born in Jackson County, Missouri, June 1, 1820, and is the second son of ex-Governor Boggs of that State. He remained in his native State until 1850, receiving in the meantime his education, and being engaged in farming. In May of that year he set out with his family across the plains for California, arriving in Sacramento August 20th of the same year.
He proceeded at once to Napa County, and settled about six miles north west of Napa, where he engaged in farming. In 1864 he came to Lake County and purchased land in Big Valley, and from this time on till 1869, he divided his attention between the two counties, as he had interests in both of them.
In the last named year he returned to Missouri, spending the summer in that State and New York, and in the fall he returned to California. In the spring of 1870 he located permanently in Lake County, making Lakeport his home, and has since resided at that place. In 1878 he was elected a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. He is president of the Farmers Savings Bank of Lakeport.
Mr. Boggs is one of those quiet, unassuming gentlemen of whom the world at large hears but little, but who, though his energies and strict attention to business, and to the advancement of the best interest of the community in which he resides, has made his presence felt, and in no feeble manner, either, Such men, and not the noisy ones, are the people who build up a community and add much to its material prosperity. Mr. Boggs was united in marriage October 13, 1840 with Miss Martha J. Young, a native of Kentucky. They have two children living, James W. and Lilburn H., and have lost one, Julia L., wife of W. W. Pendegast.



BOGGS, J. W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 222

Was born in Jackson County, Missouri, August 10, 1843. When he was six years of age he came to California with his parents, arriving at Sacramento in August, 1850. After spending a few months in Sonoma County, the family settled in Napa County. In 1858 the subject of this sketch entered the Collegiate Institute at Benicia, which he attended until 1861. In 1872 he went to the Esmeralda District, where he was employed in a quartz mill for four months. He then returned to Napa and remained there till July, 1864, when he came to Lake and took charge of his father's ranch. In 1868 he returned to Napa and had charge of his father's farm. In 1869 he returned to Lake County and settled on his present place, about five miles south of Lakeport, where he is engaged in farming. He was married, July 19, 1870, to Miss Josephine Boggs, a native of Missouri.



BOLE, E. B.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 220

Was born in Morgan County, Ohio, June 12, 1825. When eleven years of age he, with his parents, moved to Elkhart County, Indiana, where they followed farming. In 1852 the subject of this sketch crossed the plains with ox-teams to California, arriving at Placerville August 15th of the above year. The first three months after his arrival were spent in mining, after which he settled on a farm on the Cosumnes River, in Sacramento County. Here he farmed until February, 1858, when he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, located about two miles south from Kelseyville, in Big Valley, where he is engaged in the nursery and fruit business. Mr. Bole married November 12, 1846, Miss Phoebe D. Corpe, by whom he had three children, Emma A., Henry W. and Newton S., of which the two last-named are dead. He married, secondly, August 22, 1858, Miss Mary J. Hammack, a native of Missouri. They have five living children: Albert G., Harriet A., Mary E., Frances A., and Martha J., and have lost one, Willie.



BOLTER, H. R.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 219

Was born in Oneida County, New York, May 17, 1825. Here he attended school until 1844, when he went to Iowa, where about four months were spent. He next went to Missouri, where he taught school one term and then returned to Iowa. The following two years were spent at clerking in a store. We next find Mr. Bolter in New Orleans, where he remained one winter and then again returned to Iowa. In the spring of 1849 he started across the plains for California, and, after a long, tedious trip with ox-teams, arrived at Sacramento in September of the above year. The succeeding eleven years were spent in mining at different places, and in June, 1860, he came to Lake County, where he has since resided. He first located in what is known as Cold Valley, where he followed farming and stock raising until the fall of 1880. At that date he sold out and returned East on a visit, where he remained about five months; then returned to Lake County, and is at present engaged in general merchandising at Lower Lake.



BOND, Henry


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 219

Was born in England March 12, 1832. In 1848 he immigrated to New York and engaged in farming until 1854, when he came via Nicaragua to California, and arrived at San Francisco April 1st of the above year. Mr. Bond went at once to Mormon Island, where he followed mining for three years. In 1859 he came to Lake County and located in Coyote Valley, where he followed stock raising until 1860, when he settled on his present place, consisting of one thousand acres, located in Morgan Valley, where he is engaged in stock raising and wool growing. He was married, June 20, 1860, to Miss Martha Capps, by whom he has two children: John and Joseph. He married secondly, February 21, 1871, Miss Mary Gentry. By this marriage there are four children: Mary, Frank, Mattie and Maud I.



BOWER, Jacob


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 217-218

Was born in Stockstadt, Bavaria, Germany, on the river Main, March 31, 1821. When eleven years of age he, with parents, moved to Maryland, and after three years settled in Knox County, Illinois. Here farming was followed until 1843, when they took up their abode in Iowa. In 1847 the subject of this sketch crossed the plains to Oregon. Here he spent eighteen months on the Columbia River, part of the time in the employ of a Columbia River bar pilot. In April, 1849, Mr. Bower came to California and engaged in mining until 1853, when he engaged in dairying near Smiths Flat, Sierra County. This he followed until 1855, when a change was made to stock raising and farming, which has continued until 1881. In 1857 he came to Napa County and settled where Lower Lake wharf landing stands, but was driven away from there by the Clear Lake Water Company's dam of 1867 and 1868. In 1867 he settled on his present place, consisting of four hundred and eighty acres, located in Burns Valley. He also owns about three hundred acres at the Lower Lake landing. Mr. Bower married, March 9, 1855, Miss Clarinda Thomas, a native of Illinois, by whom he has two living children, Henry T. and Allen V., and has lost two, Sophia and Ada F.



BRITT, E. W.

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 217

Was born in Cass County, Missouri, December 25, 1855. He received his education at the North Missouri State Normal School, and at the Missouri University at Columbia. In December, 1877, at the age of twenty-two, he began the study of law at Harrisonville, the county seat of his native county, in the office of Messrs. Wooldridge & Daniel, and was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of Missouri in April, 1878. In the same month he came to California, and to Lake County in May following. Here he entered into partnership with Hon. S. K. Welch, where he has since been engaged in the practice of his profession. Mr. Britt is an exceptionally close student, and by strict attention to his work in hand has built for himself a reputation that is second to none in Lake County. A very prominent attorney once remarked to us that Mr. Britt came the nearest to being a natural born lawyer of any man he had ever met, and we are sure that he but stated the truth which is observed by all who are brought into contact with him.



BROWN, James W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 222

Was born in North Carolina, September 16, 1832. When but a child he, with his parents, moved to West Tennessee, where they followed cotton growing until 1841, when they moved to Missouri. Here the subject of this sketch followed farming and lead mining until 1857, when he crossed the plains to California, arriving in Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, in October of that year. Two years were spent near Petaluma, engaged in dairying, after which he followed the same business the same length of time near the mouth of Russian River. In May, 1862, he made a trip to Salmon River, but on account of sickness stayed but a short time. Returning he settled near Santa Rosa, and engaged in farming for a while. We next find Mr. Brown in Sebastapol, engaged in the livery business, which he conducted for four years. In 1867 he bought a ranch near Blucher Valley, and farmed until 1870, when he came to Lake County, where he has since resided. He is engaged in farming, about three miles south from Lower Lake. He married December 21, 1864, Miss Sarah J. Wood. Their children are, Harry, Joseph W., Charles W., James T., Walter M., Frank, and Mattie E.



BUCKNELL, George


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Is a native of England, and was born February 13, 1813. When twenty years of age he came to America and spent the first three years in Michigan, being engaged in farming. We next find him in the Rocky Mountains, where he spent two years trapping and hunting. He then settled on the frontier of Missouri, where he followed farming until 1849, when he crossed the plains to California, and settled at Stockton, where he engaged in stock raising until October, 1855, when he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of three hundred and twenty acres, located near Upper Lake, where he still resides, being engaged in farming. About three months of every year he spends in hunting deer and beaver in the Klamath Mountains in Siskiyou County. Mr. Bucknell married in September, 1838, Miss Mary Clemens, who died in 1843, leaving four children: Caroline, Henry, Charles and George. He married secondly, in 1844, Miss Frances Maxwell, who died in 1862, leaving ten children: Robert, Frances, Sarah, Virginia, Edward, Margaret A., Lewis W., Lucy, Thomas and James. He has lost seven: Henry, Charles, Thomas, Margaret A., Lewis W., Lucy and James.



BURGER, J. F.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 220

Was born in Warren County, Tennessee, August 4, 1825. When about three years of age he, with his parents, moved to Missouri. In 1847 the subject of this sketch went to Iowa, where he engaged in farming, which he followed until the spring of 1850, when he started across the plains for California, arriving at Placerville August 10th of the above year. He engaged at once in mining, which he followed until February, 1852, when he returned via Nicaragua to Iowa, and the following season again crossed the plains with a drove of cattle. He kept his cattle in Solano County until the spring of 1853, when he sold them and again returned East via Nicaragua. He remained this time in Iowa and Missouri until 1856, when he once more crossed the plains with a drove of cattle. On arriving he bought a ranch in Napa County known as "Atlas Peak," where he resided until 1858, when he sold his stock and ranch, and moved to Solano County and settled in Suisun Valley, where he followed farming one year. He then, in 1859, went to Oregon, where he resided about fourteen months. We next find Mr. Burger again in Solano County, engaged in farming, which he continued until October, 1863, when he came to Lake County, where he has since resided, being engaged in farming and dealing in stock. He married in February, 1850, Miss Sarah A. Reynolds, who died in February, 1852, leaving one child, Ephraim. He married, secondly, February 19, 1854, Mrs. Maria Nostrich, by whom he has four living children: George F., Mary A., Evaline, and James C. They have lost one, John T.



BURKE, W. P.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 221

Was born in Gentry County, Missouri, July 29, 1850. In 1854 his parents crossed the plains to California. After spending about five years in the mines in Tuolumne County, they moved to Santa Cruz County, where three years were spent in farming. In the fall of 1862 they came to Lake County, rented land for two years, and then settled in Bachelor Valley, where the father still lives, being engaged in farming. In 1867 the subject of this sketch began farming on his own account in Bachelor Valley, where he resided until the fall of 1880, when he settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, located about two and one-half miles west from Lakeport, where he is engaged in company with D. V. Conner in wool growing. Mr. Burke is a strong believer in the doctrine of Seventh Day Adventists, especially in the observance of the seventh day of the week as the Sabbath. He thinks labor honorable and work ennobling. Was married March 7, 1867, to Miss Massena A. Reese, a native of Texas.



BURTNETT, Peter


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 218

The subject of this sketch, whose portrait will be found in the body of this work, was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, March 20, 1822. His mother died when he was quite young, and he resided at his birthplace with his father until 1840, when he, leaving his father, went to Richland County, same State, where he learned the millwright's trade. In 1842 he went to Knox County, Illinois, where he worked at his trade for seven years. He then filled the office of deputy sheriff and sheriff alternately, until 1860. He then came overland with horse and ox-teams to California, arriving in Napa County September 22d of that year. He at once engaged in his former occupation in connection with farming, which he followed until 1867. He then moved to Lake County and located about two and one-half miles from Kelseyville, where he built a flouring mill for other parties, but he finally bought them out and still owns the mill, it being under the management of his son, Charles G. In the fall of 1879, the subject of this sketch was elected to the office of Sheriff on the Republican ticket, which position he still holds. This fact alone is a fair indication of Mr. Burtnett's popularity in the county in which he resides, as it is Democratic by quite a large majority. In March, 1880, he moved to Lakeport, where he at present resides. While living in Napa County he was honored with the office of Supervisor for five years, and is well and favorably known all over the county. Mr. Burtnett was married March 20, 1843, to Miss Christiana Speck, a native of Ohio. They have five living children: William C., Sarah, Marvin L., Charles G., and Emma L., and one adopted daughter. They have lost one, Annie.



BUTLER, S. J.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 217

Was born in Pennsylvania, August 29, 1830. Here he resided on a farm with his parents until 1854, when, with his family, consisting of wife and one child, he moved to Hamilton County, Iowa. Here he followed farming until 1869, when he came to California and settled in Coyote Valley, where he followed farming for one year. He then moved into Loconoma Valley, about one and one-half miles from Middletown, where he still resides, being engaged in farming. Mr. Butler married February 28, 1854, Miss Angeline Simpson, a native of Pennsylvania. By this marriage they have five living children: Alta U., William E., Rhoda E., Stella M., and Margaret S., and have lost two, Theodore M., and Eva.



BUTLER, W. J.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 216-217

Was born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, October 29, 1842. When but a child his parents moved to Iowa, where they settled on a farm. At the age of twenty the subject of this sketch crossed the plains to California, and arrived at San Francisco June 19, 1863. After about two months, which were spent in the city, he went to Solano County, where he worked at farming until the fall of 1866, when he came to Lake County, where he still resides. Mr. Butler settled on his present place in Big Valley consisting of five hundred acres, in 1869, and is engaged in stock raising. He married, November 5, 1866, Miss Annie C. Ryan, by whom he has six children: James, William, John, Edmond, Elizabeth and Frances A.



BYNUM, Joseph, M. D.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 221-222

Was born March 5, 1820, in Howard County, Missouri, and was educated in college at Fayette, that State. He was married in 1842 to Elizabeth Adams, and on the 3d day of February they moved to Sheridan (Chariton) County, where he commenced practicing medicine, for which he had his diploma two years previous to that time. He engaged in stock raising and merchandising for two years and paid but little attention to his practice. He then concluded to come to California and left his beautiful home April 7, 1853, and arrived in Yolo County in the same year, and established himself in Cacheville, and retained a lucrative practice for twelve years. During this time he was County Physician for eight years. After practicing medicine in Yolo County for twelve years he moved to Lower Lake, Lake County, on account of the advice of friends. He settled in that place in 1864, and there were only three or four houses in the town when he arrived there. Herrick & Getz had a store. The population was so small that he could not make a living by practicing medicine, and he concluded to build a hotel, which was the first hotel that was ever at Lower Lake. It has been his misfortune to lose three of his children in Missouri and two in California, and he has five children living - three sons and two daughters, all residents of Lake County excepting one, who resides in Santa Clara.



"C"

CAHILL, George


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

GEORGE CAHILL, a merchant tailor of Lakeport, was born in Kingstown, Ireland, November 1, 1840. When he was ten years old, he went to London, England, where he learned the tailor’s trade. In 1858 he came to New York city, where he worked at this trade as a journeyman for several years. About the year 1856 he went to Chicago and engaged on his own account in the merchant-tailoring business, where he was very successful. In 1871 he was burned out by the great fire, by which he lost about $15,000. In 1872 he came to California and engaged in business in San Francisco, where he remained about one year. He then went to Eureka, Humboldt County, where he engaged in the tailoring business for seven or eight years. He then went back to San Francisco, where he worked for one year, and finally came to Lake County and engaged in the merchant-tailoring business. He carries about $2,000 worth of stock, employing four hands, and is one of the successful business men of Lakeport. He owns real estate in the town of Lakeport valued at $7,000, and $1,000 worth in Kelseyville. He is a member of the order of the Iron Hall, and also of the Chosen Friends.

Transcribed by: Betty Wilson


CANNON, W. G.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Is a native of Illinois and was born December 12, 1831. Here he resided on a farm with his parents until 1852 when he crossed the plains to California. He came with oc-teams and arrived at Placerville in September of the above year. After spending about four months here he went to Solano County where three years were spent. after which he went to Sonoma County. Here he followed teaming in the redwoods until 1863 when he went to Nevada where he kept hotel for one year. In December 1865, he came to Lake County and engaged in farming and stock raising in Coyote Valley until the fall of 1870, when he settled on his present place, about one mile north from Middletown, where he is engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Cannon married, March 17, 1861, Miss L. S. Berry, a native of Illinois. By this marriage they have seven living children, Robert B., William F., Luenna, Alzada E., Baxter B., Oroville, and Charles R. They have lost two, Ora and Rowena L.




CARPENTER, Sarah Jane


From Carpenter family history

Sarah Jane Carpenter was born in Rensselaer Co., New York April 8, 1836, to Silas and Sabra Eddy Carpenter. She moved with her parents and siblings to Jackson Co., MO in 1846. She was 11 when her father, Silas Carpenter died in Jackson Co., MO.
On March 17, 1853 at age 17, she married Mathew Johnson, in Oak Grove, Missouri, near Independence. They farmed there in Missouri, where the first 4 of their 12 children were born.
In April of 1860 they formed a wagon train, of which Mathew was chosen Captain. In coming to California they followed the Oregon trail to Ft. Laramie and Ft. Hall, then split off, following the Humbolt and Truckee Rivers, on over the Sierras, ending up in Kelseyville, Lake County, where Sarah's sister Rachael Elizabeth Henderson and their mother lived. Sarah and Mathew brought with them on this trip, Sarah Jane's younger sister, Fannie Lucinda Carpenter. She had been living with them since their mother's departure for California with older sister, Rachael in 1857.
In 1868 Mathew purchased 160 acres from the government in Clover Valley, near Upper Lake, and moved his growing family there. They had 12 children, of which 11 grew to adulthood. Mathew farmed, ran commercial grain separators, and built the toll road from Bartlett Springs to Bear Valley, Colusa Co.
Sarah Jane died at her Clover Valley home, June 18, 1899 from complications of diabetes. A few days before she had to have a toe removed because of gangrene. Mathew lived until 1915, when he died at the home of his daughter, Annie Johnson Mosier, which was located on his homestead. Both Mathew and Sarah Jane are buried in the Johnson Lot at the Upper Lake Cemetery.
Mat and Sarah Jane's youngest daughter, Lucy Ellen Johnson Phelps Tallman, was born January 9, 1877 in Clover Valley and died October 31, 1938 and is buried in the Upper Lake Cemetery, near her home. She had married Warren Herbert Phelps in 1900.
Family names of descendents of Sarah Jane Carpenter Johnson are many, because they had 11 children. Some of these descendants are: Johnson, Lyon, DiDio, Crowell, Moiser, Thompson, Williams, Pirket, Vickery, Lohse, Ball, Spurgeon, Brummet, Cosgrove, Gouff, Pierson, Cripe, Grisham, Bates.




CARPENTER, Rachael Elizabeth


From Carpenter family history

Rachael Elizabeth Carpenter, daughter of Silas and Sabra Eddy Carpenter, was born near Troy, Rensselaer County, New York in 1827. In 1846, Silas and Sabra, along with their daughters, Rachael Elizabeth, Sarah Jane, Fannie(Frances?)Lucinda, and son, John migrated to Jackson Co., Missouri. The following year, father Silas died from Typhoid fever.

Shortly after Rachael's father, Silas died, Rachael went to visit with her father's sister in Kentucky. Rachael had a fiance who had joined the 49ers rush to find gold in California. Both Rachael and her Aunt, being of an impetuous nature and loving to ride horses, decided to ride to California. In April of 1850, Rachael, now a young lady of 22, joined with her Aunt and Uncle, and their man and woman slaves, and set out in a covered wagon train for California. The journey took from April until September. In the same wagon train, Rachael met an attractive young man from Kentucky, Robert Henderson. Upon arriving in California, she spent some time in the gold fields looking for her fiance, and discovered that he had died. Traveling to the San Jose area where her Aunt and Uncle had settled, she met up with Robert Henderson again. They were married by the first California Governor, Governor Coleman, in a ceremony at her Aunt's home. Robert had accumulated some funds from the Gold fields and purchased some property in San Jose, along Coyote Creek. There, in November of 1851, their son, Lewis, was born. He was the first white child born in San Jose. Robert and Rachael spent some time in the gold fields, near Hangtown and operated their ranch on Coyote Creek in San Jose.
In 1854 Robert made a trip back to Missouri. The following year, 1855, with young 4 year old son, Lewis, Rachael made the arduous trip back to Missouri to meet her husband. She took a ship to the Isthmus of Panama, and then by boat and mule to the east coast of Panama. Then by ship and horse to Missouri. In 1856 their second child, a daughter, was born in Missouri. The following year, in 1857, Rachael and Robert, along with their two young children and her widowed mother (Sabra Carpenter) and younger 17 year old brother (John), made the overland covered wagon trip, back to California. Her brother died at 18 years of age in San Francisco. (This last sentence can't be right, because John is listed in the 1870 Lake Co. census in the household of Rachael and Robert Henderson. John was 32 years old at the time. Another source says he died in Los Angeles.)
In 1858 they purchased a ranch near what is now Kelseyville, Lake County. They spent their time traveling between the San Jose ranch and Lake County. In 1869 the Hendersons purchased a ranch 12 miles south of Los Angeles in Pico Rivera, from Governor Pico. They now spent time commuting between the three ranches. Tragedy struck the family, when in 1871, at the Pico Ranch in Los Angeles, Robert died at the early age of 47. Rachael spent the remainder of her life with children in the Kelseyville area and Pico Rivera. She died at her daughter, Fannie Henderson Barlow's Pico Rivera Ranch in 1904. Her son Lewis Henderson, tired of commuting, remained in Kelseyville and became a prominent rancher and served as a Lake County Supervisor for 24 years. He died in 1917 at the age of 66. Descendents of his continue to live in Lake County.
Descendents include Henderson, Dorn, Petterson, Holdenried, Fields, Trailor, Humbbling, Haag, Miller and others.




CARVER, James H.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 224

Was born in Kentucky, May 3, 1840. When but an infant his father, his mother being dead, moved to Missouri. In 1859 the subject of this sketch returned to Kentucky and attended school for two years. He then went to Missouri again, where he remained until the spring of 1863, at which time he crossed the plains to Virginia City, Nevada. Here mining was prosecuted until 1864, when, on account of failing health, he came to California. He was engaged in butchering in Vacaville, Solano County, and farming near Dixon until 1875, when he came to Lake County and settled about four miles south from Lakeport. Here he followed farming and stock raising for three years. He then moved to Lakeport and engaged in butchering one year. In the fall of 1879 he settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred and fifty acres, located in Coyote Valley, where he is engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Carver married August 22, 1869, Miss Gertrude Myers, a native of Missouri. They have one child, Emmett E.



CHRISTIE, William A.


From "Memorial and Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Company, 1891. pg. 352.

William A. Christie, a farmer near Lakeport, is a native of Callaway County, Missouri, born in 1845. His father was a native of Scotland, and his mother of New Jersey. In the fall of 1852 his father with his family moved to Santa Clara County, California, where he engaged in farming for the following four years. In 1856 he came to Lake County. When William A. was twenty-one years old he engaged in farming, in partnership with his brother. In February, 1889, he bought the farm on which he now lives. It is located about three miles south of Lakeport, in Big Valley, and contains twenty-eight and three-fourths acres of choice land, which he devotes to the production of fruit and vegetables. He has a fine two-story residence and a good barn.
He was married in 1872, to Mrs. Catharine Bourne. They have three children: Isabel, Maggie and Carrie. Mrs. Christie has one daughter from her first marriage, Mary Ellen Bourne. Mr. Christie is a member of the order of the Iron Hall and of the A.O.U.W.

Transcribed by Kathy Sedler, July 2004


CLENDENIN, E. P.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 226

Was born in Illinois April 2, 1858. When eleven years of age his parents immigrated to California and settled in Napa County. Here they resided until 1872, when they moved to Scotts Valley, Lake County, where the parents still reside. In March, 1880, the subject of this sketch, in company with his brother, William P., engaged in general merchandising in Kelseyville, which business they are still conducting. Mr. Clendenin married, May 7, 1881, Miss Amanda Gard of Kelseyville.



CLENDENIN, Samuel


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Randolph County, Illinois, October 29, 1826. He was reared on a farm, which occupation, together with milling, he followed till 1869, when he came to California, bringing his family, consisting of wife and six children, with him. He settled in Napa County, where he followed farming till 1872, when he came to Lake County and setled on his present place, consisting of eighty acres, located in Scotts Valley, where he is engaged in farming and fruit raising. Mr. Clendenin was married December 27, 1854, to Miss Persis Porter, a native of Ohio, and by this union there are six living children: William P., Flora B., Edward P., Luther P., Samuel H., and George A.



COBB, John

(deceased)

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881
Was born in Henry County, Kentucky, May 19, 1814. His father was a farmer. When John was but a child, his father moved to Indiana where they remained for six years, when they returned to Kentucky. When John was sixteen years of age, they returned to Indiana and his father resided in Jefferson County for five years, and then moved to Arkansas, where he died.
In 1832, John went to Vigo County, Indiana, on the Wabssh River where he followed keel-boating, carrying freight to all the towns on the river.
In October, on one of his trips, he laid up for the night at the foot of Coffee Island, eight miles below the Grand Rapids and two miles below Mount Carmel. About eight o'clock, he noticed quite a commotion taking place with the stars; they all seemed to be falling towards the earth; they seemed to inccrease thicker and faster until almost midnight, when all of them seemed to part in the center above, falling towards earth in all directions. They resembled many balls of fire, each leaving a brilliant light behind it; one would not get out of sight til another would be coming on the same line. The whole firmament seemed to be in a blaze of fire; it was the most beautiful sight he ever saw in his life. The stas seemed to gradually decrease in motion until about four o'clock in the morning, when all was quiet and every star was in its proper place. He then proceeded down the river into the Ohio, and down that stream to Paducah, at the mouth of the Tennessee River; he then went up the Tennessee with the keel-boat to Florence in Tennessee; then he returned to Indiana - to the Grand Forks, on the Wabash River. There he put in a crop of corn, sold it out, and went to Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Indiana where he got a team and went back to Madison in Jefferson County after his mother, two sisters and brother and moved to Iowa Territory. They stopped at a place called Bloomington, which had one house in it, owned by John Vanater, the proprietor of the place. It soon grew up, however, to be quite a village and place of trade. It is located on the banks of the upper Mississippi River, thirty miles below Rock Island and sixty miles above Burlington. The name has since been changed to Muscatine City, Muscatine County. He then resided in that place where he followed farming and trading, for three years. In 1839, he took his mother on a visit to her mother, who resided in Madison, Indiana, in April of that year.
From there he returned to Iowa; staying there until fall, and started for Texas; got as far as Arkansas and was taken sick with the white swelling, which left him a cripple for life. He gave up the trip to Texas and returned again to Iowa in the spring of 1841, and remained there until 1843.
He then went to Quincy, Illinois. He married to Miss Jane Ann Leypold, April 18, 1844, who was a native of Ohio. Their first child, a son, was born February 18, 1845, and died August 15, 1845. Their next, a daughter, was born January 13, 1847. He lost his wife January 12, 1848 and his daughter died January 16, 1848.
On August 17, 1848 he was married to his second wife, Miss Esther E. Deming, who is istill living. She is a native of Ohio, and the mother of six children, whose names are as follows: John R. (Rufus), George O., Joseph D. (Deming), Mary H. O. , William T., and Hester E. The first one, John R. was born September 22, 1849, and the sixth one, Hester E., was born July 8, 1858.
In the spring of 1850, he started across the plains with an ox-team en route for California, bringing his family, consisting then of wife and one child with him. They reached Salt Lake, August 17, 1850, but owing to the delicate health of Mrs. Cobb, they remained there until the spring of 1851, when they crossed the mountains, and arrived at Ringold (Ringgold), near Placerville, California, on July 1st of that year. He then engaged in mining for about three weeks, when he bought into a grocery store and kept boarding-house, which business he followed until September.
He then sold out and moved to Napa Valley, Napa County and rented a place of John S. Stark, about four miles below Calistoga Springs, which he farmed one year. He sold his crop and went to Oregon in September 1852 and spent one year there, and returned to Napa County in August 1853. He then rented a place of John Tucker and Peter Teal for farming purposes. In October of the same year, he went north of Napa Valley, towards Clear Lake, and took up a place in what is now known as Cobb Valley, which took its name after him, he being the first settler there. He then moved his family there in November 1853; a wild wilderness of a place, inhabited by various kinds of wild game and animals; elk, deer, bears, panthers, wolves, wild cats and foxes.
In 1854, he was solicited to run for the office of County Assessor, and was elected. He assessed Napa County in 1855. He lived about five years in Cobb Valley, then sold out and moved to Napa Valley again; bought a tract of land in the said valley of M. D. Ritchie, and remained on it about eighteen months, and sold it out. He then moved out to Calyomi Valley and settled near where Middletown is now. He then farmed and raised stock on that place about three years.
About that time, Lake County was segregated from Napa County. He was then put in charge of the Calyomi and Guenoc grants, and moved to the Stone House. He was put in charge of the grants by Robert Waterman. He farmed that ranch two years, and leased out the farms on the grant to the settlers. He then moved to Sonoma County; remained there two years educating his children, and then returned to Lake County with his family to his place that he had previously entered, containing five hundred and twenty acres. He resided on this far about four years, improving it; then moved to Healdsburg (Sonoma County); resided there about eighteen months, completing the education of his children.
He then returned with this family to Lake County, to his farm, where he has resided ever since. By referring to the dates, it will be found that Mr. Cobb is about the first white settler, or the oldest settler, now in Lake County.



COLLINS, J. M.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 225

Was born in Indiana. When he was but a child his parents moved to Clay County, Missouri, and settled on a farm. In 1853 the subject of this sketch came across the plains to California, and arrived in El Dorado County in August. Here he engaged in mining until the spring of 1860, when he went to Suisun, Solano County, where he resided until the fall of 1863, when he came to Lake County. Here he bought what is now known as the Howard Springs property, where he resided one year. We next find Mr. Collins engaged in farming near Lower Lake, where he remained until the fall of 1868, when he settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred and one acres, located about one mile west from Middletown. He married March 19, 1865, Miss Lizzie Farmer, a native of Missouri. By this union they have eight children, William M., Edward, Robert, Annie, Emma, Augustus, Eldorado, and Gracie.



COMBS, James H.


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

JAMES H. COMBS, a farmer of Lake County, was born in Montgomery County, Kentucky, December 21, 1832. In 1842 his parents moved to Independence, Missouri. His father died in 1849. In 1850 James H. returned to Mount Sterling, Kentucky, to finish his education. He graduated from the Mt. Sterling Academy, an institution of note that part of the State, in 1852. In 1853 he crossed the plains, with ox and mule teams, to California. He first settled in San Ramon Valley, where he remained one year. He then went to San José, where he remained about two years. In 1856 he returned to Missouri, where he remained till 1872. He then returned to California and settled near Redwood City, where he engaged in farming. In the fall of 1875 he came to Lake County and settled in Lakeport, where he resided for two years, not engaging in active business on account of poor health. In 1887 he purchased his present farm, on which he has since resided. He has 140 acres situated about three miles south of Lakeport on the Kelseyville and Highland Springs road. He raises grain and fruit. He has five acres in fruit trees, including a general variety. He is also engaged to some extent in raising horses.
Mr. Combs was married July 15, 1860, to Miss Elizabeth Marshall, a daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Marshall, natives of Kentucky. They have six children: Robert Marshall, M. Sue, Carrie H., James H., Jr., Marshall R. and Bessie.
Mr. Combs is a member of the A.O.U.W.

Transcribed by: Betty Wilson


CONNER, D. V.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 227

Is a native of Napa County, California, and was born August 16, 1853. When but a child his parents moved to Lake County and settled near Lower Lake. Here the father was engaged in dairying until 1858, when he moved to Bachelor Valley and prosecuted farming until 1868, when he moved to Colusa County, where he engaged in the same business. In 1874 the subject of this sketch engaged in wool growing in Colusa County on his own account. In 1877 he returned to Lake County and followed the same business in Bachelor Valley until the fall of 1880, when he settled on his present place about two and one-half miles west from Lakeport, where, in company with W. P. Burke, he is engaged in wool growing. Mr. Conner also owns about forty acres located in Scotts Valley. He married October 22, 1879, Miss Sarah A. Donigan, a native of Illinois. By this union they have one child, George E.



COOK, John R.


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891, Pages 645-646

John R. Cook, editor and proprietor of the Lakeport Democrat, was born November 15, 1845, in Matagorda, Texas. His father, H. L. Cook, was one of the early pioneers of that State. John R. entered a printing office when he was about twelve years of age, where he remained a number of years, thoroughly learning the art of printing, and before he had arrived at the age of eighteen he became editor and proprietor of a paper in his native State. He came to California in 1868, first locating in Lower Lake, Lake County, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits for several years, first as a clerk and afterward on his own account. In 1872, he removed to Lakeport, where he was engaged in different lines of business until 1879. April 1 of that year, he purchased the Bee-Democrat, a journal which resulted from the consolidation of the two leading newspapers of Lake County, viz: the Lake County Bee and the Lake Democrat. The Lakeport Democrat has been the official county paper ever since it has been under the management of Mr. Cook. As its name indicates, it is strictly Democratic in politics, but Mr. Cook is independent and progressive, and is a zealous worker for the general interests of his town and county, as well as his party. He therefore enjoys the confidence and esteem of the entire community, irrespective of politics. The Democrat is a bright newspaper, ably conducted, and will compare favorably with the leading county papers of the State. Mr. Cook has large and commodious offices and press-room, supplied with paper and job presses, employs an able corps of assistants; therefore, all work from his office is promptly done and in the finest style of the art. He is a member of the State Democratic Central Committee, which important position he has held for the past six years. He fraternizes with the Masons and Odd Fellows, and has filled all the principal offices of the lodges of each of those orders.

Transcribed by: Christine Helmick


COX, Calvary M.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 225

Was born in Virginia January 23, 1833. When about seven years of age his parents moved to Missouri, where farming was prosecuted until 1854, when the subject of this sketch left his parents and crossed the plains to California, and arrived where Woodland now stands, September 17th of the above-mentioned year. After a short rest he hied himself to the mines, and engaged in digging for the precious metal until June, 1856. In October of that year he came to Lake County, and settled in Morgan Valley, where, in company with his brother Thomas, he is engaged in farming and stock raising.



CRAWFORD, Hon. Crockett M.


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

HON. CROCKETT M. CRAWFORD, a native of Lake County, California, was born in Lakeport, April 14, 1860. He received his education in the public schools and the Lakeport Academy. He has been teaching in the schools of the county since 1881. He was elected to the State Legislature, November, 1888. He introduced a bill in the last session of the Assembly to provide free text-books for the public schools of the State, which passed both houses, but was vetoed by Governor R.W. Waterman. He also introduced what was known as the “Omnibus Educational bill,” which became a law. The object of this bill was to perfect the school law. He has been principal of the Upper Lake schools for the past three years.
He was married June 6, 1885, to Miss Nora Graham, who is also a native of California. They have two children: Velma and Amy, aged five and two years respectively. He is a member of Lakeport Parlor, No. 147, N. S. of G. W.

Transcribed by: Betty Wilson


CRAWFORD, Woods


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Richland County, Ohio, December 8, 1829. When he was nine years of age he, with his parents, moved to DeKalb County, Illinois, where he received his education. At the age of eighteen he began teaching vocal music, which he followed until March, 1850, when he went to Missouri, where he engaged in the same vocation until 1853. He then crossed the plains with ox-teams, and brought a drove of cattle.
He followed mining in Shasta County for one winter, and in the spring of 1854 came to Lake County with the Hammack party, arriving where Kelseyville now stands, April 16th. He settled in Big Valley, and engaged in farming and carpentering for about four years, and then turned his whole attention to farming until 1864. He then moved to Lakeport, and engaged in the practice of law, which he has since followed.
Since his residence in Lakeport he has filled the position of District Attorney for about five years--once by appointment and twice by election. He was appointed by the Legislture as one of the commissioners who organized Lake County. He was married, October 13, 1852, to Miss Margaret A. Hammack, daughter of Martin Hammack. They have six living children--Florence H., Crockett M., Susan R., Mary L., Emma, and Frank W., they have lost one, Elizabeth R.



CRIGLER, Honorable J. C.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 225

This worthy pioneer of Lake County was born in Kentucky December 21, 1819. When he was five years of age his parents moved to Missouri, where his father engaged in hotel-keeping. At the age of twenty-three Mr. Crigler was employed as collector by Dr. Luflington, for whom he traveled for four years. At the end of that time he was appointed sheriff of the county in which he resided, and continued in office for a period of four years. In March, 1849, he started across the plains with ox-teams, bound for California, arriving in Hangtown (Placerville) in August of that year. He engaged at once in mining, which he followed until the spring of 1852. He then engaged in the stock business and followed it till the fall of that year, when he returned East via Nicaragua. In the spring of 1853 he, in company with B. J. Payne, purchased a drove of cattle and brought them overland to California, arriving at Sacramento about September 1st of that year. Mr. Crigler located in Colusa County, where he followed stock raising until 1857. He then moved to Napa County and settled near Berryessa Valley, engaging in his former occupation until 1862, when he moved to Lakeport. That fall he was elected to the office of Sheriff, to which he was re-elected in the fall of 1863 and 1865, holding the office till 1867. At the election of that year he was chosen to represent Napa and Lake Counties in the Assembly and was again elected to the same position in 1869. He then returned to the life of a civilian, making his home at Lower Lake, until called to public life again by the voice of the people by being elected Sheriff in the fall of 1877. He then returned to Lakeport, where he made his home during the term of his office, and continued to reside there till the fall of 1880. He then moved to Middletown, where he remained about four months. In March, 1881, he moved to Bartlett Springs, where his is acting as agent for Mr. Greene Bartlett. Mr. Crigler has always been characterized as an enterprising, honorable and genial ccitizen, always having the best interest of the community in which he resides at heart. That he made a popular and efficient officer is evinced by the fact that the people called upon him so often to serve them in an official capacity. It is safe to say that no man in Lake County enjoys a greater amount of confidence and esteem by the people at large than does Mr. Crigler. In Colusa County he held the office of Associate Justice for about eighteen months, also Supervisor for one term. He was married March 8, 1855, to Miss Amanda Adams, a native of Missouri. They have three children, Octavia, Katie and Jennie.



CRUMP, Captain R. W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 223

Present District Attorney of Lake County, was born in Greenville County, Virginia, September 25, 1828, and is therefore now about fifty-three years of age. At the age of about fifteen years, he moved with his mother and her family, his father having died several years before, to Shelby County, Tennessee, near Memphis. Here he resided until the fall of 1851, when he moved with his wife, having been married to Miss Caroline Pierce, of Halifax, North Carolina, in 1850, to Poinsett County, Arkansas. He was admitted to the practice of law in that county in 1855. In the early part of the year 1860, he moved to Panola County, Mississippi, where he resided until June, 1875, when he moved with his family to Santa Rosa, California, and thence to Lakeport, in the fall of 1877. Captain Crump was admitted to practice law in all the counties of Mississippi in 1860, and again the District Courts of California in Santa Rosa in 1875. Having impaired his voice seriously before coming to California, he did not make the law a specialty after coming to this State until he was elected District Attorney of Lake County in 1879. In the meantime he was engaged on the staff of the Santa Rosa Daily "Democrat" as city editor for about two years, and then took charge of the Lake County "Bee," and was the principal editor of that paper until the spring of 1880. Captain Crump has been twice married, having married his present wife, Mrs. Lenora B. Clanton, in Sardis, Mississippi, in the fall of 1871. He has living seven children. Though engaged in the practice of law since 1858, he was also engaged in cotton planting from the time of his majority until the close of the war, when his negroes were emancipated. He is a Democrat in politics, and made a strong fight for the adoption of the new Constitution of California, by speeches and through the columns of his paper, the Lake County "Bee." Lake County having voted for its adoption by a large majority, he was elected as a New Constitution Democrat over very strong opponents to the office he now holds.


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

CAPTAIN R.W. CRUMP, an attorney at Lakeport, was born in Greensville County, Virginia, September 25, 1828, and when about fifteen years of age he moved with his mother and the family (his father having died several years previously) to Shelby County, Tennessee, near Memphis; and during his residence there he was married to Miss Caroline Pierce, of Halifax, North Carolina. In the fall of 1851 he moved with his wife to Poinsett County, Arkansas, and there he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1855. In the early part of 1860 he moved to Panola County, Mississippi, and was a resident there until June, 1875, when he came to Santa Rosa, California, and moved thence to Lakeport, in the fall of 1877. He was admitted to the practice of law in the courts of Mississippi in 1860, and in the District Courts of California in Santa Rosa in 1875. Having seriously impaired his voice before coming to California, he did not make the law a specialty until he was elected District Attorney of Lake County, in 1879. Before that date he was for about two years engaged on the staff of the Santa Rosa Democrat as city editor; then took charge of the Lake County Bee, and was its principal editor until the spring of 1880. He remained in the District Attorney’s office until December, 1883, having been re-elected in 1881; in the fall election of 1886 he was again chosen for another term of two years.
Though actively engaged in the practice of law since 1858, he has also engaged in cotton-planting from the time of his majority until the close of the war, when his negroes were emancipated.
Captain Crump has been twice married. His present wife was Mrs. Leonora B. Clanton, in Sardis, Mississippi, and they were married in the fall of 1871. He has seven living children.
TURNER W. CRUMP, son of Captain R.W. Crump, was born in Sardis, Mississippi, in 1865, and came with his parents on their removal to California. In 1887 he engaged in the real-estate and insurance business, in company with his father. He is now (April, 1890,) serving as City Clerk of Lakeport, having been elected to that office by the Board of Trustees, in February, 1890.


Transcribed by Betty Wilson


CRUMPTON, H. J., M.D.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 224-225

Was born near Charleston, South Carolina, in 1828. At an early age he was apprenticed to learn the "art preservative," and while serving as a "printer's devil," he resolved to work his way through a medical education. He was thus engaged when gold was discovered in California. He at once determined to visit the new El Dorado, and started out in 1848 to "tramp it" across the continent, and reached the "diggings" the following year. He began operations at Caldwell's store, now Nevada City, and followed that business with varying fortunes the ensuing ten years, by the end of which time he had amassed a handsome competency. He then returned to the "States" for the purpose of completing his medical education. He returned to California after finishing his medical course, and engaged in the practice of his profession. Having visited the territory now forming Lake County on a hunting excursion some thirty years ago, and being charmed with its natural beauties, he determined to make his residence permanent here. He has a pretty little home on one of Lakeport's "seven hills," and extensive practice, and stands well in his profession, being at this time an officer in the State Medical Society. In 1880 he was elected to the State Legislature, and in that body he stood squarely and nobly by the people, and his voice was ever raised against stock-jobbing and tax-shirking. He is a gentleman of unimpeached integrity, generous to a fault, and a citizen of whom the people of Lake County may justly feel proud.




"D"

DALY, P. M.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, PG. 229-230

This early pioneer of Lake County was born in county Galway, Ireland, July 20, 1831. Here he grew up and received a common school education, equal to the facilities which that day and age of the country afforded. He remained with his parents on a farm until 1848 when he boarded the Scotch ship "Marine Plant," and sailed for New York, at which city he arrived July 3d of that year. After spending about five months here he changed his base of operations to New Orleans, where he spent the succeeding six months. His next move was to go to Yucatan, Central America, and engage in fighting Indians. He remained there for about ten months, when he returned to the United States and located in Kentucky, engaging in work in a general mercantile establishment, where he remained during the following three years. He then went again to the city of New York, from which place, after a short time, he shipped on board the ship "Yorktown," bound for California. He rounded Cape Horn, and arrived in San Francisco in the fall of 1852. He went to the mines at once, and engaged in that business for a period of ten months. He then returned to San Francisco, and engaged in draying for about six months. He then sold out that business and engaged in bottling porter and ale, and continued in this occupation until October, 1857. He then came to Lake County and settled on his present place, which is located in the heart of the beautiful and fertile Big Valley, three and a half miles south of Lakeport. This farm consists of two hundred and fifteen acres, while another farm, one mile farther up the valley, contains two hundred and forty acres. This land is all very rich, and they make two as fine farms as are to be found in Lake County. He is now engaged in stock raising and speculating in stock. He was married April 20, 1854, to Miss Mary O'Hare, a native of Ireland. They have, as the fruits of their union, eight living children, as follows: Jane, Mary, Arthur, James, Thomas, William, Dennis and Margaret. They have lost one, Mark.



DAVIS, Jeff


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881
Was born in Tennessee, December 4, 1819. Here he resided on a farm until twenty-one years of age when he went to Arkansas and engaged in stock raising until 1848, when he went to Illinois. There he followed farming for two years, then he moved to Missouri where the same business was prosecuted until 1863; when he crossed the plains to California and arrived in Solano County in November. In the spring of 1864, he came to Lake County and settled in Scotts Valley, and after a few month moved to Lakeport where he remained until June 1865 when he went to Napa County and followed stock raising two years. The following four years were spent in hotel-keeping at Monticello. He next engaged in stock raising, and in November 1875, disposed of his interests in Napa County and returned to Lake and settled on his present place, consisting of four hundred and sixty-six acres, located in Coyote Valley, where he engaged in wool growing. Mr. Davis married, September 9, 1840, Miss Nancy Brooks. Their living children are: Polly A., James, George W. and Dixie. They have lost William, Benjamin F., Lillie I., and Thomas J.

p. 184 - INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD-FELLOWS - Friendship Lodge, No. 130, I. O. O. F. was organized December 25, 1868 at Guenoc, ...The following named gentlement have filled the position of Nobble Grand: H. J. Berry, O. Armstrong, George E. McKinley, William Amesberry, J. M. Davis,...............

p. 162 - EARLY SETTLEMENT - ...In Scotts Valley, Greenbury Hendricks, E. C. Riggs, William Gessner, John Lynch, J. M. Sleepter, J. Davis, A. F. Tate and J. H. Moore....

Contributed by Margaret Hinton



DEMING, Theodore


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 230-231

Was born in St. Joseph County, Indiana, April 13, 1836. Here he received his education and resided until 1855, when, with his parents, he came to California via Panama, arriving at San Francisco, December 15th of the above year. After spending the winter in Sacramento the family settled in Yolo County, and engaged in farming. Here the parents both died, and in the fall of 1870 the subject of this sketch came to Lake County. Mr. Deming owns and conducts the Blue Lakes Hotel, as well as a farm in Scotts Valley. He married January 12, 1867, Mrs. Charlotte W. Holliday, a native of Indiana. By this union they have four living children, Mary E., Fannnie E., Dasie, and Mabel C.



DENISON, James M.

(deceased)

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, November 24, 1818. When he was eighteen years of age he went to Iowa, where he followed farming until 1852. He then crossed the plains to California with ox-teams, bringing his family with him, and arrived in Placer County in October of that year. He followed mining there until 1857, when he came to Lake County and settled on Middle Creek near Upper Lake, and engaged in farming till 1861. He then returned East, and served as First Lieutenant of Company B, 20th regiment Iowa Volunteers, for three years. His family remained on their farm during his absence, and he returned in 1866, and remained there till 1875, when he constructed the toll-road from Upper Lake to Bartlett Springs. He was married April 26, 1843, to Miss Mary Jewell, a native of New York. He died December 8, 1876, leaving a widow, and eight children, as follows: Margaret E., Merritt L., Alice, Mary A., Victoria, Laura, James H., and Olive C.; and they have lost one, Daniel W.



DEWELL, Benjamin


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Ohio October 27, 1823. In 1840 he, with parents, moved to Indiana, where he resided until 1845, when, in company with several others, he crossed the plains to California, arriving in Napa Valley in October of the above year. The first winter was spent where Calistoga is now located; and in the spring of 1846 he went to Sonoma and served in the Bear Flag War, and then joined Fremont's regiment, and in the fall the regiment was ordered below, but only got as far as Los Angeles when a treaty was made and the war ended. The subject of this sketch then returned to Sonoma and in the spring of 1847 settled in Guilicos Valley, where he followed farming and stock raising until May, 1854, when he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, located just above Upper Lake, where he has since been engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Dewell was one of the parties who made the Bear Flag which was raised at Old Sonoma June 14,1846, and his mother-in-law, Mrs. W. B. Elliott, furnished part of the cloth of which the flag was made. Mr. Dewell married May 5, 1850, Miss Celia H. Elliott, by whom he has eight living children: Samuel L., Luella, Orlena, Elmer E., May, Lottie, John K. and Charles W. They have lost two, Sarah E. and Jane



From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

BENJAMIN DEWELL, one of the earliest pioneers of California, emigrated from Indiana in 1845. The company with which he came started for Oregon, but, on account of there being no roads or ferries, their progress was necessarily slow, and after passing Salt Lake their guides advised them, on account of the lateness of the season, to cross the mountains into California, which they did, arriving near Sonoma in October. They were six months and one day on the journey. Mr. Dewell made his first permanent settlement in 1850, in Guilicos Valley, lying between Santa Rosa and Sonoma, where he commenced improving land which he had selected for a home. He planted an orchard and vineyard, and made other valuable improvements, which he had to abandon after two years, as his location proved to be within the limits of a grant.
In 1846, the war with Mexico having been inaugurated, the few Americans who had come to settle in California organized into a company for self-protection. In the spring of 1846 they captured Sonoma, which was held by General Vallejo and a small garrison. There were thirty-three Americans, who surprised the garrison at daylight, and effected a capture without difficulty. Mr. Dewell, with the assistance of two comrades, were the manufacturers of the celebrated Bear Flag. In 1854 he came to Upper Lake with his family and located on his present farm, his being the second family to settle in what is now Lake County. He has 160 acres of as good land as can be found in any country, on which he raises grain, hay and stock. He also has a large orchard. He was married in 1850, to Miss Celia Elliott, a native of Missouri. They have nine children, living: Samuel M., Orlena and Luella (twins), Elmer E., May, Lottie, John, Charles W. and Irene, Sarah E. and Jane are dead. Mr. Dewell is a member of the I.O.O.F., of long standing. Politically he is thoroughly Republican.

Transcribed by: Betty Wilson


DOWNS, J. S., MD


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California"
The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

J.S. DOWNS, M.D., one of the oldest practicing physicians of Northern California, was born in the city of Haverhill, New Hampshire, April 14, 1831. He received his early education in the schools of Newbury, Vermont. At the age of fourteen he went to Battle Creek, Michigan, where he studied medicine with Dr. Edward Cox, for five years. In 1847 he went to Chicago, where he attended one session of the Rush Medical College. He then went to St. Louis and entered the St. Louis Medical College, where he graduated in 1848. In the spring of 1849 he crossed the plains to California, arriving at Sacramento in July, where he engaged in the practice of medicine, uninterruptedly for the following ten years. In 1859, having lost his health, through over-work and exposure incidental to the practice of his profession, he went to Lakeport, Lake County, where he practiced for three years. Having regained his health, he then went to Napa City where he engaged in practice with Dr. W.W. Stillwagon until 1864. His health again failing him, he returned to Lakeport, where he has since resided and followed his profession, and where he has established a very pleasant and comfortable home. He was married, in 1858, to Miss Kate Sheridan, a daughter of Hon. James E. Sheridan, who has served in both branches of the California Legislature. He was a cousin to General Phil H. Sheridan. They have three children: Frank, Charles S. and Ernst.
Frank is in business in San Francisco, Charles S. in the drug business in Oakland, and Ernst, the youngest, is reading medicine with his father.

Transcribed by: Betty Wilson




From "History of Napa and Lake Counties, California" 1881 - Pg. 231-232
J. S. DOWNES, M.D.

This worthy old pioneer of Lake County was born in New Hampshire, April 14, 1831. When he was fourteen years of age he went to Michigan, and began the study of medicine with Dr. Edward Cox, at Battle Creek, where he remained for five years. He graduated at the McDowell Medical School in St. Louis, in March, 1848. In April, 1849, he started for California across the plains, and arrived at Sacramento in July. He practiced medicine in that city for ten years. In 1859, on account of ill-health, he came to Lake County and settled in Lakeport, where he practiced till 1862. His health being much improved then, he went to Napa and engaged in practice with Dr. W. W. Stillwagon until 1864. His health failed again, and he then returned to Lakeport, where he has since resided and followed his profession. He was married, August 16, 1858, to Miss Katie Shindon, a native of Pennsylvania. Their children are George F., Charles and Ernest.



"E"

EDMUNDS, J. F.


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California"
The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891, Pages 656-657

J. F. Edmunds, dealer in harness and saddles at Lakeport, California, was born in Scottville, Allen County, Kentucky, in 1832. His parents were natives of that State. He received his education in the schools of Scottville. At the age of fourteen he entered a harness and saddlery store in his native town, where he served two years in learning that trade. He then went to Elkton, where he was engaged for a little more than a year, completing his apprenticeship, after which he traveled in Kentucky, Tennessee and Missouri, working as a journeyman in the harness and saddlery business. While in Missouri he worked two years at New Madrid. In March, 1853, he started for California via New Orleans. He traveled down the Mississippi River on a steamboat. At New Orleans he embarked on the steamship United States for Aspinwall. Crossing the Isthmus to Panama, he sailed on the steamer Cortes for San Francisco, where he arrived May 4. From San Francisco he went to Marysville and from there to the northern part of Sierra County, where he engaged in mining for a few months. He then engaged in merchandising, in which he continued until 1858. During this time he was also engaged in mining ventures, with the variable results incident to that business. In 1858, he bought the Columbus House, a hotel located at Strawberry Valley, Yuba County, where he remained till 1862, doing a very profitable business. He then sold his hotel and removed to Marysville, where he engaged in the wholesale liquor business, in which he continued two years. In 1864, he sold his business in Marysville and engaged as a traveling salesman for a wholesale liquor house of San Francisco, in which he continued till about 1870. He then again engaged in the liquor business in Marysville, in which he continued about a year and a half, when he sold out and renewed his engagement as a traveling salesman. In 1880, he went to Pennington, Sutter County, where he built a hotel and also a store building, which he occupied as a harness and saddle and variety store. In 1888 he disposed of his property in Pennington and removed to Lake County, where he opened a harness and saddlery store in Lakeport. His business here is constantly increasing and he now carries a line of carriages, sewing machines, etc., in connection with his other business. He is also engaged in the insurance business and represents a number of first class companies.
He was married in 1857 to Miss Mary C. Spillman, a native of Allen County, Kentucky. They have three children living: Alice, Samuel and James R. Alice is married to Read McCraney, a jeweler of Lakeport. Samuel is a painter and James R. is in the harness business in Hopland, Mendocino County. Mr. Edmunds is connected with the Christian Church, and is a member of the Masonic Fraternity.

Transcribed by: Christine Helmick


EMERSON, S. R.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 232

Was born in Cortland County, New York, March 28, 1820. Here he remained until 1849, being engaged in farming and stock raising. He then went to Crawford County, Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1857, being engaged in the stock business. In the last named year he came to California via Panama, and arrived at San Francisco April 27th. He engaged at once in farming and dairying in Sonoma County, which was followed until 1859, when he turned his attention to wool growing. This he continued until 1860, when he engaged in hotel-keeping in Windsor, Sonoma County, which was followed until 1869. In 1870 he made a trip East and spent the summer, returning to California in the winter of 1870-'71. He came at once to Lake County and engaged in wool growing, which he has since followed. Mr. Emerson owns the Witter Spring property, a history of which will be found in this volume.



ENGLISH, B. F.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 232

Was born in Madison County, Kentucky, September 8, 1815. When he was but a child, he, with his parents, moved to Howard County, Missouri. After a short residence there they moved to Salem County, and from there to Clay County. August 16, 1833, the subject of this sketch married Miss Pauline Durbin, and in 1835 they moved upon the Platt Purchase. In 1843 they moved into Atchison County, and emigrated to Oregon in 1846. Here farming was followed until 1863, when they came to California and settled in Green Valley, Solano County. While there the same occupation was followed as while in Oregon until 1870, when they moved to Lake County and settled on the road leading from Middletown to Lakeport, near Anderson Springs, where they now reside. They have six living children: Charles H., Benjamin F., Harmon H., Eugene, Lane B. and Lucretia; and have lost five.



"F"

FEES, John W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 232 - 233

Was born in Iowa, February 15, 1837. In 1864 he crossed the plains to Nevada, where he followed mining and carpentering until the fall of 1867, when he came to Lake County and settled in Scotts Valley, on his present place, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, located about five miles from Lakeport, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. Fees married in October, 1856, Miss Rebecca M. R. Ogle, a native of Indiana. Their children are Thomas J., Sarah, Albert, Alfred, Nancy A., Mary A., John and Mabel.



FLIPPEN, W. J.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 233

Is a native of Tennessee, and was born October 24, 1826. In March, 1852, he moved to Missouri, where he followed farming until the spring of 1854, when he crossed the plains with ox-teams to California. After spending about three years at mining in Butte County, we find him in Contra Costa County, where he resided until September, 1866, when he came to Lake County. In the fall of 1867 Mr. Flippen settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and twenty acres, located in Scotts Valley, about six miles from Lakeport, where he is engaged in farming. He was married, December 21, 1848, to Miss Elizabeth Palmer. By this union they have three living children: Mary H., William and Lizzie. They have lost three: John H., James B. and Jefferson.



FOREE, George H.


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California"
The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

GEORGE H. FOREE, a Lakeport merchant, was born in Solano County, California, in July, 1853, and was early left an orphan. He first graduated at Lincoln Grammar School in San Francisco and afterward at Heald’s Business College in the same city. He was then for several years engaged in various occupations,—bookkeeping, clerking in a store and mining; in the latter he was employed about seven years, in Siskiyou, Klamath and El Dorado counties. In 1883 he went to Lakeport, Lake County and bought the hardware store of Tate & Co., and has ever since been engaged in that trade, with varying fortune. His store has been twice burned,—in 1885 and 1887; and his dwelling was burned in August, 1888, the fire in each case catching from adjoining buildings. He is still a bachelor, but his sister has resided with him since his first arrival in Lakeport.


Transcribed by Betty Wilson


FRITTS, H. R.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 233

Was born in Indiana June 9, 1838. When he was but a child his parents moved to Arkansas. Here young Fritts grew up on a farm, residing with his parents until 1860, when he crossed the plains with ox-teams to California. He arrived in Chico, Butte County, in September, and engaged in teaming for one year. He then went to Nevada, where the same business was followed until the fall of 1865, when he came back to Lake County, and, after a residence of about twelve years on Middle Creek, settled on his present place, consisting of six hundred and twenty-nine acres, located in Bachelor Valley, where he is engaged in farming and wool growing. Mr. Fritts married, May 6, 1866, Miss Alice Denison, a native of Iowa. Their children are, Mattie A., Mary E., Fannie V., Laura E., Ollie M., and Maud B.



"G"

GALLATIN, Abraham


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 237

Was born in Pennsylvania, September 18, 1818. Here he followed farming and boat-building until 1842, when he went to Illinois. After spending two years there he returned to Pennsylvania, where he resumed his former business until 1852, at which time he came to California via New Orleans and Panama. We find him at once in the mines, where he remained until 1868. He then made a trip East and traveled in several of the different States for about two years, but finally settled in Napa City, Napa County. Here he resided until 1874, when he moved to Pope Valley, where he resided until December, 1878, when he moved to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of three thousand acres, located in Coyote Valley. Here he is engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Gallatin married, October 18, 1870, Mrs. Slonecker, a native of Pennsylvania.



GARD, G. W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Preble County, Ohio, January 2, 1826. When he was but a child his parents moved to Rush County, Indiana, and after about five years moved to Delaware County. Here about the same length of time was spent as in Rush County, when they took up their residence in Atchison County, Missouri. In 1849 the whole family, consisting of the father and mother of the subject of this sketch, nine brothers and sisters, and his wife and one child, crossed the plains to California. They settled in San Joaquin County, near Stockton, and engaged in farming. In September, 1859, G. W. moved with his family to Sonoma County and engaged in farming until January, 1860, when he went to Yuba County and spent the winter in mining. In may, 1861, he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and twenty acres, located in Big Valley, about two miles from Kelseyville, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. Gard married, March 5, 1848, Miss Eliza J. Hand, a native of Tennessee, by whom he has seven living children: Isaac N., Martha E., Joel R., James A., Annie M., Arthur G. and Mary E.; and have lost seven.



GESSNER, William


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 235

Was born in Bavaria, Germany, October 27, 1821. Here he received a collegiate education, and in September, 1839, set sail for America aboard the "Oceana," which was wrecked near Jamaica, where the crew was detained about one month. They then got relief by the Government, and finally arrived at New Orleans about the 23d of December, 1839. Mr. Gessner went at once to Illinois, where he taught the German language two winters, working in a brick-yard in the summer. In the spring of 1842 he engaged as clerk in the hardware store of Charles Wolf & Co., in St. Louis. Here he remained until July, 1844, when he went to New Orleans, where he followed clerking until January, 1845, when he enlisted in the 2d Dragoons of the regular United States service, and was engaged in the war with Mexico, serving through the war. He was discharged January 20, 1850, at Sonoma, Sonoma County, California. Mr. Gessner was engaged for three months in the quartermaster's office at Benicia, after which he went to the mines, and after spending about three months came to Solano County and engaged in farming in Suisun Valley, where he remained until the spring of 1864, when he sold his farm and went via Panama to Pennsylvania, where he remained but a short time. He returned across the plains with horse and mule teams, and arrived in Suisun Valley in August. In October, 1864, he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred and forty acres, located at the head of Scotts Valley, where he is now engaged in farming. Mr. Gessner was elected Supervisor in September, 1879, which office he still holds.



GETZ, Solomon


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 233

Was born in Prussia, January 29, 1850. When fourteen years of age he started for America, and in March, 1866, we find him in San Francisco, and soon after in Lower Lake, where he is engaged as a clerk for his brother Joseph, in a general merchandise store. After following this occupation for one year he went to South America, where he engaged in the fur trade until 1870. The succeeding two years were spent in traveling, and in 1872 he returned to Lower Lake, where he still continues to run the store so early established by his brother. Mr. Getz married, March 1, 1874, Miss Dora Tobias, a native of New York. By this union they have four children: Albert, Edgar, Jacob and Mabel.



GIBSON, Frank W.


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California" The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891, pg 436-437

A native of England, was born near London, May 28, 1846. In 1849 his parents came to the United States. They landed at New Orleans, and immediately started up the Mississippi River for Illinois. In 1850 they removed to Quincy, where Mr. Gibson started the Quincy Whig, which was afterward the first newspaper in Illinois to unfurl the Republican banner. In 1855 he went to Fontenelle, Nebraska, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 1856-’57 he represented his district in the State Legislature. In 1859 he crossed the plains to Denver, Colorado, where he established the Rocky Mountain News, the first newspaper published in that place. He afterward published the Commonwealth and Republican, and other papers in different points of the State. In 1886 he removed to California, and settled in Los Gatos, where he now resides.
Frank W., the subject of this sketch, received his education in the public schools and in the Denmark Academy, at Denmark, and located in Lee County, Iowa. In 1868 he went to Fremont, Nebraska, where he engaged in the book and stationery business for a little more than a year. He then sold out his business, and went to northern Nebraska, where he engaged in general merchandise for one year. In 1870 he came to San Francisco, California, where he joined an expedition to Victoria, British Columbia, which was then being organized in consequence of the Jim Creek and Peace River gold excitement. From Victoria he went on to the interior of Alaska, where he mined for six months. On his return, in 1871, he stopped at Seattle, and from here he traveled overland through Washington and Oregon to San Francisco. In 1872 he went to Colorado, where he took a contract of twenty-seven miles on the Colorado Central Railroad, with two of his brothers. From there he returned to Nebraska, and engaged in the paint, oil and glass business, in Fremont, until 1880; then engaged in the grocery business until 1882; then in building and renting houses until 1887. In that year he returned to California with his wife, and they traveled over the State in search of a location, returning to Nebraska in the fall. In 1888 they removed to Lake County, California, where they located permanently. He has 440 acres of land, a half mile south of west of Lakeport, on which he has a fine residence and barn; 120 acres are under cultivation, and the whole under fence. He has about fifteen acres planted in fruit trees and vines. Water for domestic use and stock is brought through pipes from a clear cool spring in the mountains. A portion of Mr. Gibson’s land lies adjoining the corporate limits of Lakeport, which he has subdivided into town lots, and which he offers for sale at a remarkably low figure. Mr. Gibson has adopted a novel feature in the sale of his residence lots, which consists of giving one lot to any party building on the same and selling them the adjoining lot at a low price if he want to buy, making a nice home for little money. Mr. Gibson also owns 440 acres of land in Pierce County, Nebraska, adjoining the town of Pierce, the county-seat of Pierce County. A portion of this land is also within the city limits, and is also laid out in town lots, and given away and sold the same as the above. He has fine business lots in the most desirable part of the city, and some fine lots in the heart of the city of Fremont, Nebraska, the county-seat of Lodge County, which he will sell on easy terms.
Mr. Gibson has very appropriately named his beautiful property in Lake County, “Glenwood Ranch,” with his beautiful addition to Lakeport as Glenwood Place. He has published a fine folder with maps, with the ranch subdivided, showing the locality and giving the practical points of the county. Mr. Gibson has now a nice cannery on the ranch, known as the Lakeport Canning Company, canning all kinds of fruit, and making a specialty of canning figs, something new for California, and his best brand, known as his Glenwood Ranch brand, one can always depend on being straight goods.
He was married in 1873, to Miss Helen Lewis, a daughter of Daniel and Catherine (Conrad) Lewis. They have two children: Birdie and Cora, both attending school in Lakeport. He is a member of the I.O.O.F., and has filled all the chairs in the subordinate, and taken all the degrees in the encampment and canton.

Transcribed by Kathy Sedler


GILETTE, CHARLES


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Scioto County, Ohio in 1838. When he was seventeen years of age he engaged as apprentice to the tinner's trade, which he followed in his native county until 1861, at which time he enlisted as a private in the Civil War in the 1st Ohio Regiment. After four months he returned home, and in October 1861, started for California. He came via Pamana, and arrived at San Francisco November 28th of the above year. The first winter was spent in Yolo County, and the following spring he went to Virginia City, Nevada; and after a short time he returned to Woodland, Yolo County, and opened the pioneer tin shop in that place. Here he remained until the fall of 1864 when he went to Solano County, where he remained until the fall of 1864, when he went to Solano County, where well-boring was prosecuted for about two years. We next find Mr. Gilette in Berryessa Valley, Napa County, where about one year was spent. He then went to the Zem Zem Springs, and spent about two years, when he returned to Suisun, where he engaged in the livery business for about six months. He then took charge of the Roberts House in that place for about one year. He then returned to Napa County, and spent about two and a half years at Zem Zem Springs, after which he followed an engineer's life in the California Mine, near Knowxville, for one year. He then went to the Buckeye Quicksilver Mine in Colusa County where he was employed as engineer until the spring of 1875. The following three years were spent on Cache Creek, in Lake County, engaged in wool growing. In the fall of 1879 he settled on his present place, located in the lowere end of Long Valley, which he calls "Live Oak Nook." Mr. Gillett married, in November 1875, Miss Caroline Pierce, a native of Kentucky, daughter of Henry Pierce, then chief engineer of the San Francisco Mint. She died November 18. 1878 leaving two living children, Elizabeth and Caroline. Caroline died November 27, 1878, aged one month and twenty days.

Contributed by Margaret Hinton


GOLDSMITH, William C.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Of all the old pioneers of Lake County no one is more generally and favorably known than the subject of this sketch. Mr. Goldsmith was born in Knox County, Indiana, April 2, 1830. In 1830, with his parents, he moved to Morgan County, Illinois. Here he learned the saddler's trade, which he followed until 1852, when he came to California. He crossed the plains with ox-teams, and arrived at Hangtown (Placerville) August 8th of that year. Of course, he dashed into mining - everbody did that, then --and followed it until the spring of 1853, when he went to Santa Clara County and engaged in farming for the next two years. He then went to Grass Valley, Nevada County, and resided there until August, 1857. He then came to Lake County and located where Lower Lake now stands, and engaged in farming and stock raising for the next six years. He then engaged in hotel and saloon keeping, which he followed till 1881, since which time he has been unemployed. No laudatory words are necessary at our hands, for Mr. Goldsmith is too well known by all the good people of Lake County. He was married, May 31, 1860, to Miss Martha C. Asbill, and their living children are, John H., Elizabeth J., William L., Arthur H., and Edna M. They have lost three, Willie, Charles and Ernest.




GOODWIN, Charles


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 236-237

The subject of this sketch was born in Ontario County, New York, October 8, 1816. When he was eight years of age his parents moved to Detroit, Michigan, whither young Goodwin accompanied them. Here the boy was not idle but set himself vigorously at work to obtain an education, and how well he succeeded is evidenced by the fact, that at the very early age of sixteen we find him engaged in teaching, which profession he followed for the succeeding seven years, when, on account of failing health, he connected himself with E. and J. Wilber & Co., wholesale hardware dealers, as a traveling salesman, and remained in that position for the following two years. In the spring of 1850 he started for California across the plains, coming as far as the Truckee River with horse teams. At that point they met with the misfortune of having all their horses stolen by the Indians. Mr. Goodwin then set out to accomplish the remainder of the trip on foot, and arrived at Nevada City, California, October 10, 1850, without a dollar in his pocket. Like all other old timers Mr. Goodwin was engaged in various pursuits, among which may be mentioned mining, auctioneering and teaming, until the spring of 1856, when he came to Lake County and settled in Big Valley, where he has since continued to reside. He now owns about three hundred acres of land, located at the extreme lower end of Big Valley and near Clear Lake, where he is engaged in farming and wool growing. Mr. Goodwin is one of those active, stirring men who pushed out to the very vanguard of civilization, and has always given his best energies to the advancement and upbuilding of the community in which he resides. He was united in marriage, March 24, 1880, with Mrs. R. J. Arnold, a native of Missouri.




GRAHAM, Nathan


From "History of Mendocino and Lake Counties" 1914

The several members of the Graham family whose extensive land holdings and agricultural interests have made them so well known in the Bachelor Valley precinct are among the most respected residents of their section of Lake county, where Nathan Graham, the head of this thrifty family, settled over thirty years ago. He is of Scotch descent, though his parents, Robert and Catherine (Wilkinson) Graham, were both natives of England, the father born in Yorkshire. The Grahams have been farmers and stockmen for generations

Robert and Catherine (Wilkinson) Graham were married in England, and had one child when they came to America. He had learned the trade of mason and followed it in his native country, but on settling in the United States engaged in farming, in Jefferson county, N. Y. About ten years after leaving England he returned on a visit, and also to get some money which he had inherited, but he took passage back to America on an ill-fated sailing vessel which encountered a severe windstorm when within sight of New York harbor and was wrecked on a sand bar, going down with all on board. She was so near the end of her voyage that she was waiting for a pilot to take her safely into port. In those days there were none of the conveniences and safeguards of modern banking, and Robert Graham had all his money on his person, so that it was lost with him. His wife was left with seven children, five sons and two daughters, vz.: John,, now deceased, who was a farmer in New York state; M.W., deceased, who was a farmer and ranchman in Kansas; Robert Burns, a retired merchant, living at Peabody, Kans.; Nancy, who died unmarried; Mary E., deceased, who was married and had three children (she resided in Pinckney, N. Y.); Joseph B., deceased, a farmer, who lived near Watertown, N. Y.; and Nathan, who was but ten months old at the time of his father's death. The mother remarried, and lived to the age of seventy, dying at Limerick, Jefferson county.

Nathan Graham was born September 30, 1835, in Jefferson county, N.Y., and grew up on the home farm in that county, obtaining such education as the common schools of the time afforded. Meantime he also assisted with the work at home, where he remained until twenty-three years old, at which time he came west to California, engaging in farming in Merced county, where he was located for seven years. At the end of that period he returned east and was married in his native county to Miss Mary E. Richardson, who like himself was born there, daughter of John and Levantia (Brigham) Richardson. Her parents were natives of Paris, Oneida county, N.Y., and the father lived to the age of seventy-five years, the mother dying at sixty-eight. They had two children, Mary E. and John J., the latter still living on the Richardson farm, in the house where he was born. Tilly Richardson, Mrs. Graham's grandfatherr, was born in Massachusetts, was a soldier in the Revolution, and lived to the advanced age of ninety-three years, bright and active to the end of his days. He married young, and had one hundred and twenty-three descendants at the time of his death.

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Graham remained ten years in Jefferson county, N.Y., where he carried on farming. Selling his property he then moved with his family to Minnesota, where one of his brothers was living, but he remained there only six months, finding the climate too cold. Having another brother in Kansas, he went down to that state to investigate conditions, but concluded the windstorms there made it undesirable and took a train out from Omaha to Sacramento, Cal., where he arrived in January, 1879. After spending three weeks in that city he proceeded to Dixon in Solano county, where he made a stay of three months, meantime learning something of the attractions which Lake county offered to settlers. He was so well impressed after looking over this section, having come to Big Valley about June, 1879, that he brought his family and soon bought an eighty-acre ranch near Finley. He improved the property considerably during the three years it remained in his possession, and then sold it at an advance of $25 per acre, moving from there to his present home, in Bachelor valley, where he purchased five hundred acres from the Farmers' Savings Bank of Lakeport, and later two hundred and sixty acres more, adjoining, from the Spring Valley Water Company. The place was in early days an old Indian rancheria owned by a tribe of Digger Indians, and it abounds in relics and evidences of Indian days. Twenty-nine years ago Mr. Graham set out a fifteen-acre prune orchard which is still bearing. Though he has cultivated his land to some extent he has given his attention principally to stock, and his success in all his undertakings justifies his faith in Lake county land and its possibilities. His motto and advice to others has been: "Get land; get land, and never let go a handful of sand". After a life of well directed industry he is still interested in the progress and development of his adopted county, and he and his wife are among its most esteemed old citizens, those who have done their share in the steady work of improvement which has been going on throughout the period of their residence here. Mr. Graham is a Socialist on public questions, a man who has the welfare of all his fellow men at heart and who has thought earnestly and deeply on matters affecting the general good.

A family of four children has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Graham: Wiullis N., who is a farmer and sheep raiser in Bachelor Valley; Clinton R., also a farmer in the valley; John J., who is engaged in agricultural pursuits in partnership with his brother Willis; and Levantia, wife of William H. Arps, a baggageman on the Southern Pacific road and residing in Oakland.



GRAHAM, Willis N.


From "History of Mendocino and Lake Counties" 1914

The brothers Willis N. and John J. Graham are large landowners and sheep raisers in the Bachelor Valley precinct of Lake county, and also hold a large acreage in the Forty Spring valley on Bartlett mountain, their operations having increased steadily during the last few years. They have four hundred acres of tillable land and to some extent are engaged in its cultivation, but the greater part of their attention is given to the sheep business, and they have prospered by hard work, enterprising methods and the exercise of good judgment in their transactions, using their heads as well as their hands in caring for the interests they have acquired. Typical representatives of the Graham family and the sturdy, intelligent Scotch stock from which they spring, they are known for their sagacity, progressive ideas and practical application of their principles to the affairs of everyday life, and are counted among the highly desirable citizens of the county in which their home and business interests lie.
A son of Nathan Graham, one of the most respected residents of Lake county, Willis N. Graham was born July 13, 1868, at Worthville, Jefferson county, N. Y., and was about ten years old when his father moved his family to Minnesota. They were there only a few months, however, coming to Lake county in 1879, and as his father's assistant Willis Graham became familiar with ranch life and the details of the various interests his father had acquired. The latter bought seven hundred and sixty acres in the county, and his son Clinton R. Graham holds a deed in escrow for fifty acres of this property, and his daughter, Bertha L. Arps, has the title to one hundred acres, the remaining six hundred and ten acres being held by Willis N. and John J. Graham. Four hundred acres of this land are adapted for agricultural purposes. Since 1904 these brothers have also homesteaded and bought six hundred acres in Forty Spring valley, on Bartlett mountain, on which they keep their cattle and sheep in the summer season, bringing their herds and flocks to Bachelor valley for the winter. They are breeding high-grade Percheron horses, Durham cattle, Poland china hogs and Ramboulette sheep. The brothers are hard workers, and have been successful in the various lines which have engaged their attention. Their principal crops are potatoes and beans and they have a fifteen-acre prune orchard now nearly thirty years old which is still bearing. Like his father and brother, Willis N. Graham is a Socialist in sentiment.
In 1898 Mr. Graham married Miss Elsie Morrison, daughter of Samuel Morrison. She died leaving one child, Elsie, who lives with her maternal grandmother in East Upper Lake precinct. Mr. Graham's second marriage, which took place in 1900, was to Miss Sylvia Dunton, daughter of Jerome B. and Malinda A. (Goff) Dunton, who reside at Lodi, San Joaquin County, where Mr. Dunton is a successful vineyardist. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Graham, Freda, Nathan, Ross and Dorris. Their home is on the Ukiah road, three miles west of Upper Lake.



GREENE, Willis Elihu


Autobiography

I was born in Kirksville, Mo., on September 21st, 1849. My mother was then twenty years old. Her maiden name was Mary Ann Moody. She was born in Kentucky, and her Mother's maiden name was Turner. Her father was Daniel Moody. My grandmother Moody died in Missouri along about 1860. My Grandfather Moody re-married and moved to Texas and died there at about the age of eighty years.
My father, William Woods Greene, was raised in Macon County, Mo. His father, Willis Eliott Greene, was born in Virginia in the year 1796, and died in Lake County, California, in the year 1892. He had two brothers in Missouri, Allen and Wesley, who died in Missouri. My father came to CAlifornia in 1850, around the Horn, and returned to Missouri by the way of Panama in 1852.
In the spring of 1853, a company of ninety persons was organized in Missouri and we crossed the plains in a covered wagon, landing in Auburn, Placer County, California, in September of that year. In our family were the following persons: my father and mother, my sister Puss De Jarnatt, and myself, my grandfather Greene and his other sons and daughters, namely: Alfred, Tant, Tobe, Duff, Kittie and Bettie. Included in our family was the wives of my Uncle Alfred and Tant; they were sisters and their maiden name was Sloan. All of this generation are now dead.
From Auburn we scattered. My father and mother and us two children went to Michigan Bluffs, Placer County, and for awhile my mother kept a boarding house. We lived in and about Michigan Bluff a year or so. Near this place there was a place then known as Sage Hill, where my sister, Mrs. Belle Thompson, was born April 3rd, 1854.
From there we went up to Main Top, about eight or ten miles north of Michigan Bluff, and built a road house out of shakes. This was in 1856, and my sister Alice White was born there. We did not do very well there. My mother got a job cooking at the Fork's House, which is about two miles north of Main Top.
In the fall of 1858 we left the Fork's House with a spike mule team for Stony Creek, Colusa County, California, where my Uncles, Alfred and Tant, with their families and grandfather Greene and Uncle Duff, the latter about eighteen years old, lived with my grandfather. All except Duff had Possessory Claims in ranches. It was through their solicitation that we went there.
After wintering there, my father and mother concluded they would locate on the place now known as Stony Ford. The land was unsurveyed and we built a log house without nails; the neighbors got together and built it in one day. We were fifty miles from Post Office and Market. Colusa was our Post Office and market. In the year 1860 my brother Frank was born in this log house, where we lived until the fall of 1862. While living on this Stony Ford ranch, I think it was the toughest time and greatest hardships I ever experienced. While we had stock of hogs, cattle and horses and being so far from market, we often ran out of supplies such as sugar, coffee and flour.
In the fall of 1862 we moved to Bear Valley, Colusa County, California, renting the Stephen Reese ranch. It was while living on this ranch that I saw the first sewing machine and mower.
In 1864 there was a coppy excitement on Little Stony Creek, and the little town of Ashton sprung up. We moved up there from Bear Valley and built a boarding house; within a year this all blew up.
In the year 1865 we moved to the town of Colusa, bought the Old American Hotel of Mrs. Lightner, tore down the building at Ashton and used the material to build an addition onto the American Hotel. It was there I was a busy boy. I milked two cows, cared for a span of horses, waited on the table, washed dishes and went to school. On Saturdays I hauled down wood from ranches near town. It was in Colusa that I got my grammar school education; no high schools then. In the fall of 1868 I went to the Hesperian College at Woodland, also in the spring of 1869.
After coming back from school I obtained a teachers certificate and taught school in Antelope Valley, in the spring of 1870. Not satisfied with this avocation I went into the Eureka Hotel with my father and mother. My father sold the Eureka Hotel and moved to Kelseyville. I followed and landed in Kelseyville on February 22nd, 1871. There I engaged in general merchandise, associated with Hosiah Smith.
On May 1st, 1872, I married Sarah A. Jamison, on the Jamison Ranch located seven miles from Kelseyville on the road to Lower Lake.
In the year 1873 I retired from the firm of Smith & Greene. In the spring of 1875 I planted a hop yard on the Shirley Ranch in Big Valley, which I cultivated for five years. In 1877 I again engaged in the general merchandise business at Kelseyville, with John C. Mendenhall, under the firm name of Mendenhall & Greene, and retired in 1878.
In the fall of 1879 I moved to Lakeport and was appointed Deputy County Clerk under H. A. Oliver. When Peter Burtnett took the Sheriff's Office in March 1880, I was appointed Deputy and acted as Under-Sheriff during his term. After Sheriff Burtnett retired from the Sheriff's Office in January 1883, I, with C. E. Phelan, rented twenty acres of land from D. V. Thompson at Upper Lake and planted it in hops. We raised hops for two years. We lost in our venture and Phelan quit and I continued on with ten acres for twelve more years and did very well. Some of these years the price was below cost of production. The highest price I secured was thirty-two and a half cents per pound, and the lowest eight cents, but on the whole I came out ahead.
In 1885 I joined with my mother in running the Lake View Hotel (known then as the Greene Hotel). In 1886 my mother sold the hotel to W. J. Butler and I opened a furniture store on Main Street in Lakeport, California. There I had a fire, but was fully covered by insurance. I opened again on3rd Street and added shoes to the business, and afterwards sold the furniture business and moved the shoes to the Levy Block, then sold the shoes to A. Levy.
On August 15, 1891 I was, by the Board of Directors of the Bank of Lake, elected Assistant Cashier thereof and shortly thereafter was elected cashier, which position I held until I resigned in November 1907.
On January 1st, 1908 I moved to Santa Rosa and have been living here, retired, ever since.
As I have already said, I was married to Sarah Ann Jamison on May 1st, 1872. She was born on March 13th, 1853 in Jefferson County, Missouri, and passed away on November 12th, 1929. She was the daughter of J. H. Jamison and M. A. Jamison; both have passes away. The family, I think, came to California in 1856 and settled at Bidwells Bar, afterwards moving to Solano County and then to Lake County. To our union there were born four children, namely: Fred A. Greene, Rosa Belle Greene (now Monroe), Dudley W. Greene, and Zella M. Greene. Fred A. and Rosa Belle were born in Kelseyville; Dudley W. and Zella M. in Lakeport.
I have seven grandchildren, namely: Maurice Monroe (now Reinking), Loyd Monroe, Mildred Greene, (now Bishop), Wanda Greene, Adra Greene, Dudley J. Greene and Rosalee Greene; also one great grandchild, Sara Ann Reinking.
In writing this biography, I have no notes to refer to; it is entirely from memory at this writing. I have past eighty-five years and have only attempted to give the dates of where I was and what I was doing all these eighty-five years.
There are many things I could relate of the ups and down, and I have attempted to be as brief as possible. I have always tried to be truthful, honest and just, and I think I have; let others be the judge. This is the way I taught my children and I think they are following my teaching. I can truthfully say I was never arrested, never sued, and personally never sued anyone.

Dated at Santa Rosa,
January 9th, 1935
Willis E. Greene


GREENE, W. W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 234-235

Was born in Howard County, Missouri, January 22, 1827. Here he grew up on a farm and resided until 1850, when he crossed the plains to California, and arrived at Hangtown July 28th of that year. He engaged in mining in El Dorado County for about one month, and then went to Placer County and engaged in merchandising in company with two others, for about six months. He then went twelve miles below Sacramento and engaged in farming. At the end of four months he disposed of his interest there and went to Rough and Ready, in Nevada County, and again embarked in merchandising, where he continued until June, 1851. He then moved his stock of goods to Auburn, Placer County, and continued merchandising for about eight months. He then closed out and followed teaming until January, 1853, when he returned to Missouri via Panama. He started from San Francisco in company with Judge Wallace, now of Napa County, but at Acapulco they separated, Wallace going through Mexico and Mr. Greene via Panama. In April, 1853, he started from Missouri, accompanied by his father, two sisters and three brothers, his wife and two children, bound to California with ox-teams, and arrived in El Dorado County in the following October. He settled at Auburn, Placer County, and engaged in hotel-keeping and teaming until the fall of 1858, when he moved to Colusa County and engaged in the stock business, which he followed until 1865. He then moved to the town of Colusa and engaged in hotel-keeping until the spring of 1868. He then went to Oregon and bought horses and sold them in San Francisco. In the fall of 1868 he engaged in merchandising in Colusa under the firm name of Greene, Murray & Co., which he continued for one year. He then sold out and built what is known as the Eureka Hotel, which he conducted until the spring of 1871. He then moved to Lake County and engaged in merchandising in company with his brother, A.D. Greene, at Kelseyville. In April, 1872, he leased the Bartlett Springs and conducted them for one year. During this time he purchased the Lake View Hotel at Lakeport, and in October, 1872, he moved to that place, where he has since resided, being engaged in hotel-keeping. He has changed the name of the house to Greene's Hotel. He was married, July 23, 1846, to Miss Mary A. Moody, a native of Kentucky. The children are, Martha A., Willis E., Isabell M., Alice G. and Frank A.



GRUWELL, L. H.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 237-238

Whose portrait will be found in the body of this work, was born in Quincy, Illinois, November 22, 1836. When still a child his parents moved to Iowa, where his father was engaged in farming till the spring of 1849. In that year the father of Mr. Gruwell, with his family, crossed the plains with ox-teams to California, coming in on the southern route from Salt Lake City, arriving at Los Angeles in December of that year. Soon after arriving the father, with his family, moved to El Dorado County, and remained until the fall of 1851, when they went to San Jose, where they engaged in farming. In the meantime young Gruwell attended the Pacific University for one year. In 1857, then a young man of twenty-one, he came to Lake County, then a part of Napa County, and speculated in stock until 1861, when he went to Mendocino County, and bought a ranch in Sherwood Valley, continuing to purchase stock for market in the counties of Sonoma, Marin, Lake and Mendocino; also, making trips to the southern counties, buying and driving cattle to San Francisco.
In the fall of 1863 he sold his place in Mendocino County, and returned to Lake, where he married Miss Lizzie Lyons, daughter of Judge Lyons, who is still a resident of this county, and formerly a resident of Pennsylvania, where the daughter was born. In the fall of 1866 he moved, and settled on Stoney Creek in Colusa County, where he followed stock raising and speculating for a number of years. In 1872 he removed to Siskiyou County (now Modoc), where he successfully followed the same business till the spring of 1873. On the 15th of January of that year his wife died, leaving four small children, the youngest but a few weeks old. In a few months thereafter he returned to Lake County with his little family, locating at Lower Lake. In 1874 he married Miss Mattie McClintock, a native of California, and daughter of J. T. McClintock, of Scotts Valley, where he now resides. Soon after locating at Lower Lake he became interested in the stage lines from that place to Calistoga, which he followed for three years, when he sold out his interest, and has since given his attention to the livery business. He owns at present three hundred and seventy-four acres of farming land, one and a half miles from Lower Lake, and his livery stable and house and lot in town.
Mr. Gruwell served for three months as Supervisor under appointment by the Superior Judge. The able manner in which he discharged his duties secured his election to the position November 2, 1880, by a majority clearly showing the high estimation in which he is held by the public. He has also manifested a lively interest and taken a very active part in the organization of the Lake County Agricultural Society, giving the use of the grounds for the exhibition free, and was elected its first president, which office he now holds for the second term.
He has had a family of six children, four by his first wife: Millie, Robert L., Calla and Lizzie, the last-named dying at the age of four years and four months. By his second wife he has two children, both girls: Alla and Katie. Mr. Gruwell has a well-knit form, indicating great physical power, weighing some two hundred or more pounds. It will be observed by reference to his portrait that he is a man of an iron will and determination of purpose, with a vital force sufficient to accomplish successfully whatever he undertakes.



"H"

J. M. HAMILTON


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 245-246

Was born in Philadelphia, December, 1820. His parents died when he was quite young, and most of his early years were spent at school. After finishing a collegiate course preparatory to applying himself to the study of medicine, he visited a brother-in-law in Delaware who was farming near New Castle, where he became so much pleased with the life of a farmer, he determined to adopt that as his own vocation. He lived with this gentleman, D.W. Gemmill, until his marriage in 1841, when he began farming on his own account. In June, 1846, he left Delaware for the purpose of visiting Texas, and spent the remainder of that year until December in traveling through the western part of the State, from Galveston to the Rio Grande, and returned to New York by sea. After his return to Delaware he decided upon reading law, and for a time was a student with Hon. J. M. Clayton. In 1850 he was appointed Assistant United States Marshal for Delaware. The succeeding winter he accepted a proposition from another brother-in-law, the late Captain A. A. Ritchie, to come to California and engage in farming on the Suisun Rancho in Solano County, then just purchased by Ritchie and Waterman. In April, 1851, he left Philadelphia with his wife and two children for California; and after a pleasant voyage of one hundred and thirty-five days around Cape Horn in the ship "Tartar," Captain Webber, arrived in San Francisco August 22d. On his arrival, learning that settlers had taken possession of most of the land in Suisun, and not wishing to be drawn into any controversy with them, he bought a farm in Napa Valley, a short distance from Napa City, settled there, and engaged in farming until the fall of 1860, when he became interested in quicksilver mining in Pope Valley. In the fall of 1865 he moved with his family over to the stone house in Coyote Valley, and engaged in farming and general stock raising. At the organization of the State Grange Patrons of Husbandry, in Napa City, July, 1873, he was elected to the officer of Overseer.
At the meeting of the State Grange in San Jose, in October of the same year, he was elected by an almost unanimous vote to the position of Worthy Master for two years. As representative of the Patrons of this State, he attended the meetings of the National Grange in St. Louis, in 1874, and Charleston, South Carolina, in 1875. In March, 1854, he assisted in the formation in Napa City of the first agricultural society in California, and was elected as its president. He came into what is now Lake County (then a part of Napa) for the first time, October, 1851. At that time there was not a white person making this his home. The old Kelsey adobe, and a log house near where the present stone house in Coyote Valley now stands, were the only buildings that had been reared by white men. Until the time he came into the county to make it his permanent home, business or pleasure called him here frequently, and he has not been absent from it for more than a few months at any one time since his first visit. He claims to be the oldest living resident of Lake County. In the fall of 1858 he was appointed County Superintendent of Schools for Napa County, which then included the whole of this territory. This position he held for several years. He divided this portion of the county into school districts, examined applicants, and gave certificates of qualification for teachers, and set the machinery of the public school system into operation. For more than twenty-five years he has been in some office of trust and responsibility, frequently holding several at the same time, in Napa and Lake Counties; and the satisfaction he has given in the discharge of his duties is evidence of his ability and integrity. He now lives near Guenoc, and is engaged in the practice of law.



HANSON, David M.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 246-247

Was born in Coles County, Illinois, December 21, 1840. He came to California with his parents in 1849. He received his education at the Pacific University, Santa Clara County, and at the Emery and Henry College, Washington County, Virginia. He studied law in the office of Zach. Montgomery, in Marysville, California, and was admitted to the bar in 1861. He was appointed Clerk of the United States District Court, under Judge G. N. Mott, and filled that position at Virginia City, Nevada, for three years. He then began the practice of law, associated with Judge Jesse S. Pitzer. In 1864, he moved to Clear Lake, purchasing the property now known as the Ritchie ranch in Long Valley. In 1866, in partnership with I. C. McQuaid, Esq., he went to Idaho and engaged in the practice of law. In 1867, he engaged in the publication of the Clear Lake "Sentinel", at Lower Lake, and for a number of years, associated with his father, he continued in the newspaper business, publishing successively the Clear Lake "Sentinel," Sutter County "Sentinel,", Marysville "Evening Telegraph", and Gilroy "Advocate." He then retired from the business and located permanently at his home in Lake County, where he engaged in sheep raising and the practice of law. In 1878, he was elected to the position of District Attorney, which he filled with due credit to himself and the entire satisfaction of the people. Mr. Hanson is well and extensively known in Lake County, having canvassed it in the discussion of public questions. He now resides on his place which he has appropriately named the "Valley Ranch," in Lake County, three miles east of the celebrated Sulphur Bank. From his residence a grand view is afforded of Clear Lake and Lakeport. He has a wife and two children, and with the favor of Providence lives contentedly with the promise of happiness and contentment in future store.



HANSON, Hon. George M.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 247-250

The life of this gentleman was a long and eventful one. His California history is familiar to many of the first immigrants to this State. As he was not only one of the early immigrants to this coast, but also a pioneer of the Clear Lake region, we cannot give a complete chronicle of the early history of Lake County without the assistance of Mr. Hanson's experiences here.
George M. Hanson, whose portrait will be found in the body of this work, was born in Tazewell County, Virginia, March 13, 1799. In the year 1819 he married Miss Polly Ellington, at Lebanon, Russell County, Virginia, and became the father of seven sons and three daughters, all of whom reached the age of maturity, and six of whom survive him. His oldest and only living daughter is Elizabeth, the wife of Captain J. G. Allender, of Watsonville. His sons now living are, William P., an early settler of this county, now a resident of Willows, Colusa County; Nathan E., James Francis, Daniel A. and David M., all of whom are at present and for many years have been living among the scenes of Clear Lake. For twenty-six years Frank has lived on his present ranch at the head of Long Valley.
Two years after his marriage the subject of this sketch moved to Kentucky and engaged in the mercantile business for a short time; thence he emigrated to Clark County, Illinois, at that time a wild, unsettled country, and there lived for twenty-five years, much of that time being spent in public life. Being a man of exemplary habits and scrupulous integrity, his worth was soon recognized in his community, and he was directly called to serve as a legislator. He soon became prominent, and was regarded by all as one of the leading men in the halls of legislation. He served twelve consecutive years in the House and Senate of Illinois, and was intimately acquainted and associated with the men who subsequently became so famous in the history of that State and of the nation. He was in the Senate of Illinois at the time Abraham Lincoln made his first appearance as a legislator, and his reminiscences of the Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas of that day were of peculiar interest.
During the year 1847 Mr. Hanson visited Texas, and traveled all over that State on a tour of inspection with the view of moving there and making a permanent settlement should the country suit him. Not being favorably impressed with it, however, he returned home, and the following year began preparations for a trip across the continent with his family, having then in view the territory of Oregon, which country at that time was attracting considerable attention. Before he started, however, the news of the discovery of gold in California came and changed his plans. In April, 1849, Mr. Hanson drove out of Coles County, Illinois, with three ox-teams, and a family carriage drawn by horses, headed for the new El Dorado of the Pacific. His ox-teams were loaded with an assorted stock of goods of several thousand dollars' value which he thought would be suited to the requirement of the miners of '49. Emigrants of that day rendezvoused at Independence, Missouri, where they formed themselves into companies consisting generally of thirty or forty teams, which were called trains, each train electing a captain, whose duty it was to take a general rule and direction of all matters connected with the interests of the company, and to facilitate as much as possible their journey to the land of gold and anticipated fortunes. The train with which Mr. Hanson cast his lot consisted of about one hundred persons, having only three women - Mrs. George M. Hanson, his daughter Mrs. Sidney Linder, and Mrs. John Armstrong - and about one dozen children, with an aggregate of some thirty-five wagons and teams, and a few extra oxen and milch cows, which were driven in front of the train of wagons that followed at specified distances apart as regulated by the captain. John G. Allender, who after his arrival at California became a son-in-law of Mr. Hanson, was duly elected captain of this train. Owing to his experience with teams, his peculiar social qualities and unrivaled memory of past events, he became very popular and never failed to interest and entertain his company around the camp-fires. The objects the emigrants had in thus traveling in companies was protection against hostile and predatory Indians, and mutual assistance when difficulties had to be met and overcome. We will not attempt to follow Mr. Hanson across the Rocky Mountains, the burning desert sands, and over the lofty Sierras, and relate the thrilling incidents of that early emigration, or portray the trying vicissitudes that so frequently beset his path. Suffice it to say that after untold trials, hardships and suffering he arrived at Yuba City, Sutter County, in the month of November, 1849, in destitute circumstances, having lost and left everything in the mountain fastnesses and snows of the Sierras.
At Yuba City he, for a short time, kept a hotel; then built a ferry boat, connecting Yuba City and Marysville across the Feather River. Within two or three years he built a bridge across the river at a cost of $30,000, which was carried away by the floods a few years thereafter. He then sold an interest in his toll franchise to John C. Fall, of Marysville, and together they built, at a very heavy cost, another bridge. This was very valuable property, the receipts of toll being from $75 to $150 per diem. A few years after this, by an Act of Legislature, the authorities of the county were authorized to erect a free bridge, in the face of the franchise held by Mr. Hanson, which was granted him for a period of twenty years, guaranteeing him protection of the same.
Politically Mr. Hanson had ever been an old line Whig, and when the Republican party came into existence, and held its National Convention in 1856, at Philadelphia, at which John C. Fremont was nominated for President, Mr. Hanson attended that body as a delegate from California. At that convention Mr. Hanson paid the lamented Lincoln a tribute of respect by putting his name before that body as a candidate for Vice-President, at the same time addressing a pleasant compliment towards him. The following National Convention of that party having nominated Mr. Lincoln for President, Mr. Hanson was a warm and active supporter of that ticket. He made his influence felt upon the stump and in the columns of political papers. Mr. Hanson was a very effective, ready debater, and clear and forcible writer. But few men of his day were better read in general politics, and who more clearly understood the system and ideas of our form of government. After Mr. Lincoln's election Mr. Hanson was notified by that distinguished gentleman that he was wanted to discharge the duties of some governmental office on this coast by the incoming administration. Notwithstanding his repeated assertions to the President that he was not desirous of official position, Mr. Lincoln, unsolicited, sent him a commission as Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Northern District of California, which office he entered upon and discharged the duties of during that administration.
After the assassination of Abraham Lincoln Mr. Hanson retired to private life again, and although his accumulated years admonished him to forsake the pursuits of active life, his restless spirit and indomitable energy induced him to again resume business. He then, in company with his youngest son, David M., a lawyer, went into the newspaper business, publishing the Clear Lake "Sentinel," Sutter County "Sentinel," Marysville "Evening Telegraph," "Daily Appeal," and finally the Gilroy "Advocate," which publication ended his long and active career in business.
Mr. Hanson was among the first white men who penetrated the Coast Range Mountains as far as Clear Lake. Having a large family of sons, most of whom had grown to man's estate, he was desirous of finding homes for them and settling down to some steady pursuit. In 1853 or 1854, it was, that Mr. Hanson came in sight of the waters of Clear Lake, and after thoroughly prospecting the country, concluded that this was the very place he was looking for to find homes for his boys. He first settled them at Upper Lake, on Middle Creek and its vicinity, stocking their several places with horses, cattle, and hogs. While en route to the lake over the pathless mountains just west of Wilbers Sulphur Springs, on evening, Mr. Hanson shot and killed an enormous grizzly bear. This was near the head of what has ever since been known as "Grizzly Canon," through which an excellent county road now passes, and from which incidents that canon and road derives the name of "Grizzly Canon". In those early times large game was very abundant in this country. The pioneers could at all hours of the night hear the savage snarling and deep growling of the grizzly, with the piercing scream of the panther or California lion. The Hanson boys have seen as many as fifty deer in a drove, hundreds of elk in a bank, ad the killing of grizzly bears and California lions was of such common occurrence as to attract no attention whatever. Since the year 1854, Mr. Hanson's sons have lived on and in the vicinity of Clear Lake, and this county has had for him in consequence thereof, all the attractions of a home. His visits hither, when not permanently settled, were of yearly occurrence until 1874. After he had retired from business, he came to Lake County, the scene of his many early and exciting adventures, to live among his children and grand-children, and in its salubrious climate pass the few remaining days of his life. In 1877, the great affliction of his life in the shape of physical infirmity befell him. He lost his eyesight and became almost absolutely blind from cataract. This to him was an inconsolable bereavement, as it deprived him of the ability to read and write, in which occupations he had taken his greatest pleasure. This affliction so worked and wore upon him that his health rapidly began to decline. He became helpless, and that fact so embarrassed him that life almost became a burden. His spirit of independence that had been a characteristic with him, and sustained him throughout his long life, was now utterly crushed, and he regarded his fast approaching dissolution with calm, Christian resignation. He had been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and a respected member of the Masonic fraternity for more than fifty years, and we might safely say that no man ever lived more in consistence with his religious professions and fraternal tenets than did George M. Hanson for a half century of time. In July, 1879, he was taken with pneumonia which baffled the skill of his physicians. In a very few days it was evident that his career on earth must end. His children and grand-children were quickly summoned to attend that awful and solemn event. He was at the house of one of his sons in Long Valley, surrounded by weeping relatives and friends, and at about 9 o'clock P.M. on the 1st day of August, amid the heart-sobs of his devoted children and grand-children, the spirit of this good old man went back to the God who sent it to earth.



HANSON, J. F.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 239

Was born in Coles County, Illinois, June 11, 1833, where he resided with his parents on a farm until he was fourteen years of age, when the family crossed the plains to California, with ox-teams, arriving in the Sacramento Valley in October, 1848. The father's family spent the winter at the Lassen Ranch, while J. F. and his brother, Nathan E., engaged in mining on the Feather River. In the spring of 1849 J. F. went to Yuba City and ran a ferry across the Feather River for about four months. He then engaged in teaming to the mountains for four months, and in the fall he went to Santa Clara, where he attended school till about July 1, 1854. He then returned to Yuba City, and at the end of two weeks came to Lake County in company with his father, D. Brunson, -- Washburne, D. Hamblin, and Daniel Hanson, a brother. This party settled on different places in the vicinity of where Upper Lake now stands. At the end of eighteen months J. F. returned to Yuba City and spent about six months; and in February, 1856, he returned to Lake County and settled where he now resides, in Long Valley, where he owns five hundred and twenty acres. He also has an extensive sheep range in Weldons Valley, near the Sulphur Bank, comprising between one thousand eight hundred and two thousand acres. On his place in Long Valley there is a fine grist and saw mill, which will be found described elsewhere.



HARBIN, J. M.


From autobiography written by John (aka James, "Matt") Harbin. It was published sometime in the San Francisco Examiner

Remarkable autobiography of the man who led the first emigrant train over the Sierra, and who was the first of California’s millionaires.   Weary of the world, he crept into the solitudes of Mexico and for twenty years led the life of a hermit, leaving his retreat only because death seemed near.

THE KING OF THE MOUNTAINS


I suppose I ought to hate the world, but I don’t. It has kicked and cuffed me; it has put its hand in my pocket and stolen all it found there; it has lied to me; it has led me into pitfalls and laughed when I fell; it has ground my heart and racked my brain. But I can’t hate. I distrust.

Twenty years ago, tired of dealing with insincerity, I crept away from it all and turned my face to Nature’s. The twenty years I’ve passed since then, my home in a lonely cave, my friends the stars and the winds and the birds and the honest earth, have been calm and happy. If the end were not near I’d be there yet. I did not leave because my heart has changed its leaning. I still distrust. But I’d rather die with my girl beside me than alone in the wilderness.

Californians know me as Mat Harbin, but my name is John Madison Harbin. (The sketch is identified as James Madison, which is how he appears in everything else. The signature is simply ‘J.M.’) I was born in Warren County, Tennessee, in 1823, and am of English-Scotch descent. In 1839 I left Tennessee and went to Independence, Jackson county, MO. A might good old State, Missouri, and I think of it with a warming of my chilled affection. When I was fourteen I became acquainted with Dr. John Mark, a fur-trader. He told me of California, and my fancy was caught by the pictures he drew of the soft, sunny winters. I hadn’t much poetry in me, but I had a heap of fond-ness for the sunshine; so I thought and thought about the flowery places out there in the warmth, with fleecy clouds drifting over them, and at last I made up my mind to get there if I could. I tried to find some one willing to g o with me, but the trying was hard and the finding long put off. Not until 1844 was I able to make a start. Then I fell in with a party of Irish people who took to the notion with which my heard was filled. We were set upon by our friends, who argued that we couldn’t push through to the ocean, and some declared that we couldn’t make it with a body of 200 armed me, much less unattended. But were were not discouraged. I didn’t fear. In fact, I have never been afraid of anything short of God, and I reckon a fellow hasn’t anything to fear from him as long as he keeps in the middle of the road.

We started for the West May 4, 1844, and trailed the sunset for six months. We had eleven wagons loaded with bacon and flour and drawn by oxen. I was the guide.

When we got to the head of Humboldt river I left the party and struck off alone to find a path through the mountains. I found what I was looking for, and we crossed two miles north of the present line of the Central Pacific. In my search for a pass I discovered Donner lake and named it Little Truckee. I also got a glimpse of Lake Tahoe, which I called Big Truckee. To Truckee river I gave the name which still clings to it. I had with me at the time an Indian whose name was Truckee, and the name seemed good enough for lakes and rivers. Very beautiful those bodies of water were out there in the unbroken wilderness. Maybe the Almighty could improve on them, but he’d have to do it to convince me.

While hunting for the pass my appetite continued good, but my group didn’t continue. Two days before I found a way over the Sierra my supplies were gone. I buckled my stomach to a smaller compass and moved along hour after hour, thinking of all the dishes I liked and of all the spreads I had enjoyed, but seeing nothing worth mentioning except scenery. After going without food for two days, I shot a coyote. It all depends on the cooking and the length of time you’ve been living on the sublimity of towering trees and dizzy chasms. To me that coyote tasted pretty darned good, and now, after the lapse of more than fifty years, the memory of him is green. Here’s looking toward him.

Our party reached Summit valley the latter part of September. There were about eighteen inches of snow on the ground then. The bacon gave out, but we took naturally to beef. Killed an ox every now and then and had him roasted, boiled and fried. At Donner lake we built a cabin and stored provisions. We weren’t sure we could make our way down the mountains, and we had a prejudice against dying in the snow, so we planned to have a retreat open in case of need. Joe Foster and Dennis Martin were left at the cabin. They remained in camp until February and then went on ox-hide snowshoes down the Sierra. They succeeded in getting to Sutter’s Fort. In the cabin we built as a retreat some members of the Donner party afterward perished. After leaving the two men at the lake, the rest of us journeyed forward until we got to the Yuba. There, the snow having become very deep, we left the wagons. Three families also remained. Aunt Mary Murphy was among the number in the second camp. All the others resumed the march and reached Sutter’s Fort. General Sutter provided us with mules and we started back to rescue the waiting few on the Yuba. But the snow was too much for us at first, and had to halt until a crust formed. Then we pushed on to the camp. We found Aunt Mary parching bullock hide for food and taking care of her three weeks old baby, Aunt Mary had some of the real grit in her. She was as one among ten thousand. All of the party had gathered at Sutter’s Fort before December except the men left at Donner lake. Ours was the first emigrant train that ever got their wagons across the Sierra.

I went into special service under Micheltorena, who was first in command of Mexican soldiers in California. I stayed with him four months and then went down the coast to Los Angeles on an exploring expedition. Then I returned to Sutter’s Fort and with a few friends crossed the San Joaquin river. Where Stockton is we killed about 250 elk. The San Joaquin valley I explored to Tulare lake and there made for the mountains and on to the Ventura region. There I discovered gold in gravel. That was in 1845. Hurrying on to Los Angeles, I purchased some iron and made a Georgia rocker. Then returning I took out several hundred dollars worth of gold. The water gave out and I struck into the Sierras in Mariposa county. The Indians drove me back and I went to Old Horn, an Indian chief who lived on Kern river, 200 years from its mouth. He received me kindly and I remained with him four months.

On bidding good-by to Old Horn I journeyed 150 miles south of San Diego and discovered three copper mines. To get titles to them I started north to have a talk with Pio Pico, and found the Bear Flag War under way. For two months I was in hiding at a ranch just below San Bernardino. The war with Mexico soon followed, and I joined the American forces in 1846 under Commodore Stockton and was with the army until peace was established. I commanded the soldiers at the Battle of Chino, forty miles east of Los Angeles, in September, 1846. The fighting lasted two days. The second day a bullet grazed my left ear, and the last ball fired nipped the middle finger of my left hand, leaving it a wreck. I put up a pretty game fight, I reckon, but I was taken prisoner and put in the next five months as a captive in Los Angeles. I had a fever then, and twice they carried me out on a hand -barrow so that I might die in the open. It seems needless to observe that I didn’t die.

While I was in prison my mother and her family arrived in California and settled in Napa county. This moved me to what really was heroic effort, my temperament considered: I wrote my mother the first letter of my life. When she read it she and my young brother held a council of war, and my brother shouldered a gun and started for the front, intent on rescuing me from the Mexicans. To this end he joined the forces of Fremont. Good stuff in that brother of mine, even though he didn't get me out. Well, I got out, nevertheless, for the war ended as all things end, barring trouble and star dust, and when the end came I was honorably discharged from service, General Fremont signing my discharge in the Bell Building, Los Angeles, about March or April 1847.

Soon after I was mustered out I returned north, taking with me 4,650 head of as fine cattle as ever trod the earth, and 700 horses. Of the horses we shall say nothing, please, in this day of the thoroughbred; but there were 700. I concluded it was high time for me to settle down and behave myself, so I bought the Thomas Hardy Mexican land grant at Woodland. It touched the Sacramento river and measured about seventeen miles in length by four miles in width. It was something of a bit of land. The site of Woodland is within the limits of the grant. I had more than that, though, but title to the rest of my ranch I derived directly from the United States. I put in the time from then till 1858 raising cattle and thinking. The herds I had to sell were disposed of to the miners and Sacramento butchers, and I cleaned up $100,000.00 to $150,000.00 a year. Frequently a fat ox brought me in $800.00. I wasn’t backward about pushing my way where the snow lay deep in the winter, and beef was as good as gold if a fellow could get it to the miners when the world was white.

In 1848 I built for others the first Georgia rocker at Mormon island and two at Coloma, just below the old Sutter sawmill. I got $1.00 of every five taken out with the aid of the rockers. During 1848, too, I took a short turn at mining on my own account, and my dust was worth $4,000.00.

Sarah Adams and I liked each other. Then we liked a little better. Then we loved. Then we married. The marriage was in 1850, and death came to Sarah in 1863. My love lives on, and should, for I have found little in this world worth clinging to save the memory of that good woman.

It is a distinction I do not value, but I may as well mention it, now that I am writing of other things: I was the first of the California millionaires. In 1853 my wealth aggregated $3000,000.00. I didn’t let it bother me.

About this time the tide turned and I began to be buffeted by fortune. The Mormons were mixed up in the first blows it gave me. The Mormons were being persecuted, and I reckoned I could help them. I wasn’t a Mormon, and you couldn’t make me one in a thousand years; but I was a man, and they were of my kind, and I felt sorry for them. I couldn’t figure out that they meant any harm, and I could figure out that they were having might hard traveling. So I set to work to do them a good turn, and ended by accomplishing nothing for them a bumping my own head against rocks. I bought the Mosquito Kingdown in Central America and planned to fix it up for the Mormons. I paid $100,000.00 down, and was to pay the remainder of the purchase price within ten years. I supposed I could meet the payments with the increase of my herds.

I started for Utah, expecting to be absent two months, and requiring a little pocked-money I borrowed $45,000.00 from Jim Haggin and Lloyd Tevis, giving them a mortgage on all my property, the note running for three months. I supposed I had arranged sufficiently to have my business attended to right up to the line during my absence, and thought my agent would look after the note should I not be back on the minute. I shouldn’t have supposed any such things, for the suppositions were wrong. I trotted about for nine months, and didn’t tell anybody at home where I was trotting or why. They lost track of me, it seems and the report gained acceptance that I was dead. The note fell due, wasn’t raised, and was sued on. The mortgage was foreclosed, my property fell to Haggin and Tevis, and I got home in time to be of no use at all.

I fiddled, faddied, feedled a bit, but I couldn’t raise money enough to redeem the property, and I couldn’t raise a bean on my kingdom. I was the only man on earth who believed in it, I reckon, and I’m not saying I believed all the time, myself. When I saw that I was downed for good so far as my ranch was concerned I chalked that up as an experience and moved over to Virginia City and began again. This time I engaged in the business of supplying lumber to Virginia City and Gold Hill. IN sic years I was $150,000.00 ahead of the game, but the money was slippery and I couldn’t hold it. It got away and stayed there. Then I went in for oil. I remembered having seen traces of petroleum in Southern California in 1845, and I journeyed to the region and began prospecting. In 1864, that was. I found signs, and wrote to a friend to come down and bring $11,000.00 with him. He did so. We sunk the eleven thousand so deep no man will ever find it. He and I were sleeping in the same room in old Pat Dunn’s hotel at San Luis Obispo the night President Lincoln was shot.

From ‘65 to ‘71 I followed the lumber business on Cobb mountain, Lake county, working more than was good for me and making some money. Then I saw the glimmer of gold, and off I sped. Gold-I mean the virgin gold the mind pictures shinning from sands no foot has trod, gleaming from quartz no had has touched is a beautiful temptress floating on before, beckoning, beckoning, and laughing with promise. When some me catch the outline of her shimmering form they drop everything and follow. Well, I was in those days unable to plod when this fairy beckoned. I hurried to Mexico and put my savings into four abandoned mines in Durango--Vaca, St. Marcus, Socorra and Cabdilla. They were in a group, and had not been worked since 1850. I soon found I hadn’t money enough to get out the pay ore I knew to be there, so I wrote old Fred Warner, the Sacramento butcher, how things stood, and told him he could have the mines if he’d work them, giving me four shares of stock in return for the gift. Fred put in $100,000.00 and in a short time the mines were paying $30,000.00 a month. This they continued to do for several years. As soon as the development began I trailed off among the mountains to await the inflow of the tide, leaving my traps behind me. I lofted around a bit too long, considering the make-up of my good brother’s men, for when I returned I found that some of them had broken into my trunk and taken thence my four shares of stock. I never saw those shares again. Having still some trustfulness as a mark for the arrows of outrageous fortune, I felt somewhat pained; but I took it for granted the company-Warner had taken in some others-would readily reissue the stolen shares. There aren’t many things a body should take for granted except the law of gravitation and human selfishness. I shouldn’t have taken that thing for granted. Warner was willing, but the others weren’t, and I saw clearly enough that I’d have to face a heap of wrangling to get my rights. There isn't a mine worth the wear and tear of wrangling. I made up my mind that I’d leave those four shares stand over for adjudication when Gabriel calls us all into court, and I figured out that I’d go it alone. Profoundly disgusted by my dealings with men, I determined to turn to nature. As I said in the beginning, I didn’t hate; I distrusted. Hate is a fierce fire that consumes, the heart which yields it, and I hadn’t any grudge against myself.

Off into a wilderness, eighty miles up among the mountains, I traveled--three days of hard riding from the nearest settlement. When I could look the earth in the face and not see man’s image there, I halted. On the bank of a pleasant creek I made my home. A mighty rock jutted from the mountain-side hard by the stream, and in a hollow of its hospitable face I rested for twenty golden years.

Ultimately I enclosed this hollow, building three walls of stones cemented by adobe. The roof, so far as it projected from the great rock, was of adobe tiles. When I had the walls about four feet high I sprained by back lifting a too-heavy stone. That put an end to building operations for many months. After a time some Mexicans who were wandering through the mountains helped me to complete the walls and roof the enclosure. This enclosure I dived into three rooms, in one of which I built a huge fireplace. I never made an oven and I never had a stove in all those years. My cooking was done in this fireplace. For a few years I had several cooking utensils, but one day those were stolen. I venture to say there is no fastness wild enough to give pause to the thievish instincts of men. If there is, sure it is that I have never found it. It may be that our notions of property are at variance with natural law. By degrees I replaced the utensil, bringing home something necessary when I returned from the settlement, whither I journeyed once or twice a year. Not precisely that, either; bringing something I could use is better. After all, the things which are necessary are so few a body could write them on a square inch of paper. The excesses imposed by what we call civilization are so many that they burden the earth.

I had a rifle, a shotgun, plenty of ammunition, some blankets and a bit of steel. In the mountains I found a piece of flint. I had no matches, nor wanted any. With my steel and flint I kindled all the fire I required during my solitary life for those decades. I had no candles, no kerosene, nor wanted any. Pitch-pine torches served me well enough.

When the sun was yet below the crest of the mountains and the dawn was grey I took a gun and went into the forest, bringing home game enough to make my table glad. No king had better, I reckon, and there was no sauce of bitterness. Along the streams and in the glades I found vegetables to my looking and those things I couldn’t find I raised to the extent I cared for them, getting seeds originally at the settlement. When I felt lonely I turned to the stars or the flowers or the waters and was comforted. There’s a heap of company to a star if you know how to get on speaking terms with it, and the brooks tell stories, and the flowers are full of history, and the birds are honest friends.

The first ten years I kept tally on the big game I killed. I had 2,600 deer and sixty-five black bear on the list when I threw up the job of keeping account of my hunting. The bear skins and deer hams were salable, and I exchanged then at the settlement for such articles as I needed or fancied I’d like to have. The woods were full of deer, bears and wild turkeys, and I could tell a story or two worth hearing of some of my experience as hunter and trapper.

I’m not giving to bragging, for I don’t care a row of pins what is thought of me or whether I’m thought of at all or no. I say this as a lead to the claim that no man on earth knows more about cooking game then I know. I have experimented and studied. The combinations and methods I have tried are so many that volumes would be required to list them. And as a result of it all I say that not one cook in one thousand understands the art of getting out of meat the best that is in it. Why, the juices of meat are more precious than pearls, and who among you know how to save the glory of them for the palate and their best value for the blood.

The last seven years of my stay in the wilderness I was more or less infirm. A stroke of paralysis found me one day, while I was clambering over the rocks, and I wasn’t good for much after that. For six months I lay besides my fireplace, keeping as close to the blaze as I could without burning. A young Mexican cared for me. He put in a heap of time rubbing my paralyzed left side with bear oil. Then I began to feel better, and could move about a little. No doctor could have done so much for me as that heat and bear oil did. Well, let me add a word for my will. Will is a tremendous power. I bear testimony out of an experience few men have equaled in my generation. I made up my mind to beat that paralysis, and I pinned my faith to the heat and oil. The will had a great deal to do with pulling me through.

After that I found it hard to hunt, for it was not easy as it had been to climb here and there among the mountains in search of game. Often I fell and hurt myself. Old age was coming on, too, and there came times when even my strong will failed to gain response from the shattered army of muscles it commanded.

Three times within those seven years the Mexican--there had come to be a few of hem among the mountains since I settled there--concluded I was so near the end that they had better be prepared; and three times, accordingly, they brought a carpenter to the place and had a box made for me. I was so weak that I couldn’t speak or move, but I could hear the saw and hammer, and I made a strong drive with my will to beat the Mexicans out of a funeral. I lived to use those boxes for kindling wood.

Still, I realized I was on the down grade and might lose control of the brake almost any moment, and I began to think of going back to California. I had a daughter there and there was a warmth in my heart for her, and somehow I didn’t like to die out there in the wilds with my girl so far away. I thought I’d like to have her hand in mine when I crossed the great divide. Besides, I had an ambition to fool that carpenter.

But I couldn’t face California a pauper. I didn’t want to be a penniless in a land where I had been prosperous. Pride, I suppose. Well, pride, I take it, is about the strongest passion we have. I never felt like getting along with less of it that I found on hand. It pulls something in your heart at times, but it gives firmness to your step and strength to your eye.

So I concluded I’d try to acquire title to some of the valuable lands about me, for I didn’t own even the site of my home. The woods abounded in acorns and I set to work raising hogs, my plan being to sell pork to the miners. I made a little money this way and was about to make more when along came another wave of misfortune. I had a drove of six hundred porkers, a dry spell struck the region. Every hog died. The I took the little money I had accumulated and determined to buy with it as much land as it would exchange for. I trusted the commission to a Mexican official, being feeble too attend it myself. Of course he embezzled the money. I never saw him again.

Realizing that I could not reach independence soon enough by the first route planned, I made up my mind to apply to the United States for the pension to which I was entitled for my service in the army of Fremont. That way, I knew, I could secure enough income for my simple wants and could return to California without forfeiture of self-respect. I applied, but soon ran into a snag. I had to have two witnesses to prove myself the Matt Harbin who was of the Pathfinder’s forces. No one in Mexico could supply the proof. I had therefore to turn to California.

I wrote my daughter, who was in Fresno county, and she supplied me a railway ticket. When it arrived I took a long look at the old place. I knew I should never see it again, and it was dear to me. Then I mounted a horse and rode away, not looking back. I was afraid to look back. I reckoned the great rock might draw me to it if I gave it half a chance.

A Mexican rode with me to Durnago, a six-days journey. I was too weak to go alone.

When the train pulled into Toreon I got off to get something to eat and there I lost my ticket. After leaving Toreon the conductor made his rounds, and as I could not produce the ticket he put me off the train. That night I slept in my blanket beside the track. Next day I journeyed back to Toreon, and after a delay of twelve days the American Consul procured for me a second ticket. He helped me pay for a room in which to sleep while I was waiting. I reached Fresno without further mishap, and taking the stage to Pine Ridge was soon with my child and her family and could find nothing in my appearance with which she was familiar except this withered finger some meddling Mexican plunked at the battle of Chino.

Here I am content to spend the few remaining years. I have sounded the deeps and shallows of fortune, and I look out upon the world with something of sadness and nothing of fear or anger. It has not used me well, but then it’s such a crude world yet, and I reckon it doesn’t know any better. J.M. Harbin, Pine Ridge, June 20. (1897)

Contributed by Judy Klee


HARRIS, James A.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 241-242

Is a native of Butler County, Pennsylvania, and was born October 30, 1839. When he was thirteen years of age his parents moved to Iowa. Here farming was prosecuted about five years, when he engaged in teaching school for about three years. We next find Mr. Harris in the gold mines of Colorado, where he remained about eighteen months, when he returned to Iowa and engaged in dairying. In July, 1862, he enlisted and served as a private for three years in the Northern ranks. At the end of this time he returned to Iowa and resumed his dairying business about one year; then, on account of failing health, he came to California. He came via Panama and arrived at San Francisco November 4, 1866. As health was the chief object, he sought the desirable climate of Lake County, and settled about three miles south from Lower Lake, where he now resides, being engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Harris married April 22, 1862, Miss Louisa C. Parker. She died January 2, 1873 leaving three children: Eugene, Erwin and Katie. He married secondly, April 14, 1875, Miss Lina Powell, by whom he has three children: Ralph A., Carl N., and Martha. She died September 5, 1881, leaving three children as above named.



HARRIS, Thomas M.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 240

Was born in Pennsylvania December 19, 1828. Here he resided on a farm until 1853, when he crossed the plains to California. Like all early comers, Mr. Harris engaged in mining, which he followed until December, 1859, at which time he located one hundred and sixty acres in Yolo County. From this land the first lots were sold for building purposes in the town of Woodland. In June, 1862, having disposed of all his interests in Yolo County, he came to Lake County, where he has since resided. Since his advent into Lake County, Mr. Harris has been engaged in several different pursuits, among which might be mentioned stock raising, farming and hotel-keeping, and at one time, while keeping hotel at Lower Lake, lost his all by fire. He is at present engaged in wool growing, about six miles south from Lower Lake. Mr. Harris was married, May 24, 1849, to Miss Prudence Simpson, a native of Pennsylvania. Their children are, Laura, Alpheus, Ella and Thomas M., Jr. They have lost Alonzo, Prudence and Bruce.



HASKIN, A. S.

From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California, The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

A.S. HASKIN, a farmer of Lake County, was born November 11, 1821, in Trimble County, Kentucky. His father was a native of Virginia. A.S. Haskin remained in his native State till 1866. In that year he went to Marion County, Missouri, and in 1868 he went to Saline County of the same State, where he was for twelve years engaged in farming. In 1880 he came to California and settled in Fresno County, where he remained three years. He then went to San Luis Obispo County, where he remained until 1888, when he came to Lake County. He owns 108 acres of excellent land, all under cultivation. It lies about six miles south of Lakeport on the Highland Springs road, and is beautifully located. He raises grain and stock. He was married February 17, 1843, to Miss Lucy Mothersead, a native of Virginia. Her parents moved to Kentucky when she was three years old. They have nine children: Armsted G., America M., Sarah Ann, Narcissa J., Mary E., Octavia, Orretta T., Annie Lee, Thomas E. Octavia and Annie are at home with their parents. The other children have made homes of their own. Mr. Haskin was a magistrate for the county in which he lived in Kentucky, for twelve years. Although he has always been actively engaged in farming and other laborious pursuits, time has dealt gently with him, and his present appearance is that of an energetic, middle-aged man, in the prime of life. In politics, Mr. Haskin affiliates with the Democratic party.

Transcribed by: Betty Wilson


HAYCOCK, Thomas


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 239-240

Was born in New Brunswick August 31, 1824. When but a child his parents moved to Maine. When the subject of this sketch was about thirteen years of age they moved to Canada. In 1854 Thomas went to Minnesota, where he spent about four years and then came to California via Panama, arriving at San Francisco November 30, 1858. The first six months after arriving were spent in the mines of Nevada County. He then went to Plumas County, where he followed the same business until 1863, when he bought a hotel and ranch at Meadow Valley, which he conducted until 1867. He then again engaged in mining, which he prosecuted until 1874, when he returned East, where he remained a few months, returning to Plumas County in the fall of the above year. The next three years were spent in Plumas and Butte Counties, and in March, 1877, he came to Lake County and settled in Scotts Valley, where he now lives. Mr. Haycock married, November 22, 1852, Miss Sarah E. Turner, who died July 28, 1855, leaving one child, Sarah E. He married secondly, November 10, 1874, Mrs. Isabelle Sweazy, a native of Canada.



HENDRICKS, Greenbury

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 240

Was born in Tennessee, December 9, 1827. When but a young boy his mother died, and he with his father went to Missouri, where he followed brick-making until September, 1853, when he went to Texas, where he followed farming until April, 1859, when, with his family, consisting of wife and two children, he crossed the plains to California. After a long and tedious trip they arrived in Tulare County, in September, 1859, where they resided until December, 1861, at which time they came to Lake County and settled on a farm in Scotts Valley. Here he engaged in farming until his death, which occurred April 22, 1876. Mr. Hendricks was married, June 26, 1853, in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, to Miss Mary A. Stephenson, by whom he had seven children: Lafayette, Amanda E., Lydia, William G., Joseph W., John B. and Robert E.



HENDRICKS, J. D.

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 241

Was born in Henry County, Tennessee, April 24, 1833. In October, 1855, he went to Missouri, where the winter was spent, and in the spring of 1856 started across the plains for California. In September of the above year, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, was reached. Here he spent two years at different occupations, and then went to Oregon, where farming was prosecuted for eight years. In December, 1866, he returned to California, and settled on his present place, consisting of six hundred and forty-seven acres, located about one mile south of Lower Lake, in Lake County. Here he is engaged in farming and wool growing. Mr. Hendricks married, October 21, 1857, Miss Mary F. Dillard, a native of Missouri. Their children are, Charles E., born July 26, 1858; Frank, born October 4, 1860; Addie, born January 9, 1863; Vina, born November 24, 1864; John, born May 1, 1870; Flora, born March 3, 1875; and Grace, born April 9, 1880.



HERNDON, N.

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

This old and respected pioneer of Lake County was born in Sumner County, Tennessee, September 15, 1809. He resided on a farm until nineteen years of age, when he engaged as apprentice to the cabinet trade. In the fall of 1833 he went to Texas, and in the spring of 1834 went to Missouri, where farming was followed until 1856. In that year he crossed the plains to California, and arrived in Lake County in October. He settled near where Lower Lake now stands and engaged in farming and stock raising. In 1877 he moved upon his present place, consisting of about nine hundred acres, located about five miles east of Lower Lake, where he engaged in wool growing. He also owns his original place near Lower Lake consisting of three hundred acres. Mr. Herndon married July 4, 1831, Miss Caroline Sweeney, who died September 20, 1840, leaving five children: Lafayette, Frank, Mary, William and Patsey A.

Page 67: The list of old settlers furnished us by Mr. W. C. Goldsmith has reference more to the vicinity of Lower Lake, but we will insert it here. ...In 1856 there came in and settled...N. Herndon and family, consisting of wife and six sons and six daughters....

Page 140: EARLY SETTLEMENT: The first settlers of this township located at or near the present town site of Lower Lake...N. Herndon

Page 144: FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS: Clear Lake Lodge, No. 183, F. & A.M., was organized U. D. February 4, 1867 with the following charter members: ...F. M. Herndon. ...and F. M. Herndon, Steward(s)... The present membership is thiety-eight, and the lodge is in a very prosperous condition indeed. They meet in the Odd-Fellow's Hall.

Contributed by Margaret Hinton


HUDSON, David


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

David was born in Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri 15 October 1820 where he resided with his parents until he was about seventeen years of age. He then moved with his parents to Polk County, which later became Dade County, Missouri, where his parents died in 1840. David remained there engaged in farming and stock raising until 1844, when he returned to Lexington and remained there until May, 1845. David with William, and his sister Lucinda and her husband, John YORK, in May 1845 started across the plains for California, and arrived at Johnsons Ranch October 15th of that year. They arrived in Napa Valley about the first of November, and spent the first winter where Calistoga now stands. In the spring of 1846 he engaged in the Bear Flag War, and then joined the Mexican volunteer service, where he served until 1847. In the spring of that year he returned to Napa Valley and purchased land near St. Helena. He went to the mines in El Dorado County, upon the discovery of gold, where he operated with good success, often digging out $125. worth a day. In the fall of 1848, on account of failing health he returned to Napa Valley and settled on land which he had previously purchased, and engaged in farming and stock raising until 1873. He found that his health was failing, his trouble being asthma, hence he moved to Lake County, California and settled on his present place, consisting of one thousand two hundred acres, located in Coyote Valley, where he has since resided being engaged in farmingand stock raising. Mr. Hudson was married, December 9, 1847, to Miss Frances Griffith, a native of North Carolina.

They have six living children: Rodney J., Livonia, Elbert, Luella, Ada and Robert L.; and have lost one, Bertha.

David died in Lake County, California. June 10, 1888. On June 12, 1888 he was buried in St. Helena, Napa County, California.

David HUDSON was the son of William Pink HUDSON and Julia Ann KETTENRING. He married on 8 Dec 1847 in Santa Rosa, Sonoma, California, Frances GRIFFITH, born 12 Sep 1832 in South Carolina; died 4 May 1923 in Lakeport, Lake, California; buried 6 May 1923 in St. Helena, Napa, California.


Contributed by Margaret Hinton


HUDSON, Judge Rodney J.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Whose portrait it affords us pleasure to present in the body of this work, was born at St. Helena, Napa County, February 20, 1850, and is the son of David and Frances Hudson. Judge Hudson springs from a fine family, his father being a scion of the well-known and highly esteemed Catron family of Tennessee, one of whom, for a period of thirty years, was a highly distinguished Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. His mother was a native of North Carolina, and is allied by blood to one of its best families. Young Hudson grew up at his birthplace, and made the best of the imperfect advantages for obtaining a primary education, which the then inefficient conditions of the schools offered. At the age of fifteen he entered an academy at Sonoma, which was conducted under the auspices of the Presbyterians, where Latin and the higher mathematics were taken up. At the end of the term he wrote and delivered his maiden oration, which was highly complimented by the Professors of the Academy, and served to show clearly the bent of the boy's mind, the latent powers that lay within him awaiting proper development. He then returned to his father's farm, but books had a much greater attraction for him than the humdrum, prosaical avocation of tramping up and down a furrow behind a plow, and a book was generally carried to the field, which received much more attention than the work in hand. He then spent three years in attendance at the St. Helena public schools, which were then of high grade, and here he learned to read Latin fluently and made considerable progress in higher mathematics. During his attendance at this school, and while yet only eighteen years of age, he made his debut into the political arena. In 1868, during the campaign of Seymour and Blair on the one side and Grant and Wilson on the other, a political meeting was held in St. Helena. The late Hon. W. W. Pendegast was the speaker of the evening, and among those present were young Hudson and his father and mother. At the close of Mr. Pendegast's speech the audience began to call loudly for Rodney Hudson, whose abilities as an orator were even then well-known among his friends and acquaintances, and by them fully recognized. When the calls for the young man became so persistent that it became evident that the crowd would not hear a refusal, his father departed, either thinking that his presence would embarrass the boy, or not desiring to be present to witness what he considered inevitable failure. His mother, too, felt that a crisis in the boy's life was just at hand, and with her womanly sensitiveness shrank instinctively from witnessing it. But the father's flight and the mother's fears were unnecessary, for the youthful orator was equal to the occasion, and for the space of half an hour he held the audience with his fluent and graceful oratory, and surprised even his best friends by his knowledge of the political issues of the day. Owing to his youth, the effort was regarded with a great deal of favor by all who heard it, and created quite a sensation, and from that time on he has always sustained a high reputation as a public speaker. His next move was to take charge of the St. Helena public schools, having a scholarship of about two hundred, and two assistant teachers. In 1869 he entered the University of Michigan. In a short time his health failed, and he was forced to quit school and return to California. He then entered the law office of Thomas P. Stoney, then County Judge of Napa County, as a student, where he remained for one year. On the occasion of the Fourth of July celebration at St. Helena in 1872, young Hudson, then only twenty-two years of age, was called upon to deliver the oration for the occasion. An extract from the Napa Register, then edited by G. W. Henning, will give an idea of the merits of the effort produced by Mr. Hudson on that occasion: "The oration was by Rodney J. Hudson, whom St. Helena may be flattered to call her 'boy.' Rodney - he will excuse the familiarity - looks the orator. He has a talent which, if cultivated, will place him in the very front rank of public speakers. His personelle and the fact that he was their own, created an interest in him which was not diminished in the least by his finely turned and patriotic periods. * * * We hope he will not go into politics. There is a crown awaiting him in his legitimate professional career which will set more lightly and gracefully upon his head than ever politician's will." In the fall of 1872 he entered the Law School at Lebanon, Tennessee, then presided over by the venerable Judge Carothers. While there he delivered an oration on Washington, which was complimented very highly by the Nashville Union, an extract from which we include in this connection: "His audience was thrilled with delight, excited alike by the spirit and eloquence of his words. The Golden State may well be proud of her representative in the Law School of the University." He graduated at this school and returned to California in 1873. In 1874 he formed a law partnership with the leading practioner in the southern part of the State. After having been there for four or five months he was called upon to make a Fourth of July address, of which the Los Angeles Star says: "The oration was the most superb effort of the kind ever made in Los Angeles. It was beautiful in all its points, and may be considered an oratorical gem of the first water. We have heard the oration spoken of everywhere as excellent, but not more so than its delivery, which was very fine." In 1875 he was nominated and elected by the Democratic party to the position of District Attorney of Los Angeles County. His first case was for murder, and the man was defended by Col. J. G. Howard, confessedly the ablest criminal lawyer in Southern California. The accused was convicted, and when the District Judge came down from the bench he said: "Mr. Hudson, you have conducted this case as well as any lawyer." He retained the office for two years, when, on account of failing health, he came to Lake County and opened a law office. Here he began at once to build up and maintain a good practice, rarely losing a case before a jury. Mr. Hudson sprang boldly and nobly into the great fight made for the new Constitution, urging its adoption by the people with the greatest vigor and eloquence. He took the field and made several brilliant and telling speeches, and was called the captain of the new Constitution forces in Lake County. In 1878 he was put in nomination for the position of Superior Judge of Lake County. It was a matter of serious doubt with his best friends whether or not he could win in the contest, his youth and limited acquaintance militating much against his chances of success. As for himself, he saw that only energy and determination could make success possible, and he made a thorough and personal canvass of the county, and then just upon the eve of the election addressed the people of the county in almost every voting precinct, which was evidently the great element of his success, as he was able to bring out the merits of his own case with a master hand. He was elected by a large plurality, showing that good work had been accomplished. Once elected, the problem of convincing the people of his judicial fairness and integrity confronted him. Upon taking the bench he announced to the bar that he would endeavor to be impartial and upright, and that he knew that he would be independent, as he did not owe his election to any corporation or powerful influence, but to the people. That he has kept his promise is attested by all the bar of Lake County. He has the reputation of observing a uniform courtesy to the bar while presiding, of being positive in his rulings, and swift to retreat when shown to be in error. Of Judge Hudson the Bulletin of Lake County says: "His rulings exhibit fine legal acumen, and he is one of the best judges in California, and after a while Lake County will be proud to help place him in Congress, where his singular abilities as an orator may have a fitting field in which to display their powers." Rodney J. Hudson is the youngest, but one, of the Superior Judges in this State; and who can read this sketch and see how he has climbed up the ladder, round by round, until he reached that high position when only twenty-nine years of age, without feeling proud of our grand American principles of liberty which give to worth, merit, and real labor, their just meed of reward. He was united in marriage in April, 1881, to Miss Panthea Boggs, daughter of A. G. Boggs, of Napa City.



HUSTON, J. H.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 239

Was born in Callaway County, Missouri, May 3, 1841. In April, 1864, he started across the plains for California with mule teams and arrived in Lake County in November. Here he engaged in farming and speculating until 1873, when he went to Colusa County, where the same business was prosecuted for two years. He then returned to Lake County, where he has since resided. He at present resides about four miles south from Lakeport. Mr. Huston married, October 11, 1871, Miss Cora L. Boggs, a native of Missouri.



"I"

INGRAM, J. C. W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Is a native of Gallatin, Illinois and was born April 4, 1829. Here he received his education, and resided on a farm until 1844, when he went to Missouri, where he spent about two years. The next two years were spent in Iowa and Wisconsin; after which he rturned to Missouri, and in the spring of 1849 he turned his face towards Oregon, where he arrived, after a six months journey with ox-teams, the last of October. Her he followed lumbering until the spring of 1851, when he came to California and followed mining at different places until September 1857, when he came to Lake County and located in big Valley, where he followed farming and stock raising until 1867, when he settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred acres, located in Scotts Valley, where he is engaged in farming and stock raising.
Mr. Ingram, during the years 1858-59 held the office of constable and in the fall of 1873 was elected Sheriff of Lake County which office he held four years. He married August 28, 1858, Miss Mandana A. Musick, a native of Missouri. They have six children: Luella C., John L., Mary R., Sarah A., Ruth and Mand. Have lost two: William R. and Preston.



"J"

JAMISON, James H.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 251

Was born in Missouri September 26, 1830. Here he received his education and resided until 1854, when he, with his family, consisting of wife and one child, crossed the plains with ox-teams, and arrived at Bidwells Bar, in Butte County, August 20th of that year. Mr. Jamison engaged at once in mining, which he followed about four years. He then engaged in keeping a public-house on Feather River, which he followed about six months. We next find him in Vallejo, Solano County, where he resided until June, 1859, when he came to Lake County and settled on a stock ranch, located on the road leading from Lower Lake to Kelseyville. Here he followed stock raising and keeping public-house for about fourteen years, since which time he has lived in Kelseyville. Mr. Jamison has held the office of Supervisor for three terms, first in 1861, second in 1863, and third and last in 1875. Mr. Jamison married, March 9, 1852, Miss Mary Annett, a native of Virginia. By this union they have four living children: Sarah A., James B., Rosa S., and Lizzie.



JONES, C. W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 251

Was born in Carroll County, Arkansas, April 26, 1840. In 1857 he, with his parents, crossed the plains with ox-teams and arrived in Stanislaus County in October of the last mentioned year. Here they spent one year farming, and then moved to Sutter County, and after spending one winter they moved to Plumas County. After a residence here of about seven years the subject of this sketch came to Lake County and settled in Scotts Valley, where he has since resided, being engaged in farming. He settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, in October, 1868. Mr. Jones married, October 24, 1867, Miss Narcissus A. McCabe, a native of Texas. They have four living children: Mary C., Charles W., James H. and Herbert M.; and have lost three: Thomas C., Walter M., and Annie B.



JONES, J. W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 251-252

Was born in Missouri February 27, 1836. When but a child his parents moved to Arkansas. In 1856 the subject of this sketch crossed the plains to California. He spent the first seven years of his California life in Plumas County, following different occupations. We next find him in Marysville, Yuba County, where he remained but a short time. He next went to San Joaquin Valley, where he spent one year, and then returned to Marysville and spent two years, and again returned to Plumas County, where he spent about six months, and then came to Lake County in the fall of 1867. Here he remained a short time and returned to Plumas County, and in 1868 again returned to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of three hundred and twenty acres, located about three miles from Upper Lake, on the Bartlett Springs road. Mr. Jones married, in 1867, Miss Mary E. McCabe, by whom he has seven living children: William, Edward, Franklin, Lucinda, Catherine, Phillip and Zeno; and have lost one: Aaron.



"K"

KEAN, Joseph B.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 254

Was born in New Jersey, November 17, 1817. When but a small boy he sailed on board the ship "North Star," of which his uncle was captain, as cabin-boy. After four years he returned home, where he spent one season. He then shipped before the mast as an able seaman for about four years, aboard of different ships. He then took charge of a brig on the northern lakes for about five years. He then went to New Orleans, where he had charge of the schooner "Belle Union" for one year, after which he commanded the "N. B. George" for about seven months. Mr. Kean then returned home, where he remained until the spring of 1847, when he went to South America, and engaged in mining until 1849, when he came to California, arriving at San Francisco May 12th of the same year. He went at once to the mines on the Yuba River, where he followed mining about two years, when he was taken sick with mountain fever. He then went to the Sandwich Islands, where he remained about four months; then went back to his birthplace, and after making a short visit settled in De Kalb County, Illinois, where he remained until 1854. He then crossed the plains to California, bringing a drove of about seventy-five cattle. He arrived in Siskiyou County in October of the above year, where he settled, and engaged in dairying for three years, when he sold out, and moved to Petaluma, Sonoma County, where he embarked in the forwarding and commission business until April, 1867, when he came to Lake County, and settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred acres, located about three miles south from Upper Lake, where he is engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Kean married, in 1837, Miss Bessie M. McKane, a native of Pennsylvania. By this union they have three living children: Sylvester, Laura A. and Sarah J.; and have lost one: Levy M.



KEATLEY, Thomas


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 253-254

Was born in St. Louis County, Missouri, April 19, 1826. When eighteen years of age he went to Houston, Texas, where he followed surveying for about one and a half years. In 1846 he volunteered and served in the war with Mexico eight months, after which he returned to Houston and worked in a cabinet shop and saw-mill for two years. He then went to St. Louis, where he remained until the spring of 1850, when he crossed the plains to California. After spending about one year in Sacramento he went to the southern mines, and after about six months went to Trinity County. Here he followed mining until the fall of 1852, when he made a trip through Lake County to San Francisco, where he remained, being engaged in different business, until 1859, when he returned to St. Louis. Here he remained until 1861, when he again came to San Francisco, where he engaged in contracting and building until 1873, at which time he went to Cloverdale, Sonoma County, where he spent one year. He then came to Lake County and settled at Upper Lake, where he owns and conducts the Upper Lake planing and grist mill. Mr. Keatley married, June 14, 1860, Miss Amelia Gibson, a native of Missouri. They have three children: William T., Fannie P. and Ella F.



KEBERT, J. J.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 255

Was born in Pennsylvania, February 7, 1839. In February, 1856, he came via Panama to California. The first year was spent in the mines of Nevada County, and the next four were spent at the same occupation in Placer County. He next went to Virginia City, where a few months were spent, and then returned to California and spent about six months in the mines at Esmeralda, after which we find him in Yolo County, farming, which he continued until 1864. In 1865 he went to Mexico, and after mining for eight months returned to Yolo and followed dairying and butchering until May, 1878, when he came to Lake County and bought the Pearson Springs property, located about two miles east from Blue Lakes. Mr. Kebert married, January 25, 1881, Miss Antha Holstead, a native of Ontario.



KEITHLY, Seth T.


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

Was born at St. Helena, Napa County, February 20, 1850, and is the son of David and Frances Hudson. His father was a Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States for thirty years. Rodney Hudson grew up in St. Helena, and at age 15 entered an academy at Sonoma. In 1869 he entered the University of Michigan. In a short time his health failed, and he was forced to quit school and return to California. In the fall of 1872 he entered the Law School at Lebanon, Tennessee. He graduated in 1873 and returned to California. He set up his law practice in southern California, and in 1875 was elected as District Attorney of Los Angeles County. He remained in that office for two years, when, on account of failing health, he came to Lake County and opened a law office. In 1878 he was elected as Superior Judge of Lake County at the age of 29. (He was still the Superior Court Judge at the time of this book (1881)) He was united in marriage in April, 1881, to Miss Panthea Boggs, daughter of A. G. Boggs, of Napa City.

SETH T. KEITHLY, a Lake County farmer, is a native of Harrison County, Indiana, born April 29, 1836. When he was quite young, his parents moved to McDonough County, Illinois, where his father engaged in farming. In 1860 S.T. came to California and settled in Yolo County, where he remained till 1865. He then went to Sonoma County, where he bought a small farm, on which he lived for ten years. In the fall of 1875 he sold his farm and came to Lake County, and bought the farm on which he now resides. He has 1444 acres of land in Big Valley, lying between the Kelseyville road and Clear Lake, which he devotes to the raising of wheat. He was married February 23, 1865, to Miss Sarah Ann Peugh,. They have six children: Jacob A., David E,., Georgia, Adda, Lem and Lillian A.

Transcribed by: Betty Wilson


KELSEY, John


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 257

Was born in Kentucky, July 17, 1819. At the age of eighteen he went to Tennessee, where he engaged as apprentice to the gunsmith trade for four years. We next find him in Ray County, Missouri, where gunsmithing was followed until 1867, when he was elected to the position of County Treasurer, which office he held for six years. In 1873 he came to California, and to Lake County, settling in Kelseyville, where he still continues to reside. Mr. Kelsey married, in 1839, Miss Emma Jones, a native of Tennessee. Their children are, William, Alvin, Solomon and Linnia A.



KENNEDY, Hiram


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 253

Was born in Goffstown, New Hampshire, November 20, 1835. His early days were spent in a saw-mill with his father, and in 1849 the father came to California, and Hiram engaged as apprentice to the mechanic's trade. This he followed until 1854, when he came via Panama to California, and joined his father at Dicksburg, a mining camp in Yuba County. Here he followed mining until 1859, when, with his father, he came to Lake County and settled in Long Valley, where he now resides. Mr. Kennedy married, August 20, 1872, Miss Rosa Wilson, a native of Pennsylvania, by whom he has three children: Alexis, Milo and Albert.



KENNEDY, James


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 253

Was born in Goffstown, New Hamsphire, July 12, 1796. Here he resided on a farm with his parents until 1823, when he, in company with three other men, built a pail factory at New Boston. Just as this institution was proving a success it took fire and burned to the ground. Mr. Kennedy then turned his attention to milling, and was foreman in different grist-mills for about twenty-seven years. Then, on account of failing health, caused from the dust, he changed his labors to saw-mills, which he followed until 1849, when he sailed from Boston in the bark "Chester," and rounded Cape Horn, arriving at San Francisco, after a rough passage of one hundred and ninety days, in April, 1850. Mr. Kennedy engaged at once in mining, which he followed at different places until June, 1859, when he came to Lake County and settled in Long Valley, where he has since resided. He married, in June, 1823, Miss Phoebe Robie, who died in the spring of 1856 in New Hampshire, leaving six children: Clarinda, Diantha, Roberta, Hiram, Almus and Esther.



KENNEDY, Romulus


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 256-257

Was born in Seneca County, New York, December 22, 1818. In 1829 his parents moved to Michigan and located in Detroit, where his father followed the business of contractor and builder until 1836, when he moved to Canada and engaged in the distilling and brewing business. Young Kennedy remained in Detroit, attending school, and living with Stephen T. Mason, the Governor of the Territory. About 1837 he began the business of carpentering, and worked in Buffalo and Detroit till 1840, when he went to New Orleans, where he followed trading on the Mississippi River for about one year. He then engaged in clerking in a store in New Orleans until November, 1848, when he went to Memphis and opened a boat store. In February, 1850, he started for California, crossing the plains in a company of which Dr. Benjamin Bryand, now of Santa Clara, was captain. They arrived at Sacramento in August of that year, and spent about four months in the mines, when he went to Sacramento and began carpentering. At the end of four months he went to Vacaville, Solano County, and built the first house ever erected in the place, for Mason Wilson. He remained there until 1852, when he returned to Sacramento and worked at his trade till April, 1855, when he met with an accident which made him a cripple for life. He was disabled by this accident so that he was confined to his bed most of the time till 1858. He then went to Vacaville and took charge of the Wilson House, where he remained till 1864. He then came to Lake County and located at Lakeport, where he still resides, and is engaged in his trade. Since his residence here he has held the office of Justice of the Peace, by election and appointment for about eight years. He was married, September 6, 1880, to Miss Bell Hurlbut, a native of New York.



KENYON, Samuel W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 255

Was born in Schuyler County, New York, May 12, 1856. In 1870 he, with his parents, emigrated to Kansas, and after a residence of about one year returned to Schuyler County, where they resided until 1875. At this date the subject of this sketch left his parents and came to California. The first six months were spent at the Great Eastern Quicksilver Mine in Lake County, after which he engaged in farming, which he followed for about three years. We next find him engaged in the livery business in Lakeport for about six months, when he changed his residence to Middletown, where he is now engaged in keeping a livery stable. Mr. Kenyon married, June 20, 1878, Miss Ella Hudson, a native of California, and daughter of David Hudson of Middletown.



KERR, William


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 253

Was born in Tennessee, September 12, 1832. In 1849 he went to Missouri, where he followed farming until the spring of 1853, when he crossed the plains to California with ox-teams, and arrived at Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, on the 22d of October of the above year. Here he was engaged in farming, sheep raising, clerking, and working in a wagon shop until 1874, when he came to Lake County and settled at Upper Lake, where he has since resided. Mr. Kerr married, February 16, 1862, Miss Catharine Bradshaw, a native of Missouri. Their children are, Ida, Isaac and Bell. They have lost five: Eva, Lulu, Willie, Cora and Nellie.



KESEY, William


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 252

Was born in Franklin County, Pennyslvania, February 22, 1819. When he was seventeen years of age he became apprenticed to the cabinet-maker's trade. When he was twenty years of age he went to Lancaster County, that State, where he worked at his trade one year. He then returned to Franklin County, where he worked at his trade until the spring of 1845, when he went to Wyandotte, Ohio, and there worked at his trade for one year. He then returned to his native county and volunteered for the Mexican War. He was taken sick at once, and after six months he returned to Franklin County, where he remained until 1847. He then went to Ohio with his father, where he clerked in a store until February, 1849, when he started for California, crossing the plains with mule teams. He arrived at Sutter's Fort September 19th of that year. Here he engaged in packing and trading, which he followed until 1851. He then engaged in keeping a hay-yard at Sacramento City, and also owned and conducted a farm a short distance down the river. In 1852 he lost all his city property by fire, and all his farm products by flood. In 1853 he went to Los Angeles, and was engaged in the stock business until 1858. He then went to Yolo County, where he dealt in stock until 1862. He then went to Washoe, where he remained only a few months. He then went to Calaveras County and prospected until the spring of 1863, when he came to Lake County and located at Lower Lake. Here he engaged in carpentering until fall, when he went to Borax Lake and remained there for about four years, engaged in his trade. In the meantime he purchased a tract of land which he moved upon in 1867, and engaged in farming until the spring of 1871. He then sold out and moved to Lower Lake, where he has since resided, being engaged in wool growing since then to some extent. In 1872 he was appointed Postmaster and Notary Public, which positions he held till 1875. He was appointed Deputy Assessor in 1873, and has held that appointment ever since. He was married, May 26, 1864, to Miss Margaret Adams, a native of Missouri, and they have one child living, James, and have lost one.



KIPHART, Charles


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 255-256

Was born in Clark County, Indiana, June 9, 1828. When he was but a child his parents moved to Johnson County, and after a short residence here they moved to Morgan County. Here farming was prosecuted until 1853, when the subject of this sketch left his parents and crossed the plains to California, arriving in Yuba County in October of the above year. In the fall of 1854 he went to the mines, and followed a miner's life until March, 1855, when he engaged in farming in Suisun Valley, Solano County. Here he remained until December, 1857, when he came to Lake County and settled about one mile south from Lower Lake, where he still resides. Mr. Kiphart married, April 11, 1850, Miss Emmarine Henderson, a native of Indiana. By this marriage they have five children: Zerelda, Sarah E., Milton, Ebenezer and Cynthia.



KOUNS, A.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 254-255

Was born in Kentucky, December 6, 1843. In 1859 he, in company with his mother, one brother and two sisters - his father being dead - crossed the plains to California. They arrived at Smith Ferry in October of the above year, and resided there until July, 1861, when they came to Lake County. In November, 1871, the subject of this sketch settled on his present place, consisting of three hundred and twenty acres, located about ten miles south-east from Lower Lake, where he is engaged in wool growing. He married, July 5, 1868, Miss Rosette A. Copsey, who died October 21, 1873, leaving two children: Sarah L. and Jacob, who died March 16, 1874. He married, secondly, March 12, 1876, Miss Emma A. De Wolf, foster-child of C. L. Wilson, by whom he has two living children: Ira M. and Charles L.; they have lost one: Lucy M.



"L"

LAWRENCE, Richard H.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 257-258

Was born in Caroline County, Virginia, September 10, 1828. At the age of sixteen he entered the office of Richard Hill, Jr., at Richmond, as clerk. Here he remained three years. The next year was spent in teaching school in King George County. March 24, 1849, he sailed aboard the ship "Mananna" for California. Rounding Cape Horn, he arrived at San Francisco September 24th of the above year. He at once proceeded to the mines on Yuba River, where he followed mining two years; after which he went to Solano County, and settled in Suisun Valley, where he followed farming one year. We next find him in Sonoma, where he remained until May, 1854, when he came to Lake County, and settled in Bachelor Valley. Here he engaged in stock raising until 1861, when he was appointed under sheriff, and removed to Lakeport. This office he held two years. In 1865 he moved to Mendocino County, and had charge of the toll road leading from Lakeport to Cloverdale for about fifteen months. He then moved back to Lake County, and engaged in hotel-keeping at Lower Lake, which he continued until 1876. He then engaged in farming in Big Valley for about two years, after which he moved to Lakeport, where he has since resided. Mr. Lawrence has held the office of Justice of the Peace two terms, being elected first in 1856 and again in 1864. In 1878 he was again appointed under sheriff, which position he held two years, and in 1871 he held the office of notary public. He married, in August, 1861, Miss Eliza Worsely, a native of Delaware.



LEAGUE, James N.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 258

Was born in Hannibal, Missouri, June 29, 1845. At the age of sixteen he entered the Confederate service and served about eighteen months. He then went to St. Louis, where he attended Commercial College for one year. We next find him in Ralls County, Missouri, engaged in merchandising, which he followed about two years. In the spring of 1868 he came via Panama to California, and, after spending one year in Lake County camping, returned East and established a boot and shoe store in Glasgow, Missouri. This he conducted until June, 1870, when he again came to California and to Lake County. He located at Lakeport, where he engaged in merchandising until June, 1876, when he changed his residence and business to Upper Lake, where he has since resided. Mr. League married, November 20, 1872, Miss Jennie Marr, a native of Missouri. By this union they have two children: Ida and Thomas L.



LEVIN, David


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 258-259

Was born in Germany, November 18, 1853. When he was about eight years of age he, with his parents, came to New York, where they remained about eight months. The family then proceeded to California, coming by way of Panama. The subject of this sketch received his education at the South Cosmopolitan School in San Francisco. In 1868 he engaged in the hat trade which he followed until 1878, when he came to Lakeport, and engaged with Mr. Aaron Levy in the general merchandise business, where he has since resided. He was married, April 29, 1878, to Miss Minnie Levy, and their children are Golda and Ellis.



LEVY, Aaron


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 259-260

The subject of this sketch was born in Russian Poland, September 15, 1830. In 1851 he, with his brother Louis, came to New York, where he remained for two years. In 1853 he came to California, via Panama, arriving at San Francisco in the fall. There he engaged in the dry goods business, which he continued until 1857, when he went to Napa and remained until 1859. He then engaged in merchandising with H. Cohn, about one mile below the present site of Lakeport, to which place they moved their stock of goods at the end of a year. In about a year they admitted H. Charmark as a partner in the firm, and kept him in charge of the business. Mr. Levy then went to Virginia City, and engaged in the clothing business, where he remained until 1865. He then returned to Lakeport, and purchased the interest of Mr. Cohn, and the business was then conducted under the firm name of Chamark & Levy. At the end of two years he bought Mr. Charmark's interest in the Lakeport store, and the latter took the branch store at Kelseyville, which they had established in that place. From that time until 1878 he conducted the business alone, when Mr. David Levin was admitted as a partner, and the firm name is now Levy & Levin. Mr. Levy is among the pioneer merchants of Lake County, and has remained continuously in the business. He was married June 21, 1856, to Miss Bertha Levison, and by this union there are six living children: Minnie, Joseph, Solomon, Lena, Rebeckie and Celia.



LEVY, Morris


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 258

Was born in Russia August 15, 1852. When thirteen years of age he went to England, where three years were spent. In 1868 he came to California, and after spending three years in San Francisco, came to Lake County and engaged in general merchandising at Lower Lake, which business he still continues to follow. Mr. Levy married, July 6, 1879, Miss Selina Wolf, a native of England. By this marriage they have one child, Solomon.



LYNCH, John


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 257

Was born in Ireland in 1829. Here he resided with his parents on a farm until nineteen years of age, when he came to America and spent the first two years in New York City. The next fourteen months were spent in Auburn in a woolen factory. He then went to New York, and took passage aboard the ship "Racer," and came around Cape Horn, arriving at San Francisco about October 20, 1852. He went at once to the mines in Tuolumne County, where he remained until the fall of 1856, when he returned to San Francisco and engaged in the milk business until September, 1858. He then came to Lake County and settled in Scotts Valley, where farming and stock raising were conducted until the fall of 1864, when he settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred and forty acres, located in Big Valley, about two miles north-east from Kelseyville, where he is engaged in farming and dairying. Mr. Lynch married, October 6, 1857, Miss Rosa Kearns, a native of Ireland. They have one living child, David J., and have lost three: Catharine, James E. and John.



LYON, George A., Sr.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 259

Is a native of Canada, and was born August 8, 1821. When about ten years of age his parents moved to Pennsylvania, and after one year's residence there they moved to Ohio. At the age of nineteen the subject of this sketch entered the Alleghany College at Meadville, Pennsylvania, which institution he attended for two and one-half years, when, on account of failing health, he was compelled to discontinue. The next two years were spent in teaching school in Canada. He then returned to Pennsylvania and engaged in the manufacture of pig iron, which he followed for two years, when the building and machinery were destroyed by fire. Mr. Lyon was then appointed deputy sheriff of Mercer County, which office he held until March, 1849. He then started across the plains with ox-teams for California, and arrived at Sacramento September 1st of the above year. The first winter was spent in mining in Amador County. He then established a store at Jackson and after about six months, in company with two men, established a store in Sacramento, which they conducted, as well as that in Jackson, for about one year. The subject of this sketch then sold his interest to his partners, and engaged in hotel-keeping, in Placer County, which business he followed for six years. He then moved to Sacramento, where he resided until September, 1858, when he removed to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of nine hundred acres, located at Black Point, between Lakeport and Upper Lake, where he is now engaged in farming and wool growing. In 1859 he was elected Justice of the Peace, which office he held three years. My Lyon married, March 18, 1846, Miss Prudence McKean, a native of Pennsylvania. She died June 12, 1873, leaving eight children: George A., Sarah E., Carlos A., Clara M., James M., Edward E., Ada A., and Mabel C. He married secondly June 10, 1874, Mrs. Emma L. Ranard. By this union they have two children, Edith and Walter S.



"M"

MANLOVE, William H.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 261-262

Is a native of Virginia, and was born July 3, 1817. When about sixteen years of age he engaged as clerk in a general merchandise store at Petersburg. This occupation he followed until 1847, when he returned home and remained with his parents on a farm until 1849, when he sailed, aboard the ship "Marianna," for California. After making the trip around Cape Horn, he arrived at San Francisco in September of the above year. Mr. Manlove went at once to the mines in Amador County, where he prosecuted mining and merchandising for two years. He then went to the northern mines, where about six months were spent. We next find him engaged in farming in Sacramento County where he remained until 1855, when he came to Lake County and located in Coyote Valley, where he resided until 1861, when he was elected Sheriff of Lake County. This office he held two terms by election and a portion of another by appointment. At the close of his official term he settled in Big Valley, where he has since resided. He owns three hundred and fifty acres, located about four and one-half miles south from Lakeport, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. Manlove married, in November, 1862, Miss Susan Thompson, a native of Missouri. They have eight living children, Louisa F., James J., Virginia B., Minnie L., Katie, Hattie H., William D. and Navara.



MATHEWS, Mack


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 264

The subject of this sketch was born near Shelbyville, Indiana, April 4, 1840. He moved with his father's family to south-west Missouri, where he remained till he was sixteen years of age; and in 1856 he came to California. He has lived in Lake County since its organization, and has held the position of Superintendent of Schools for several terms, being elected at the last general election held in 1879, and is the present incumbent, filling the office with great credit to himself and to the full satisfaction of the people. He is a thoroughly energetic man and fully identified with the interests of the county in which he resides.



MATHEWS, William Randolph, M.D.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 265-267

Was of English, Scotch and German descent, his English and Scotch ancestors having settled in the Southern Colonies before the Revolution, and taken part with the rebels in the wild warfare of that period. His father was a Baptist minister, and William Randolph, the second son, was born at Covington, Kentucky, opposite Cincinnati, November 10, 1809. He afterwards moved to Ohio, lived awhile at Chillicothe, and was a foreman in the work on the Wabash and Erie Canal. Removing to Indiana, he taught school near Rushville, and located at Shelbyville, where he was married to Martha Jane Meloy. Having engaged in a course of study with Dr. Morris at Shelbyville, he procured a medical library and moved west, settling in south-west Missouri, where he engaged in the practice of medicine in Green and Polk Counties. Dr. Mathews was among the early settlers of Lower Lake. Having crossed the plains in 1854, and imported some thoroughbred stock, he procured a band of California horses and formed a partnership with his nephew, C. N. Copsey, for raising draft horses, a business which they continued for many years. The land claim on which he lived at the time of his death was bought in 1854, and he brought out his family from Missouri, in 1856. As no regular schools were then organized in the Clear Lake country, he removed with his family to Yountville, Napa County, where he engaged in the practice of medicine. He represented Napa County, then including Lake, in the Legislature of 1858, and was the Democratic candidate for the Senate from this district at the following term, but Henry Edgerton, his opponent, was elected. Having removed to Lake in 1860, he was at the special election in 1861 elected County Clerk, and assisted in organizing the most economical county government in the State. Dr. Mathews always owned and conducted a farm, and gave much of his time to agricultural pursuits, and was at various times engaged in commercial and manufacturing enterprises, but with indifferent success. He never graduated from any college, commencing life in the Western States when educational facilities were limited, and depending on his own resources for a livelihood. From a sense of honor and a peculiar idea of propriety he refused the degree of M.D., which was tendered him by Dr. McDowell's Medical College. He at one time conducted a private class in the study of medicine, and his students passed their degrees at the medical college at St. Louis. He always held the highest regard for the authority of the medical schools, and was himself always a hard student, keeping abreast with the medical literature of the day, but he regarded the distinction of being a self-made man as an honor equal to any which could be conferred by an institution of learning. He never sought for or desired any higher recognition of his professional skill than was afforded by his own abundant success as a practitioner. He was generally on intimate terms and friendly relations with his acquaintances in the faculty, and only abandoned the practice of medicine as a business when his years and infirmities called for rest. In the duties of his professional life a generous and charitable disposition ever stood in the way of his financial success, and he always regarded it as an honorable privilege and duty to minister to the wants of the poor and friendless. Politically, Dr. Mathews was a Democrat, having always worked earnestly for that organization since the dissolution of the Whig party at the election of Harrison and Tyler. He took a deep interest in all local enterprises, educational, charitable, and political, and too often made a personal sacrifice to promote the success of such undertakings. He was possessed of strong passions, but made it a rule of life and honor to keep them within bounds. He was of a steady, muscular temperament, and capable of great endurance. Having a resolute disposition he was a vigilant foe, and a true and faithful friend. The traits of his character were moral, but not distinctively religious. Of a dignified demeanor, urbane and sociable, he placed a high value on a good reputation; and elevation and refinement of feeling, dignity and honor, were among the personal qualities which he most admired and esteemed among men. In his last years he affected with paralysis. Dr. Mathews died at his homestead near Lower Lake, October 6, 1880, after a lingering illness.



MAXWELL, Thomas P.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 264

Was born in Virginia February 11, 1831. When but a child he, with his parents, moved to Indiana, but after a short stay they took up their residence in Illinois, and remained there seven years. They then moved to Missouri, where they remained until 1849, when they crossed the plains to California and settled near Stockton. The subject of this sketch went to the mines, where he spent the winter in mining, and in the spring returned to Stockton and engaged in stock raising until 1864, when he came to Lake County and settled near Upper Lake, where he is engaged in farming.



MAYBEE, Hial N.


From "Memorial and Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Company, 1891. pg. 342-343

Hial N. Maybee, nurseryman and orchardist, near Lakeport, was born in Canada, August 6, 1835. His parents were natives of Dutchess County, New York, and moved to Canada, then back to Michigan.
Hial received a common-school education while at home with his parents in Michigan. He afterward attended Bacon, Bryant & Strattons' Mercantile College in Cincinnati, where he graduated in 1859. He then went to Stevens' Point, Wisconsin, where he engaged in the wholesale lumber business, in partnership with his brother. He remained in business in Stevens' Point until 1865. In the spring of that year he sold out and went to New York city, where he took passage on the steamer Golden Rule, which was wrecked on Ronkador, on French Keys, May 29. There were 1,000 passengers on board, all of whom excepting one escaped to the reef, where they subsisted for eleven days. On June 9 they were rescued by the gunboat Georgia, and taken to Aspinwall, from where they came to California and arrived in San Francisco, July 1. Mr. Maybee first settled in Nevada, Marin County, where he bought land and engaged in dairying for seven years. In 1872 he sold out and went to Alameda, where he engaged in contracting and building. In 1876 he went to Buckeye Valley, five miles west of Ione in Amador County, where he engaged in farming and nursery business. He also worked some at carpentering, having secured several contracts from the railroad company. In 1881 he returned to Alameda, where he again followed the business of contracting and building for two years. In 1883 he came to Lake County and bought land two miles south of Lakeport, where he now resides. He has forty-one acres of land, which he devotes principally to nursery and small fruits. He has a nursery stock of about 50,000 trees. He has one acre planted in strawberries of different varieties, which yield an enormous quantity of luscious fruit. He also has blackberries, currants and other small fruits, the acreage of which is increasing each year. He has two fine, flowing artesian wells on his premises; also an excellent spring from which he conducts water to his residence through pipes for general uses.
Mr. Maybee has been twice married. His first wife was a Mrs. Carpenter, of Lincoln County, Maine, to whom he was married in 1873, and who lived only a short time after their marriage. In 1885 he was married to Mrs. Meyers, a native of Germany. She has two daughters from her first marriage, who are living in the old country. Mr. Maybee is a member of the I.O.O.F. and the A.O.U.W.

Transcribed by Kathy Sedler, July 2004.


McBEE, W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 261

Was born in St. Charles County, Missouri, in April, 1843. When but a child his parents moved to Page County, Iowa, where farming was prosecuted until 1863. At this date they crossed the plains to California, and arrived in Green Valley, Solano County, August 8th of the above year. In October, 1869, the subject of this sketch moved to Lake County, and settled on his present place located in the lower end of Long Valley, and about five miles from Sulphur Bank, where he is engaged in wool growing. Mr. McBee married, June 1, 1867, Miss Silva True, a native of Missouri. By this union they have four living children: Nettie, Addie, Henry and Archie; and have lost one, Hattie.



McCABE, Phillip Thurman

Phillip T. McCabe was born in Jefferson County, Missouri on February 3, 1822. His wife Lucinda McCutcheon McCabe was also born in Missouri on September 30, 1821. Phillip and Lucinda were married in MO. on August 27, 1843. They started their western migration stopping first at Navarro County, Texas. They left for California with three children in 1854. They traveled to California on the Santa Fe Trail using oxen and wagons. A child was born enroute and three more children were born in California. Children of Phillip and Lucinda McCabe were Mary Elizabeth 1846-1917, Narcissus Asinath 1848-1937, William Branham 1851-1926, Alpheus Branham 1854-1895, Phillip Thurman II 1857-1936, Lucinda Amanda 1859-1935, and Thomas Jefferson 1863- . Two children died in infancy while they lived in Texas.
They bought 160 acres at Hell's Bend, Big Valley in 1858. Lucinda McCabe died there on December 29, 1863. Phillip sold the ranch in Big Valley in 1865 and moved to Scott's Valley, where he lived until 1875. He also lived a number of years in Little Lake Valley. Phillip kept the family together and raised the 7 children. Phillip outlived Lucinda 49 years and never remarried. Phillip died in Upper Lake in December 21, 1912 at the age of 90 years old. Phillip and Lucinda McCabe are buried at the Hartley Cemetery in Lakeport.

Contributed by Gary & Caprice (McCabe) Cottle


McCULLOUGH, Robert


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 262

Is a native of Missouri, and was born March 13, 1837. Here he resided with his parents until 1854, when he crossed the plains to California, arriving on Feather River September 6th of the above year. He engaged at once in mining, which occupation he followed fourteen years. In 1868, he commenced teaming and farming in Plumas County which he followed until 1871, when he sold out and came to Lake County, and in 1874, settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred and ten acres, located on Scotts Creek, about four miles from Lakeport. He is engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. McCullough married March 25, 1869, Miss Margaret McClintock, a native of Indiana. Their children are: Martha E., Henry H., Etta M., Samuel G. and Millie E.



McINTIRE, Charles


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 262

Was born in Dublin County, North Carolina, February 10, 1812. Here he resided until 1840, the latter part of which time he spent in clerking in a store. At the above date he went to Holmes County, Mississippi, where farming occupied his time until 1849, when he came to California via Mexico. After spending about one month in San Francisco he went to the mines, where he followed a miner's life until 1851, when he went to Napa County. Here he followed farming until the fall of 1865, when he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of three hundred and twenty acres, located about six miles from Kelseyville. Here he is engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. McIntire married January 6, 1857, Mrs. Margaret B. Starr, from Quincy, Illinois, by whom he has six living children: William R., Murdock, Clara, Sarah J., David F., and Ann A.; and have lost one, Oscar E.



McKINLEY, George E.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 264

The subject of this sketch, whose portrait appears in the body of this work, was born in New Brunswick, August 9, 1837. When he was five years of age, he with his parents moved to Iowa. They resided in Burlington, that State, until 1849, when they moved upon a farm and remained until 1852. In that year the subject of this sketch came across the Rocky Mountains and spent four years in Utah in the stock business. In 1856 he came to California, and after spending a few months in Plumas County, he came to Lake County, arriving in December of that year. After remaining here a short time he went to Napa Valley. In the summer of 1857 he returned to Lake County and settled on his present place in Loconoma Valley, about three miles north-west of Middletown, where he has since resided, being engaged in farming and stock raising. He has always lived an active and earnest life of usefulness, and is now enjoying the highest regard and esteem of a large circle of acquaintances. He was married December 10, 1862, to Miss Caroline Springston, a native of Pennsylvania. They have seven living children: Sidney, George, Eva, Ada, Lillie, Mary and Charles; and have lost one, Ella.



MERRITT, Rufus D.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 265

Was born in Franklin County, Maine, March 24, 1834. Here he received his education and resided with his parents on a farm until he was sixteen years of age. He then engaged in school teaching, which he followed during the winter season until 1857. In the meantime he worked on his brother's farm during the summer, and attended school during the spring and fall. On account of failing health he was obliged to change climate, hence he came to California via Panama, arriving at San Francisco about May 12, 1857. After about two weeks he went to Tuolumne County for the purpose of mining, but finding water very scarce he engaged in wood-chopping for about six weeks. He then engaged in mining which he followed till the fall of 1860. He then rented a ranch in the same county and followed farming for about one year. He then engaged again in mining through the winter, and in the spring of 1862, he engaged in the meat business, supplying the miners with that article of food. In the fall of 1863, he went to Alameda County and spent the winter on a farm. In the spring of 1864, he bought an interest in an express line between Oakland and San Francisco, which he conducted until the spring of 1866. He then started a hay and grain store on Broadway, Oakland, which he conducted for three years. In the fall of 1869, he went to San Jose and opened a hay, grain and coal store, which he conducted till the fall of 1871. He then came to Lake County and settled at Kelseyville, where he has since resided, being engaged in farming and raising sheep. He was married April 28, 1860, to Miss Caroline D. Wheeler, a native of Maine. By this union they have five living children: Mabel E., Marion E., Carrie A., Fred and Harry. They have lost one, Annie M.



MILES, Robert F. and James S.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 263-264

The first named was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, April 19, 1826. When he was but a child his parents moved to Ohio, and from Ohio to Wisconsin, where they settled on a farm. In 1852 Robert F., in company with his brother, James S., started across the plains with ox-teams, bound for California. After a trip occupying five months and eight days, they arrived at Nevada City September 8th of that year. They began mining operations at once on Kentucky Flat, and in the spring of 1853 they went to Goodyears Bar, where they remained until the fall of 1854. They then went to Camptonville, where they remained until the fall of 1856. They then went to Nevada City, where they mined about one year. We next find them in Brandy City, where they were engaged in the meat business for about three years. In January, 1858, they came to Lake County and located in Coyote Valley, where they engaged in the stock business. In the spring of 1862 James went to Idaho, where he mined until the fall of 1867, Robert remaining in Coyote Valley in the meantime. Upon the return of James, they proceeded to erect a saw mill above Middletown, known as the Miles & Amesbury Mill. They retained their interest in this mill until about 1870, when they came to Lower Lake, where they now reside, being engaged in the butchering and saloon business. Robert F. married, August 14, 1863, to Miss Josephine Harbin, a native of Missouri, and they have six living children, Varena, Sarah J., Mark M., Ida L., Robert F. and Thomas M. James S. was married October 18, 1876, to Miss Laura Simmons, of St. Helena, daughter of Colonel Simmons. They have one child, Charley S.



MILLER, Isaac


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 260

Is a native of Ohio, and was born May 10, 1831. At the age of seven years he, with his parents, moved to Indiana, where they resided about seven years, and then moved to Illinois. In 1854 the subject of this sketch, leaving his parents, settled in Iowa, where he followed farming and milling until 1864, when he came to California. Crossing the plains with a train of emigrants, he arrived at Siskiyou County October 10th of the above year. Here he followed farming for about two years, and then moved to Mendocino County, where he prosecuted the same avocation six years. We next find Mr. Miller in Lassen County, engaged in stock raising. Here he remained about five years, then returned to Mendocino County, where he spent one year. In October, 1878, he came to Lake County, and settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, located in Scotts Valley, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. Miller married, March 18, 1852, Miss Louisa J. Weller, a native of Kentucky. By this union they have four living children, Elizabeth R., John H., Mary F. and Minerva J. They have lost five.



MILLS, William H.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 261

Is a native of Jefferson County, New York, and was born March 3, 1841. When fifteen years of age, he, with his parents, moved to Minnesota, where he followed farming until June, 1873, when he came to California, and settled in Cobb Valley, Lake County. Here he spent one year, and then moved upon the place where he now lives, about five miles from Lakeport, in Big Valley, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. Mills married, May 22, 1866, Miss Lucinda Mason, a native of Pennsylvania. They have four living children: Willie Jay, Charley E., Daisy L., and Ida L.



MITCHELL, T. A. K.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 263

Was born in Ohio, June 5, 1848. When he was seven years of age his parents moved to Iowa. In 1867, the subject of this sketch returned to Ohio, where he served as an apprentice to the blacksmith trade for two and a half years. He then went to Kentucky where he was under instructions for one year. The succeeding year was spent in Tennessee at his trade, when he returned to Iowa and after following his trade there for one year he engaged in farming for one year. In 1873, he came to California, and after spending about four months in Lake County he went to Yolo County and worked at blacksmithing at the Reed Quicksilver Mine for about four months. He then returned to Lake County and was foreman of a blacksmith shop at Sulphur Bank for two and a half years, since which time he has been engaged in blacksmithing at Lower Lake. Mr. Mitchell is an industrious, good, and clever machinist, and is reaping the reward of industry. He was married July 10, 1872, to Miss Sarepta D. Bingham, a native of Illinois, by whom he has four children: Rosana D., Sarah G., Gregory W.C., and Mary E.



MOORE, J. H.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 260

Was born in Jackson County, Missouri, May 13, 1842. When but a child his parents crossed the plains and located in Sonoma County, where they resided until 1858, when they came to Lake County and settled in Scotts Valley. The subject of this sketch engaged in the stock business until 1871, when he opened a saloon at Lakeport, and in 1873 moved to Lower Lake and engaged in buying and selling stock until 1879, when he opened a saloon in Lower Lake, which business he has since followed. In the fall of 1879 he was elected to the office of Constable, which he still holds. Mr. Moore married, July 24, 1867, to Miss Jennie Bynum, a native of Missouri, daughter of Joseph Bynum, M.D., of Lower Lake. By this marriage they have two children: Crigler and Warren.



MORBY, P. J.


From "Memorial and Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Company, 1891

P.J. MORBY, a native of Sweden, was born in Linkoping, a city in central Sweden, January 13, 1850.  At the age of ten years he went to serve an apprenticeship in the harness and saddlery trade in his native town.  After serving five years, he traveled through Sweden and worked and worked as a journeyman.  In 1869 he went to Copenhagen, Denmark, where he worked at his trade one and a half years.  He then went to Berlin, Germany, where he worked for six months.  From here he traveled through France and England, on his way back to Sweden.  On his return to Sweden he opened a business for himself in Stockholm, where he remained till 1888.  On November 28th of that year he sailed for the United States, on the steamship Heckla, and landed in New York January 1, 1889.  From New York he came direct to Middletown, Lake County, California, where a brother resides, who had preceded him to this country.  One June 24th he bought out the harness and saddlery store of C.T. McHarvey in Lakeport, where he is now established in business.  He manufactures a greater portion of his stock of harness, and does a general line of repairing.
He was married in Stockholm, January 18, 1876, to Miss Christina Nyberg.  They have two children, a son and a daughter:  Seth and Rode.

Transcribed by:  Betty Wilson, August 2004  ©


MORLAND, Thomas


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Indiana, March 12, 1829. In 1855 he moved to Missouri, where he followed farming and raising stock, until 1857 when he crossed the plains to California, arriving in Yolo County in November of the above year. Here he followed farming until 1869 when he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of three hundred and twenty three acres, loacared near Rice's mill, where he is engaged in farming and stock raising.




MORRISON, Zeno


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 260

Was born in Arkansas June 7, 1833. Here he followed farming until 1852, when he crossed the plains with ox-teams to California. On arriving he settled in Sutter County and followed farming until 1866, when he came to Lake County and located in Scotts Valley. Mr. Morrison owns one hundred and sixty acres of land and is engaged in farming and stock raising. He married, July 17, 1859, Miss Louisa Jones, a native of Arkansas. Their children are, Robert A., Sarah J. and John W. A nephew, Charles A. Parish, also resides with the family.



MUNZ, Marcus


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 267

Is a native of St. Louis, Missouri, and was born April 21, 1835. When he was but a child, his parents moved to Iowa. At the age of fifteen Marcus engaged with the American Fur Company with whom he remained until 1857. He then went to Fort Laramie, and acted as interpreter and did trading with the Indians for two years. He then went to the Indian Nation, where he remained until 1862, when he went to Kansas and engaged in farming until 1875, when he came to California, and after spending a short time at Dixon, came to Lake County, and located at Middletown, where he is engaged in the brewing business. Mr. Munz married, March 6, 1864, Miss Mary Robertson, a native of Indiana. Their children are, Andrew, Chrysanthea, William, Alice and Emma. They have lost one, Rosie.



MURDOCK, Gawn


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 262-263

Was born in Ireland July 4, 1823. In 1844 he came to America and located in Arkansas, where he spent about two years in pork packing. He then went to Ohio, where he followed farming until 1852, when he returned to Arkansas, and after spending a short time, started across the plains for California. After a tedious trip with ox-teams Sacramento was reached September 10, 1852. The subject of this sketch engaged in mining, which he followed at different places until 1855, when he bought a hotel in Placer County, which after about eight months, he sold, and in January, 1856, moved to Sutter County, where he followed dairying until the fall of 1857, when we find him in Butte County engaged in stock raising and farming. This he followed until 1874 when he moved to Lake County, and at present is engaged in farming about two miles from Upper Lake. Mr. Murdock married March 21, 1852, Miss Ellen Shields, a native of Ireland. They have three living children: George G., Elizabeth and Annie; and have lost two, John S. and William.



MUSICK, Lansing


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

p.70 - CLEAR LAKE TOWNSHIP - ...There were two voting precincts in the county at that time, known as Upper and Lower Lake, and they were embraced in the Third Supervisors' District of Napa County. At the general election of 1855, R. H. Lawrence was elected Justice of Hot Springs Township and L. Musick, Constable, both residing in Lake (Lake County area was in Napa County at the time)

page 65, - "In the spring of 1855 Lansing T. Musick and Joseph Willard came in and settled, the former on the east side of Clover Creek and the latter on the west side. Willard was engaged in hog ranching. They both had families. Musick's family consisted of his wife and four sons, ranging from nine to eighteen years of age, and one daughter, and Willard had a wife and one or two children. (This was in Upper Lake)

page 67 - "Colonel Lansing Musick arrived in the fall of 1854, and located on the east side of Clover Creek, just below the town of Upper Lake. At this time there were lots of wild hogs in the tules and the bears did not seem to bother them at all.

page 71 - CLEAR LAKE TOWNSHIP ..... At this election (general election of 1856) L. T. Musick was elected Supervisor from Clear Lake Township.

page 163 - LAKEPORT - ...and Colonel Lansing T. Musick had a hotel here at this time also. A photograph (not shown) of the place taken about that time, shows the hotel, now Greene's Hotel, as a squatre, box-looking building, without the veranda and wings, which it now has.

(See INGRAM biography for Mandana Musick)


"N"

NEVIL, Malinda


From "Lake County Bee" June 23, 1916

Out in Hartley Cemetery, in a quiet, shady spot, there stands a simple weather-beaten marble slab, which fills the stranger there with astonishment. It bears the name of Malinda Nevil Thompson, age 111 years.
According to the statement of one of her grand-daughters, Mrs. Susan Manlove, this old pioneer lady was born in Kintucky, Jan. 21, 1757 and died in Big Valley, Lake County, Cal. Jan. 21 1869 having rounded our her 112th year to completion. Her death was due to a fall which caused a broken hip. Owing to a mistake somewhere, the engraver had put down on her monument 111 years instead of 112, and the error was not discovered in time to rectify.
Malinda Nevil Thompson was the daughter of Capt. Wm. Nevil, a captain under Washington in the Revolutionary War. She was the mother of eight sons and two daughters. Her oldest son, Jesse Thompson, represented his district in the State Senate of Missouri for fourteen years. She came to California in early days with her youngest son, James Carlisle Thompson and his family, who settled in what is now known as the Covey Ranch in Big Valley. James Thompson had five children, two sons and three daughters, all of whom grew to maturity in Lake County. They were Dan, Nevil, Susan Ione [?], who married Wm. H. Manlove, the first sheriff of Lake County; California M., who married L. A. Young, a prominent lumber dealer and, at one time, Supervisor of District 4; and Mrs. Mary Dunnigan, who left Lake County a number of years ago, but is well remembered by old settlers. Dan Thompson moved to Texas, but is now living in Imperial Valley, Cal. Nevil Thompson had three sons and one daughter, Glen, Quint and Curtis Thompson, and Mrs. Elmer Watkins, all of whom are prosperous and highly esteemed citizens of Big Valley.
Mrs. Susan Manlove, who now resides in Lakeport, is the mother of two sons and six daughters, some of whom are living in Lake County; Mrs. Belle Mathews, wife of County Clerk Shafter Mathews; Mrs. Frank Noel of Lower Lake, a successful teacher and an incoming member of our county Board of Education; and James Manlove, a well-to-do farmer of Scotts Valley.
Mrs. California Young has six children only one of whom resides in Lake County, Mrs. Anna Starkey, wife of William Starkey, a prominent horticulturist of this county.
Such in brief are the names of some of the decendants of this remarkable old lady, who have helped to make Lake County history.



"O"

OLIVER, H. A.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 267

The subject of this sketch was born in Pekin, Tazewell County, Illinois, April 12, 1843. When he was but a child, his parents moved to Chicago, where his mother died when H.A. was only six years old. In 1850 the father came to California, leaving the boy with his grandparents for a short time, when they died. He then attended school, and worked out at times, until April, 1861, when he was found among the first who "went at their country's call," and enlisted as private in Company "E," 16th Regiment Illinois Volunteers. Although entering the service as a private, he was in a short time promoted to the office of Sergeant, then Orderly Sergeant, and finally was chosen as Captain of Company "G," 154th Illinois Volunteers. In all he served about four and a half years, and at the close of the war was mustered out of the service at Springfield, Illinois. He then returned to Carthage, Illinois, and engaged in clerking in a store in Hancock County. At the end of sixteen months he went to Kansas, and was engaged in farming and merchandising until 1871, when he came to California. He came to Lake County in October of that year, and engaged in farming in Coyote Valley until 1875, when he was elected to the position of County Clerk, which office he still holds, giving entire satisfaction to the people of the county. In his official and social relations Mr. Oliver is a pleasant and genial gentleman, and in his office no more accommodating man can be found. He was married February 22, 1867, to Miss Sarah J. Howard, a native of Ohio, and their children are Lizzie, Mettie, Bertha and Charles E.



"P"

PALMER, Jasper V.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 268-269

Was born in Steuben County, New York, September 29, 1836. When eleven years of age his parents moved to Illinois. Here young Jasper resided with his parents on a farm until 1854, when he concluded to go West, and accordingly set sail in a "prairie schooner," and crossed the plains, arriving in California sometime in October of the above year. The first year was spent in mining and the second in farming at Yreka. He then returned via Panama to New York, and after a short time went to Illinois, where farming was prosecuted until 1860, when he again crossed the plains and arrived late in the fall. The winter was spent at Marysville, and in the spring of 1861 we find him engaged in the wood business in Silver City, Nevada, which he followed for about eighteen months. He next engaged in farming in Yolo County until 1870, at which time he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of four hundred acres, located in Morgan Valley. Farming, stock raising and wool growing comprise his business. Mr. Palmer married, October 22, 1859, Miss Deborah Wing, a native of New York. By this union they have five living children: Carrie, Alice, Frances, Nettie, and Jasper; and have lost one, Eddie.



PAPSON, William


From "The History of the Coast Counties" by James Miller Quinn, 1907

As a pioneer William Papson is remembered among the early settlers of California and his name held in the highest esteem by all who ever knew him. He was born in Hillsdale, New York, in 1831, his father having emigrated from his home in England and located in New York. Reared to young manhood in his native state and educated in the public schools, he was well equipped for the battle of life, and in 1852, at the age of twenty-one years, he outfitted with ox-teams and crossed the plains to California. He came safely through the hardships and dangers of the trip, and upon his arrival in the state he followed the example of the great majority of the settlers of the west and engaged in mining. He was first located in Plumas county, where he continued for a time, but having been trained to an agricultural life he soon became interested in this pursuit and decided to purchase a farm. He settled near San Jose and engaged in general farming and fruit raising and there, March 8, 1865, he married Miss Matilda Freer. She was born in Atchison county, MO., a daughter of William H. Freer, who brought his family across the plains in 1849. After marriage Mr. and Mrs. Papson continued to farm in that section for the period of three years, when they removed to San Felipe and followed ranching for seven years. Returning to Santa Clara County they again engaged in farming in the vicinity of Berryessa and after three years removed to Los Gatos and made that place their home for seven years. They were principally occupied during this time in horticulture, in which they were very successful. Removing to Lake County in 1888 Mr. Papson purchased a ranch near Upper Lake and engaged extensively in the raising of stock, grain and hay. He also owned one hundred and thirty-four acres on the banks of Lula Lake (Tule Lake?), where his death occurred July 12, 1897. He was a citizen of worth and works, interested in the movements of the day, and always ready to lend his aid in matters of public import. He was a Republican in politics but never cared for official recognition. Fraternally he was made a Mason in San Jose Lodge No. 10, F. & A.M.
Mr. and Mrs Papson were the parents of one son, George W., who has charge of the home place in Lake County. After the death of her husband Mrs. Papson remained in Lake County until January 1900, when she located on the old home place near Savannah, and is now residing with her mother on the old Freer homestead in the vicinity of El Monte, Los Angeles County.



PARDEE, George W.


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

GEORGE W. PARDEE, a native of England, was born in Liverpool, February 18, 1852. His father was a seafaring man, and was captain of a vessel. In 1854 he emigrated to America and settled in Maryland. Here George W. received a limited education in the common schools. When quite young he went to Baltimore, where he served an apprenticeship, learning the blacksmiths’ trade, remaining in the same shop for seven years. He then went to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he worked for a year and a half as a journeyman. In 1869 he went to Denver, Colorado, and remained three years, working the first year for Ed. Westcote, and the next two years for George Tritch and William Allender. He then went to Georgetown and worked for Hood & Burnett, who were running the New England mine, a year and a half. He then went to Rosita, Colorado, where he worked at his trade two and a half years. In 1874 he came to California, remaining about eight months in San Francisco. In 1875 he came to Middletown, Lake County, and worked till 1877, then came to Lower Lake. After working two years here, he engaged to work for the Sulphur Bank Quicksilver mine, in Lake County, where he remained for four years. He then returned to Lower Lake and engaged in business for himself where he has remained till the present time. Being industrious and honest, he has been successful and has the confidence and esteem of the community in which he lives. He owns three houses and lots, beautifully located in the best part of the town of Lower Lake, one of which he occupies as a home: the others are occupied by tenants.
He was married in 1879, to Miss Mollie Allen. They have two children, William and Lucetta, aged ten and five years respectively. Mr. Pardee is a member of the I.O.O.F.

Transcribed by: Betty Wilson


PHELAN, N.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 269

Is a native of Ireland, and was born in the city of Kilkenny in 1832. In 1845 he came to the United States, and in 1850 he came via Panama to California. He came to Lake County in August, 1857, and in 1864 was elected to the position of County Assessor, which office he held by re-election until 1868. From 1874 to 1878 he held the office of deputy sheriff, and was deputy clerk from 1878 to 1880. In 1879 he was elected County Assessor, which office he now holds.



PHILLIPS, C. W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 268

Was born in Iowa, October 12, 1850. When fourteen years of age, he, with parents, crossed the plains to California, and arrived in Contra Costa County in October, 1864. Here they engaged in farming which business they prosecuted until 1871, when they came to Lake County and settled on a farm near Pearson Springs. His father is at present residing at the toll-house on the road leading from Lakeport to Middletown, which road he has leased. The subject of this sketch is conducting the farm above mentioned. He was married, September 16, 1878, to Miss Ettie Smith, a native of California.



PINER, C. A.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 267-268

Was born in Callaway County, Missouri, December 6, 1827. When about ten years of age his parents moved to Dade County, that State, where they resided until 1849, when they concluded to visit the land of gold, and accordingly set sail in a "prairie schooner," and after a tedious journey across the plains arrived at Lassen Ranch October 6th of the above year. The subject of this sketch engaged at once in mining which he followed for one year; then went to Sonoma County and engaged in dairying near Santa Rosa until 1858, when, on account of failing health, he moved to Mendocino County and settled about three miles south from Ukiah. Here he followed farming and stock raising until 1861, when he came to Lake County and prosecuted his former occupation for about eight years, just west from Kelseyville. He then settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred and forty acres, located about one mile from Kelseyville, at the foot of Uncle Sam Mountain, where he is engaged in dairying and wool growing. Mr. Piner married, March 2, 1848, Miss Sarah A. Hand, a native of Tennessee. By this union they have nine living children: George W., Eliza J., Sarah C., Mary E., Charles S., John S., Matilda L., William H. and Rosie M. They have lost one, Anna V.



POLK, Robert T.


From "History of Mendocino and Lake Counties California", 1914
by Aurelius O. Carpenter and Percy H. Millberry, Pages 843-5

The various members of the Polk family of Lake county are worthy representatives of a name which from its association with United States history alone would command respect. Planted in this country in early Colonial days, it is typical of the best in the Scotch-Irish element whose strong intellectual and moral qualities set a high standard of citizenship during the formative period of the nation. Robert T. Polk's father, T. W. Polk, was an own cousin of James Knox Polk, eleventh president of the United States, being one of the grandsons of Ezekiel Polk.
We give the genealogy as it appears in the "Genealogies of the Presidents": "James K. Polk, born in Mecklenburg county, N. C., November 2, 1795, son of Samuel (1771-1827) and Jane Knox (1773-1848) Polk, grandson of Ezekiel (born about 1737) and Mary Wilson (daughter of Samuel Wilson) Polk; and great-grandson of William (1701-1769) and Mary Knox Pollock. William Pollock (the original form of the name 'Polk') was the son of Robert (died 1727) and Magdalena Tasker Pollock, who emigrated with their family from County Londonderry, Ireland, to Somerset county, Md., about 1694. William Pollock removed from Dorchester county, Md., to Hopewell township, Cumberland county, Pa., about 1738, and thence, a few years later, to Mecklenburg county, North Carolina."
Other authorities say Robert Pollock came from Ireland in 1659 or 1660 and settled in Maryland in the latter year; he changed the name to Polk. They also vary from the former account in stating that he came from Ross, County Donegal, Ireland. Col. Thomas Polk, brother of Ezekiel, was chairman of the Mecklenburg convention which adopted what is termed the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, long before the legislature of Virginia instructed her delegates to the Continental Congress to vote for separation from Great Britain. He was subsequently a member of Congress and colonel of the Fourth Regiment, North Carolina militia.
Ezekiel Polk was captain of a company of rangers during the Revolution and did service in the woods and mountains protecting the frontier from invasion of the Indian allies of Great Britain. He was also an active member of the Mecklenburg convention.
T. W. Polk, grandson of Ezekiel Polk, was born in Indiana, and spent his early life in his native state. There he married Eliza La Rue, a native of Ohio, and of the six children born to them but two survive, Robert T. and Nellie, Mrs. McDougall, who resides at Hollywood, Los Angeles, Cal. The other four died when young, all unmarried. Mr. and Mrs. Polk lived at various places before deciding to come to California, in 1864, making the trip from Ohio and across the Isthmus of Panama. Mr. Polk had owned slaves and considerable property, but having lost his servants through the Emancipation Proclamation had very little left when he determined to begin life over again on the Pacific coast. He first settled in Napa county, living there for twenty years, during which he prospered steadily, owning two pieces of land there, which he sold before his removal to Lake county, in 1884. At that time he was quite well-to-do, but he was getting old, and so his son Robert has had the management of the home ranch ever since the family arrived here. Mr. Polk died on his ranch about twelve years ago, surviving his wife for two or three years. Her death occurred at Lakeport, Robert T. Polk being at that time engaged in the livery business there and residing in the town.
Robert T. Polk was born December 5, 1852, in Missouri, and though only in his twelfth year when the family came to California had lived in various states, Kansas City, Mo., Arkansas, Texas and Ohio. The next year the father made a settlement in Napa county, and though but a youth of thirteen the son did a man's work from that time, being depended upon as the reliable assistant at home. He could drive a team as well as any man, and handled all the other work with the same skill, which was especially fortunate because he was the only son, and his father took pride as well as comfort in his help. Besides the common and grammar school advantages which Napa county afforded at that day he had a course at the Lincoln grammar school in San Francisco, from which he was graduated in the year 1872. Returning to the home place, he continued to work with his father, and moved with him to Lake county in 1884, settling on the fine place just east of Upper Lake, and in the East Upper Lake precinct, which he still owns and now resides upon. The father built the substantial dwelling which is on this property, and Robert T. Polk has further improved it with fine large barns. He holds two hundred and ninety-seven acres, his father having divided up the land between the mother and two children about four years before he died. Mr. Polk follows general farming, and is heavily interested in stock raising, having cattle, horses and hogs and making a specialty of the latter, raising between two and three hundred every year.
Mr. Polk's personal standing is fully equal to his good reputation as a business man of ability and strict integrity. He is a prominent Odd Fellow, belonging to Upper Lake Lodge, No. 241, of which he has been a past grand for twenty years, and which he has represented in the grand lodge at Los Angeles and Sacramento. On political questions he is usually in sympathy with the Democratic party, but he endeavors to support such policies as he believes will work the greatest good to the greatest numbers.
While a resident of Napa county Mr. Polk was married to Miss Evangeline Hawkins, daughter of H. B. Hawkins, late of Napa county, and they had one child when they came to Lake county with Mr. Polk's parents. Three sons have been born to them; Percy W. is a druggist and in business at Upper Lake; he married Lula Clark, of Blacks Station, Yolo county, Cal., and they have two children, Helen and Percy. Robert C., who also lives at Upper Lake, owns the drug store here in partnership with his brother, and they also have a sawmill on Bartlett mountain and an apple orchard in the same vicinity; he married Gertrude Clark (no relation to his brother's wife), of Upper Lake, and they have one child, Robert. Roy H., who is employed in the automobile business, in a garage at Oakland, Cal., married Ruth Cleveland. Mrs. R. T. Polk holds membership in the Presbyterian Church. She also belongs to the Rebekahs, the woman's auxiliary of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Contributed by Pat Bird



POLK, Thomas W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Knox County, Indiana, March 4, 1816. In 1833 his parents moved to Logansport, where he resided for one year. In the spring of 1834 he went to Jackson County, Missouri, and helped lay out the town of Westport, and followed clerking in that place for two years. In 1836 he, with his father and a Mr. Scott, began trading with the Indians in the Indian Territory, which he followed for six years. He then returned to Missouri and remained until the breaking out of the Rebellion, when he with his family moved to Dallas, Texas, where they remained one year. They then went to Arkansas and lived there six months. December 23, 1863, he started for California from New York, arriving in San Francisco January 25, 1864. He went to San José and began dairying, and lived in other places until he came to Napa County and located in Cherry Valley, where he owns three thousand acres of land. He was married October 5, 1837. The children are, Nellie, born November 12, 1849, and Robert T., born December 5, 1852.

Contributed by Pat Bird



POSTON, Dallas


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 269

Was born in Virginia, January 9, 1844. When he was fifteen years of age he, with his parents, moved to Missouri. Here they followed farming until the spring of 1870, when the subject of this sketch went to Crawford County, Kansas, where he prosecuted farming until 1874. At this date he came to California and located at the Great Western Quicksilver Mine, where he still resides, being engaged in butchering. Mr. Poston married, January 29, 1864, Miss Mary J. Funk, a native of Missouri. By this union they have six children: William, Cora, Charles, Emery, Ira and Evan; and have lost two, Vina and Sarah.



"Q"

QUIGLEY, R. V. S.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 269

Was born in Jefferson County, West Virginia, December 7, 1833. His father was a physician. Young Quigley attended school till he was sixteen years of age, when he went to Hagerstown, Maryland, and engaged at clerking for two years. He then returned home and began reading medicine under his father. Finding this too confining, he went to Norfolk and began his former occupation, which he followed till he came to California. He crossed the plains, and arrived in Sutter County in September, 1853. In the fall of 1854 he began work on a ranch, and followed it for about six years. He was then in the sheriff's office as deputy and under sheriff for about eight years. He then spent a short time in the livery business in Yuba City. In 1870, on account of ill-health, he came to Lake County and settled on his present place in the lower end of Long Valley. He represented Lake County in the Legislature in 1875-6. He was married, June 13, 1864, to Miss Margarete E. Linder, a native of Illinois. Their living children are, Nannie, Robert, Mary, Thomas and Lucy; and they have lost John and Julia.



"R"

RADCLIFF, William P.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 272

Was born in Virginia, April 7, 1837. Here he resided until 1858, when he came via Panama to California, and arrived at San Francisco May 28th of the above year. The first five years of his California life were spent on a farm in San Joaquin County. He then took a drove of horses to Shasta County, where he spent the winter of 1863-4, and in the spring of 1864 he went to Washington Territory. Here he spent one year, and then went to Montana, and after mining for about nine months, he returned to Shasta County, California, and engaged in stock raising. Here he remained until 1869, when he went to Oregon, and, after a short stay, came down overland to Mendocino County, California, where he followed stage-driving for a short time. He then returned to Virginia. Here he engaged in the lumber trade for one year, and then, in the winter of 1870, returned to California and located about two miles above Upper Lake, where he farmed, and also conducted the stage line leading from Lakeport to Bartlett Springs, until 1873. In 1871 Mr. Radcliff, in company with Dr. Dexter Witter, bought the property known as Witter Springs, and in 1873 he moved upon the property, where he has since resided. In 1880 the subject of this sketch bought Dr. Witter's interest in the property, and conducted it alone, as well as a stage line between Lakeport and Ukiah, until the summer of 1881.



RANTZ, William D.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 270

Was born in Indiana, December 25, 1841. When twelve years of age he, with his parents, moved to Wisconsin, and when seventeen years old he crossed the plains to California, leaving his parents behind. On arriving at Placerville, September 17, 1850, he engaged at once in mining, which he followed about eighteen months. He then engaged in dairying in El Dorado County, which he continued until 1874, when he sold out and came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of four hundred acres, located in the lower end of Scotts Valley, about seven miles from Lakeport, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. Rantz married, December 21, 1864, Miss Amelia T. Glines, a native of Iowa. Their children are, Stephen H., Nellie M., Leonard A., William A. and Maud. They have lost two: Flora M. and Eva.



READ, Samuel

1. Samuel Read, born 11/12/1809, Missouri; died 03/08/1883, Orland, California married Elizabeth Leach, born 04/01/1811, Kentucky; died 04/12/1858, Dixon,CA. *These families traveled back and forth between in the east, possibly on business or trade. In 1852 they decided on the push on west and came directly to California with son Joseph L. Read.
     Children (possibly more):
    
2. Joseph Lilburn Read, born 07/29/1837, Scotts County, Kentucky; died 07/23/1927, Middletown, California; married Margaret C. Davis, born June 30, 1844, Missouri; died Feb. 11, 1923, Middletown, California.   Joseph and Margaret met in California and married on 10/31/1861 in Kelseyville, CA.

They had 12 children, the following list are the only ones known to have lived to adulthood:

1) Susan L Read (she is my great great grandmother)
2) Thomas Albert
3) Warren
4) Ralph (believed to have no children)

Contributed by Mark A. Rayner



Excerpts from "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

READ, JOSEPH L. Was born in Scott County, Kentucky, July 29, 1837. When he was but a child his parents moved to Sullivan County, Missouri, where they resided on a farm for fifteen years. In 1852 they crossed the plains to California, arriving at Diamond Springs October 15th of that year. In the spring of 1853 they moved to Sacramento County, where they followed mining until 1857, when they went to Solano County and engaged in farming, near Dixon. In 1861 the subject of this sketch began farming on his own account, which he prosecuted until 1874. He then came to Lake County, and settled on a farm about two miles from Middletown, where he was engaged in that occupation until 1878. Since that time he has been engaged in farming on rented land and in constructing roads until January, 1881, when he was appointed Postmaster at Middletown, which position he is now holding. In March, 1881, he was appointed a Notary Public in and for Lake County by Governor George C. Perkins. Mr. Read was married, October 31, 1861, to Miss Margaret C. Davis, a native of Illinois, and they have five living children: Susan L., John W. G., Joseph Lee, Johanna E. and Thomas A.; and have lost three: George E., Jane and Ella.



REYNOLDS, Robert G.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born near Miffentown, in Juniata County, Pennsylvania, in 1841. Here he resided on a farm until he was fourteen, when he was sent to school at the Tuscarora Academy where he remained four years. He then went to Illinois, where he taught school for six years. He then returned to Pennsylvania, and enlisted in the 198th Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served first as private and afterwards as hospital steward, til the close of the war. Then, returning to Illinois, he taught school for one year at Rockwood, Randolph County, where, on December 25, 1866 he married Miss Minnie Clendenin, a native of Illinois. He then engaged in merchandising, first in partnership with William G. Young, now of Kelseyville, and afterwards as a druggist, alone, at Steeles Mills and Coulterville till 1873. During the years 1869 to 1871 he attended the St. Louis Medical College, from which he graduated March 8, 1871. In September 1873, he moved with his family to California and settled in Upper Lake, where he engaged in merchandising and the practice of medicine until June 1881, when he removed to Lakeport where, on the 23rd of the same month, he was bereaved of his excellent wife by death. He has seven living children, five boys and two girls, named Hattie Grace, Harry C., Robert G., William C., Minnie Bell, Frederic A. and John H. He is associated in the mercantile business with Godwin Scudamore, of Scotts Valley, having stores in Lakeport, Upper Lake and Bartlett Springs.




RIFFE, Winchester


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 271-272

Was born in Green County, Kentucky, February 7, 1824. When he was but a child his parents moved to Missouri, where the subject of this sketch remained until 1846, when he crossed the plains to California. In 1847 he returned across the plains to Missouri, and from there, in the spring of 1848, went to Mexico, where he served in the Mexican War until the fall of that year, and in 1849 he again crossed the plains to California. After spending one winter in the mines he engaged in farming near Stockton, which he followed about seven years. The next four years were spent in the stock business, and in 1865 he came to Lake County, and at present owns about one hundred and sixty acres, situated about two miles east from Upper Lake, where he is engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Riffe married, August 15, 1849, Miss Lucy A. Maxwell, and their living children are, Abram T., James H., Mary M., Jessie S., John W., Winchester, Calvin, Lucy M., Richard A. and Jacob C.; and they have lost three: Leonard, William L. and Sarah M.



ROBBINS, Thomas J.


From "Memorial & Biographical History of Northern California", The Lewis Publishing Co., 1891

THOMAS J. ROBBINS, was born in San Antonio, Texas, March 30, 1845. His parents were natives of Tennessee. They were among the early settlers of Texas. In 1847 they moved to Ray County, Missouri, where they remained till 1852. In that year they crossed the plains to California and settled in Sonoma County. In 1868 they returned to Missouri.
Thomas J., the subject of this sketch, received his education in the public schools of Sonoma County. At the age of seventeen he enlisted in the Second Regiment California Volunteers, Company D. The regiment rendezvoused from September to November, 1861, at San Francisco, awaiting orders. In November it was ordered to Fort Collins, near the line of British Columbia. From Fort Collins they returned to San Francisco, and were then ordered to Fort Gaston, Humboldt County, where they remained till 1868, when the regiment was ordered to San Francisco for final discharge.
After being discharged, Mr. Robbins traveled over the State for two years, making no permanent settlement. In 1868 he came to Lake County, where he worked in quicksilver mines for ten years. In 1878 he discovered a valuable compound, which he named “Oil of Orioto,” and on which he secured a patent February 24, 1880. This remedy has proved to be very efficacious, in many diseases, both for man and beast, and has become justly celebrated throughout the State. Mr. Robbins was married January 8, 1868, to Miss Hester Ann Goodwin, a native of Salt Lake, Utah. They have seven children: Ada, Minnie, Lena, Hila, Hugh, Willie Leroy and Martin. He is a member of Rosseau Post, No. 64, Grand Army of the Republic, located at Kelseyville, Lake County.

Transcribed by: Betty Wilson


ROBINSON, Jesse B.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 272-273

Was born in Missouri October 4, 1824. At the age of twenty-one he began an apprenticeship to the tanner's and currier's trade in St. Genevieve County, that State, and at the end of eighteen months he was put in charge of the establishment, where he remained for about the same length of time. In March, 1849, he started across the plains for California, and arrived in Sacramento in September, where he spent the winter, engaged in hotel-keeping. In the spring of 1850 he went to the mines, where he remained until the fall of 1851, when he settled at Plumas, on the Feather River, and engaged in hotel-keeping for about two and a half years. He then farmed till 1857, when he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred and thirty acres, about two miles south of Upper Lake, where he has since resided, being engaged in stock raising and farming. He was married, November 20, 1855, to Miss Eliza Pickett, a native of Ireland. Their children are, Thomas B., Emma F., John L., Eliza E. and Jennie B.



ROCCA, Andrew


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 269-270

This gentleman, whose portrait will be found in the body of this work, was born in Italy, October 8, 1838. At the age of fifteen he came to California and located in Mariposa County, where he engaged in mining for three years. He then went to Tuolumne County and followed mining on the Tuolumne River for about one year. He then purchased a ditch which he conducted for about six years, using the water in his own operations and selling it to others. He then disposed of his ditch and returned to Mariposa County and purchased the celebrated Bower Cave Mine, where he mined for fourteen months. Then, on account of poor health, he went to San Francisco, where he was treated for about four months. While here he bought into the Golden Rock Water Company's ditch in Tuolumne County, and returned to that county, where he remained for eight years. He then proceeded to Shasta County and became interested in the Spring Creek Ditch Mining Company, and remained there about sixteen months. While there in 1876 he was elected by the Directors as Superintendent of the Great Western Quicksilver Mine, in Lake County, where he has since resided. He is a thorough-going, practical miner, and is the right man for the position he holds. He was married, April 14, 1880, to Miss Mary Thompson.



ROSEBROUGH, J. W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 270

Was born in Virginia, October 13, 1813. When he was seventeen years of age his parents moved to Missouri, where they followed farming for twelve years. The subject of this sketch enlisted in the Mexican War and served for fourteen months. He then returned to Missouri, where he remained until May, 1849, when he started across the plains for California. On arriving he engaged at once in mining, which he followed until the succeeding June, when he opened a store at Ringold, near Hangtown. This business he prosecuted until July, 1851, when he sold out and moved to Sacramento, where hotel-keeping was followed about ten months. We next fine Mr. Rosebrough in Yolo County, farming, where he remained until October, 1866, at which time he came to Lake County and settled near Kelseyville, where his former occupation was resumed until 1868, when he settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, located about three miles north from Rice's mill. He was married, April 2, 1851, to Miss Catharine Patton, a native of Alabama. They have two living children, Jennettie and Eliza; and have lost two, Robert and Sarah.



"S"

SCRANTON, Carlos P.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg 274

Was born in Ohio, May 14, 1830. Here he resided on a farm with his parents until 1851, at which time he crossed the plains to California with ox-teams. The first three years were spent in the mines at Placer County, after which he went to Sacramento County, where he remained until the fall of 1857, when he came to Lake County. After spending one year at Lower Lake he returned to Sacramento City, where about eight years were spent. He then returned to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of about three hundred acres, located about one mile and a half north from Lower Lake, where he is engaged in farming, stock raising and wool growing. During his residence in Sacramento Mr. Scranton received injuries at a fire which rendered him a cripple for life. He was married, in 1857, to Miss Alice Slater, a native of Illinois. She died December, 1867, leaving three living children: Maryetta, Robert E. and Lorenzo B. They lost one, John.



SCUDAMORE, Godwin


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg 273

Whose portrait will be found in the body of this work, was born in Herefordshire, England, November 28, 1824. He resided there until 1844, receiving, in the meantime, his education. In that year he came to America, landing in New York in November. He remained in New York but a short time, and then proceeded to New Orleans, where he worked in a tobacco factory for about one year. He then went to Cincinnati, where he spent one summer. He spent the winter following in New Orleans, and returned to Cincinnati in the spring, and located about nine miles from that city and engaged in farming. In March, 1853, he moved to Randolph County, Illinois, where he followed farming until July, 1862. He then enlisted in the United States Army, Volunteer Service, and was elected Second Lieutenant, which position he held until the following March, when he was promoted to the First Lieutenancy. Mr. Scudamore was captured and placed in the notorious Libby Prison at Richmond, where he was confined for nine months. He, with others, then made a bold strike for liberty, and he was fortunately successful. They managed to work a tunnel through under the walls of the prison, and on the night of February 9, 1864, he passed out and made good his escape. He immediately re-entered the service, and was shortly afterwards promoted to the position of Captain, and had command of two companies until the close of the war. He was engaged in many of the hardest battles of the Rebellion. After being mustered out of service, he returned to Randolph County, Illinois, where he resumed farming, in connection with merchandising, and continued thus engaged until October, 1869, when he came to California. After spending about one month in the vicinity of St. Helena, Napa County, he came to Lake County and settled on his present place in Scotts Valley, which consists of five hundred and sixty acres; and is also interested in a store at Lakeport, Upper Lake, and at Bartlett Springs, in connection with R. G. Reynolds, under the firm name of Scudamore, Reynolds & Co. Mr. Scudamore is a thorough-going business man, and a gentleman in the true sense of the word. His pleasant business relations with all prove the truth of the assertion, and his enterprise is evinced by the thoroughness with which he does whatever he puts his hand to. Married, September 17, 1849, Caroline A. Hampton Colby, who died January, 1866, leaving four children: Charlotte, Sarah J., Alice and Mary. He married, secondly, Miss Mary Clendenin, October 15, 1866, and by this union there are three living children: Lora E., Dick and Nannie. They have lost one, Joseph H.



SHATTUCK, D. O.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 274-275

Was born in Tennessee, September 17, 1831. When but a child he, with his parents, moved to Mississippi, where fifteen years were spent. They then moved to Louisiana, where they resided until 1849, when the subject of this sketch, in company with his father and two brothers, came to California via Panama, arriving at San Francisco April 3, 1850. The first four months were spent in the Custom House in San Francisco, after which he went to the mines and mined for four months. He then went to Sonoma County, and followed farming in Sonoma Valley until 1871, when, on account of failing health, he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of four hundred acres, located in Bachelor Valley, about five miles from Upper Lake, where he is engaged in farming, dairying and wool growing. Mr. Shattuck married, November 3, 1853, Miss P. Sneed, a native of Missouri. By this union they have six living children: Dickson S., Ella, James W., Charles S., Lizzie and George P.



SHAUL, B. F.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 274

Was born in Indiana, October 12, 1829. Here he resided on a farm until he was twenty-two years of age, when he came via Panama to California, arriving at San Francisco December 17, 1852. The first eight years were spent in mining in Grass Valley, and in June, 1860, he came to Lake County, and located at the Mountain mill. Here five years were spent in milling, after which he settled on his present place, consisting of three hundred and twenty acres, located about five miles from Kelseyville. Mr. Shaul married, November 5, 1865, Miss Georgie Maning, by whom he has seven children: George M., Annie M., Aaron B., Benjamin F., Henry B., Jessie S. and Ruth E.



SHEPARD, Michael


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 276

Was born in Massachusetts, May 5, 1835. When sixteen years of age he shipped on board the "New Jersey," for California. Rounding Cape Horn, they arrived at San Francisco October 11, 1849. The subject of this sketch went at once to the mines and followed mining until September, 1856, when he came to Lake County and settled in Bachelor Valley, where he still resides. He owns six hundred and forty acres of land, and is engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Shepard married, April 10, 1875, Mrs. Lucy Meredith, a native of Iowa. By this marriage they have one child, Birdie; and by her first marriage Mrs. Shepard has four children: Lottie, Maggie, Joseph and Shepherd. In the fall of 1866 his eyes were injured while plowing among some poisonous weeds, and for the next succeeding five years he was blind, or worse than blind. After eminent physicians had failed to cure, a lady, Mrs. J. A. Harris, of Lower Lake, effected an entire cure in a few months.



SHIRLEY, John Elliot


(Some information from "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881)

John Elliot Shirley was born in Missouri and came to California in 1859 at age 14. He rode across the plains muleback, herding cattle the whole way. A Sister, Mrs. Lucy Riggs, moved to Scotts Valley where she died in 1908. A brother, James W. Shirley became a teacher and died while serving his term as School Superintendant in Lake County. The widowed mother of John Elliot Shirley married George W. Tucker of Scotts Valley and they had one son, Joseph, now of Washington state.
In 1860 John E. and some members of his mother's family settled in Scotts Valley. He worked as a cow-puncher and in the sawmills. In 1867 he married Nancy E. Allen. Mrs. Shirley died in April 1900 leaving the following children: Ethan Allen Shirley, who died in 1910 leaving a widow and son Claire; Mrs. Susan J. Wilkinson of Kelseyville; Elizabeth G., widow of Henry Ingram of Sacramento; Bertha, widow of James L. Wilkinson of Sacramento; John Edgar of Coalinga; Mrs. Mildred Harris, operator of the Shirley Ranch; Mrs. Maude Pardee of Coalinga; and J. Paul, a Big Valley farmer.

Contributed by Peg Coady



SLEEPER, D. O.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Orange County, Vermont, November 27, 1825, where he resided on a farm until twenty-three years of age, when he went to Benton County, Iowa, where he engaged in farming. In May, 1852, he started across the plains for California, and arrived at Colfax October 6th of the same year. He engaged at once in mining, which he conducted, in connection with farming and teaming, until October 28, 1857, when he came to Lake County, and located on his present place, about two miles above the town of Upper Lake, where he has continued to reside ever since. He is engaged in farming, stock raising and wool growing. Mr. Sleeper married, in May, 1852, Miss Mary J. Way, a native of Indiana. They have five living children: Eveline, Charles, Ed., Jennie M. and Katie. They have lost Frank, Albert and Lee.




SLEEPER, Jerome M.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Vermont, December 17, 1840. When he was but a child his parents moved to Buffalo, where about six years were spent, when they returned to Chelsea, Vermont, where he resided with his parents until March, 1863, when he sailed for California, and arrived April following. He at once settled on a ranch about one mile west from Upper Lake, where he is engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Sleeper married, August 22, 1874, Miss Mary E. Sleeper, a native of California. By this union they have three children: Flora J., Ellery D. and Mary E.




SLEEPER, Morean


(His name is listed as Morean in the book, but everywhere else he is listed as Moreau)

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Is a native of Orange County, Vermont, and was born September 29, 1828. When fifteen years of age he went to New Hampshire, where he learned the mason's trade. After a residence there of two years he went to Wisconsin, where he followed his trade until 1850, when he went to St. Charles, Missouri. There he followed his trade for about two years, and then, after paying a visit to Wisconsin, New Hampshire and Vermont, he came to California via Panama. He arrived at San Francisco April 15, 1854. Here he worked at brick-laying until fall, when he went to the mines, and returned to San Francisco in the following spring, where, as before, he followed his trade through the summer, and in the fall went to Downieville, on the Yuba River. Here he followed mining until October 15, 1857, when he met with a serious accident, which resulted in the loss of his eye-sight and of one hand. The accident occurred as follows: Mr. Sleeper was sitting upon a large boulder, holding the tamping iron, in the act of filling tamp dirt upon a charge of powder which had already been put into the hole. He was assisted by a man who was using a sledge upon the iron Mr. Sleeper was holding. By some unknown means the powder became ignited, and while the tamping was going on the blast went off, blowing Mr. Sleeper about fifteen feet, destroying his eye-sight so that he has never been able to see since, and also mangling his right hand so as to necessitate amputation at the wrist. Immediately after the accident he went to San Francisco, where he was treated by Dr. Toland until about the middle of December, 1857, when he came to Lake County, where he has resided with his brother, D. O Sleeper, about two miles above Upper Lake. Since coming to this county the subject of this sketch has accumulated land until he now owns about eleven hundred acres.




SLOCUM, A. A.

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 276-277

Was born at Portsmouth, Rhode Island, A.D. 1824. He came to California by water, and arrived in September, 1849. He has followed sundry business callings with varied success. He settled in Lake County before its organization, and was at one time Associate Justice of the Court of Sessions of this county. He is at present engaged in farming and merchandising at Kelseyville, and is agent for Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express.



SMITH, Robert O.

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 276

Was born in Indiana, in 1832. When but a child his parents moved to Tennessee, and in 1840 moved again to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. After a residence here of one year they moved to Ohio, and after a year or so they moved to Virginia, where they resided about two years, and then took up their residence in Wisconsin, where they resided until 1849, when they started for California, and after spending the winter of 1849 in New Mexico, they arrived in California in November, 1850. After teaming and mining for a short time in the southern mines, the subject of this sketch engaged in farming near Stockton, in the San Joaquin Valley, until 1854, when he went to Sacramento. Here he remained, being engaged in different pursuits, until August, 1858, when he came to Lake County, and followed farming in Scotts Valley until 1863, when he established a brewery in the above-named valley, which he conducted until the fall of 1864, when he changed his location to where he now is, about one-half mile above Lakeport. Here he owns one hundred and sixty acres of land, which he works, as well as attending his brewery, a history of which will be found in its proper place. Mr. Smith married, February 6, 1856, Miss Caroline Holman, a native of Missouri. Their children are, Frances A., Emily J., Annie L., James R. and Caroline R.



SMITH, Wilburn

From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg. 277-278

Was born in North Carolina, February 17, 1824. At the age of fourteen he went to Missouri, and from there visited Texas and New Mexico. In 1850 he crossed the plains to California, arriving at Sacramento in August. He spent his first eighteen months in the mines, and then returned to Sacramento and worked on a ferry boat for about eighteen months. The next two years were spent in Yolo County, and the following four years in Green Valley, Solano County. A year was spent at teaming in Nevada, and eighteen months at farming in the same State. He then returned to Yolo County, and followed farming for three years. In the spring of 1869 he came to Lake County, and settled in Bachelor Valley, where he now owns three hundred and twenty acres of land, and is engaged in farming. He was married, May 30, 1858, to Miss Abbie Linder. They have one living child, Sarah E., and have lost three: Fannie, Richard and Carrie M.



STARKEY, William


Lake County Bee, November 14, 1935
WILLIAM STARKEY GREETS SISTER AFTER 61 YEARS

The joy of greeting his sister, who he had not seen for 61 years, was afforded W. H. Starkey, prominent Lakeport citizen, who went to San Francisco Saturday for the meeting. His sister, Mrs. Mary Wood, from Leavenworth, Kansas, plans to make her home now in San Franciso with her daughter.
Mr. Starkey was overjoyed in his anticipation of the meeting before he left here with his son-in-law, Miles McCormick, who went to the city to bring his wife home after several days spent on business in the metropolis.
Mr. Starkey, who is now in his 81st year, left the family home in Leavenworth at the age of 20, when his sister was 8. He came direct to California and since that time has been separated from his sister. Another sister, Mrs. Jane Beckley resides in Springfield, Mo. It was only ten years ago that Mr. Starkey met her for the first time in more than fifty years.
Mr. Starkey returned to Lakeport on Sunday evening, accompanying Mr. and Mrs. Miles McCormick. He states he enjoyed the visit beyond words and naturally he and his sister found their meeting too brief to talk over everything that has transpired during their sixty-one years' of separation, so they will meet many more times during the sister's visit on the coast, which is indefinite at this time.

[There is a picture for William Starkey and Mary C. Wood, photo by Courtesy of San Francisco Examiner.]

Contributed by Shirley Langdon Wilcox


STARR, M.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg 277

Was born in Canada West, July 6, 1835, where he spent his early youth in assisting his father in the flour mill. When young Starr was about eighteen years of age he, with his parents, moved to Wisconsin. Here they remained five years, when he moved to Iowa. At the end of another five years Mr. Starr came to California, arriving in August, 1861, having crossed the plains with horse-teams. He conducted a mill at Petaluma for the first four years, and then went to San Francisco, where he resided for three years, being engaged in dealing in hay and grain. In 1868 he erected and put in operation a flour mill at Oakland, which he conducted until 1871. He then went to Livermore Valley, where he conducted a mill for eighteen months. Thence he went to Santa Rosa, where he was engineer in the "City Mills" for the same length of time. In 1875 he came to Lake County and purchased the Lakeport Mill, which he has since conducted. He was married, June 11, 1856, to Miss Nancy A. Weatherbee, a native of Indiana. They have lost one child, William.



STEPHENS, John D.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg 275-276

Was born in East Tennessee, January 16, 1836. When about sixteen years of age, his father being dead, he, with his mother, moved to Arkansas, where they resided about three years. The subject of this sketch then came to California, coming across the plains with an ox-train, and arrived at Rough and Ready September 10, 1854, after a tedious trip of five months and ten days. Like all who came to California in those days of gold, he took at once to mining, which he followed until 1860, when he changed his avocation to that of teamster, which he continued until October, 1865, when he came to Lake County, and remained at Upper Lake until December of the above year, when he returned to the mines, and in August, 1866, again returned to Lake County. He settled on his present place, in Scotts Valley, in November of the above year. Mr. Stephens married, September 10, 1866, Miss Mary A. McLean. Their children are, Albert S., Laura E., Hector W., Augusta I. and John H.



SWEIKERT, Caspar


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881, Pg 277

Was born in Wittenburg, Germany, January 11, 1826, where he learned the blacksmith's trade, and followed it until 1850. He then came to America, and spent about four years in St. Louis, working at his trade. In 1854 he came to California via Panama, arriving at San Francisco in April of that year. He then went to Sacramento, where he followed his trade for nearly two years. In 1856 he went to Napa City and bought into a shop, and remained there until 1858. April 28th of that year he came to Lake County, and opened a shop at Upper Lake, which he conducted until 1873, when he purchased a ranch in Big Valley, where he farmed and followed his trade until April, 1876. He then bought and settled upon his present place, consisting of six hundred and thirty-nine acres, located in Coyote Valley, where he is engaged in farming and stock raising. He was married, April 12, 1860, to Miss Isabella Duffy, a native of New Orleans. They have three living children: Clara B., William H. and Augustus H. They have lost five: Jane S., Mary L., Emma M., Anna L. and Caspar C.



"T"

TALLMAN, George Thomas


From "History of Mendocino and Lake Counties California", 1914
by Aurelius O. Carpenter and Percy H. Millberry, Pages 890-1

The various health resorts in Lake county depend, for much of their popularity, upon their accessibility by road, many of them being situated in beautiful locations as yet unspoiled by the invasion of the railroad. The automobile has made it possible to reach such places without tedious and wearisome trips for those who desire to find natural beauty within easy access of their homes, and good roads are a necessary condition for the enjoyment of automobiling. The well-known resort of the Bartlett Springs Company is situated fifteen miles from Bartlett Landing, on the east side of Clear lake, or may be reached from the east by a longer trip, and the success of the resort is due in great measure to the good mountain roads by which it is approached, especially the one from the Landing, which runs over Bartlett mountain. To maintain these roads and keep them in safe condition is part of the work intrusted to George T. Tallman, who has been in the employ of the Bartlett Springs Company for the last fifteen years. He is also engaged as a teamster, being a very skillful driver--an important accomplishment, the heavy transportation of bottled water from the springs being a very lucrative branch of the business done by the company.
Mr. Tallman represents a pioneer family of Lake county, settled here since about 1857. His father, Rufus Tallman, was a native of Lansing, Mich., and crossing the plains in the early days settled in Lake county, where he spent the remainder of his industrious life, a respected citizen, following teaming and other work. He served as supervisor. His wife, Mary (Moore), of Scotts valley, died in 1912, when past sixty years of age, and he died at Upper Lake when about sixty years old. They were the parents of thirteen children: Sarah died when eight years old; Grace is the wife of Frank Norton, a carpenter of Oakland, Cal.; William, who is a teamster by occupation, resides at Williams, Cal.; Berdinia (deceased) was the wife of John Robinson, a carpenter, of Upper Lake (her only child is deceased); George Thomas is mentioned later; Fred met an accidental death on the railroad, near Sacramento, while working as a brakeman (he was twenty-two years old and unmarried); Evaline is the wife of George Twiggs and resides at Oakland; Winnie is the wife of Henry Riffe, a hotelkeeper, of Upper Lake; Burt died when five years old; Walter, Harry and Cleveland reside at Upper Lake; Lilburn is a resident of Yuba City.
George Thomas Tallman was born March 23, 1870, at Upper Lake, Lake county, and grew to manhood at that place, attending public school when a boy. He did not follow any special line of work in his youth, turning his hand to anything that would bring an honest dollar, and fifteen years ago entered the employ of the Bartlett Springs Company, in whose service he has remained continually since. As foreman for that concern he has been one of the trusted employees to whom much credit is given for the prosperity of the resort, being steady and to be relied upon in anything he undertakes. Visitors coming over the Northwestern Pacific route come by train to Pieta, thence by automobile to Lakeport, whence they cross Clear lake to Bartlett Landing. From that point they continue by automobile over Bartlett mountain to the resort, a delightful drive of fifteen miles through wild and romantically beautiful scenery, made doubly enjoyable because of the excellent roadway. Those who prefer to drive around the lake go by way of Lakeport and Upper Lake to Bartlett Landing. From the east there are good average mountain and valley roads, and the maintenance of all those which come within the province of the Bartlett Springs Company is under the charge of Mr. Tallman, who has discharged his duties intelligently and capably, in his other relations with the company as well as in this particular respect. Besides, he owns a four-horse team, engaged in hauling wood, doing road work, etc. Physically he is a large, powerfully built man, well adapted for his business and able to meet its requirements His industry and trustworthiness have earned him the respect of all his associates.
Mr. Tallman was married at Upper Lake, March 28, 1888, to Miss Melinda Porter, daughter of the late Edward Porter; her mother is now the wife of Charles Phelps, a ranchman, of Upper Lake. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Tallman: Edna is the wife of Clarence King, a farmer on Sutter Island, Sacramento county; they have one child, George. Martin Calvert is employed by the Bartlett Springs Company; he married Miss Adelia Clark, and they have a daughter, Dorothy B.

Contributed by Pat Bird



TALLMAN, R. C.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 282

Was born in Syracuse, New York, June 28, 1823. When he was but a child his parents moved to Canada, where they resided about two years, when they moved to Michigan. Here young Tallman grew up on a farm. In 1852 he, leaving his parents behind, came via Panama to California. He arrived at San Francisco February 23d of the above year, and went direct to the mines at Iowa Hill, where mining was followed for about four years. From this time until 1856 he was engaged in prospecting in different localities. In November, 1856, he came to Lake County, and engaged in the stock business in the upper end of the county. In September, 1865, he returned East, where he remained until the fall of 1867, when he returned and settled on his present place, consisting of fifty-seven acres, located a short distance above Upper Lake. Mr. Tallman married, September 1, 1861, Miss Mary E. Moore, a native of Missouri. Their children are, Grace I., William W., Berdenia M., George T., Mary E., Fred L., Walter R. and Winnie F.



TAYLOR, Rev. D. T.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg 281-282

Was born in Missouri, December 26, 1829. Here he resided with his parents on a farm until twenty years of age, when he crossed the plains with an ox-team and arrived at Sacramento September 16, 1850. Like all who came at that early day, he engaged in mining, which he followed five years. We next find him in Petaluma, Sonoma County, where he followed the wood business for two years. He then returned, via Panama, to Missouri, where he prosecuted farming for fourteen months, after which he returned to California, arriving at San Francisco January 12, 1859. After attending school at Healdsburg, Sonoma County, for about eight months, he engaged in farming, which he followed until 1869. He then came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and ninety-three acres, located in Bachelor Valley, where he still continues to reside. Mr. Taylor was ordained, in 1863, as a Baptist minister, and has preached more or less ever since. He was married, March 3, 1861, to Miss Susan C. Jones, a native of Missouri. By this union they have seven living children: Margaret J., Caleb L., George N., Mary E., Jessie J., Alice R. and Charley; and have lost two: William S. and Minnie M.



THOMPSON, D. V.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Missouri, June 28, 1820. When about sixteen years of age he, with his father, made a trip to Florida where they remained about nine months. On returning to Missouri the subject of this sketch engaged in school-teaching, which he followed until 1839. He then spent two years clerking on different steamers plying between St. Louis and St. Joseph. The next year was spent in farming after which he engaged as clerk in a general merchandise store in St. Joseph, Missouri which he followed about eighteen months. In 1844 he was elected Sheriff of Buchanan County, Missouri, which office he filled to the full satisfaction of the people. About July 1, 1846, he joined Company "H," Donovans's Regiment and went to Mexico, where he served as a private for one year. He then returned to Missouri and engaged in merchandising in Holt County until the spring of 1849, when he sold out and crossed the plains to California.
He left Missouri May 1, 1849 and arrived at Lassens Ranch October 14th of the above year, making the trip with ox-teams. Like all who arrived in the days of '49 he engaged at once in mining, which he followed, in the northern part of this State and in Oregon, until November, 1853, when he sailed via Nicaragua for the land of his birth, where he arrived January 8, 1854. Here he remained until the following spring, when he again crossed the plains, this time bringing a drove of cattle. He arrived in Contra Costa County in September of the above year, where he remained until December 1856, when he moved to Solano County and located near Vacaville. Here he followed stock raising in connection with farming until November 1863, when he came to Lake County and located where he now resides, about one-half mile south from Upper Lake. Here he owns about two hundred acres of land and is engaged in farming. Mr. Thompson has held the office of Justice of the Peace for the past eight years. He married in October, 1856, Miss Martha C. Powell, a native of Missouri. Their children are: Bettie, William A., Jeff L., and Minnie R.

p. 65 - Coyote Valley. "In the spring of 1855 Lansing T. Musick and Joseph Willard came in and settled, the former on the east side of Clover Creek and the latter on the west side. C. C. Rice now owns the Musick place and D. V. Thompson the Willard place.

p. 118 - D. V. Thompson was Supervisor of the Third Distric of Lake County for 1868-9.

p. 120 - D. V. Thompson was Justice of the Peace for Upper Lake Township for the years 1875-1881.

p. 121 - On September 4, 1874, D. V. Thompson was appointed Justice for Upper Lake Township.

p. 176-177 - FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS - Harley Lodge, No. 199, F. and A.M. of Lakeport, was organized U. D. April 27, 1869 with the following charter members...D. V. Thompson. The charter was granted October 14. 1869 and the first officers under th charter were...D. V. Thompson.

p. 178-179 - FARMERS SAVINGS BANK. This bank was incorporated December 14, 1874 and the time of incorportion is for a term of fifty years. ...The incorporating directors were...D. V. Thompson. At the election of 1878 the following officers were chosen...D. V. Thompson. In 1880 the same officers were elected.

Contributed by Margie Hinton


THOMPSON, S.A.


Excerpts from "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in North Carolina, December 20, 1852. When but a child his parents crossed the plains to California, and settled at Folsom, Sacramento County. In 1863 they came to Lake County and after a residence of about two years at Lower Lake moved to Big Valley. In 1871 the subject of this sketch went to Cloverdale, and after a short residence there went to Sacramento, where he worked in a machine shop for about two years. He then returned to lake County, and after filling the position of engineer at Bogg's mill for three years, he took up his residence at Rice's mill, where he fills the same position. Mr. Thompson married December 18, 1876, Miss A. Benton, a native of California and they have two children: Carrie M. and Emma L.




THORNTON, P. H., MD


Excerpts from "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 278-279

Was born in Tennessee, fifty miles east of Memphis, January 13, 1836. He received his education at Chalmers Institute, in Mississippi, graduating in 1852. In 1853 he commenced the study of medicine in Louisville, Kentucky, where he graduated in 1856, and in 1857 commenced the practice of medicine near Memphis, Tennessee, which he continued until 1861, when he joined the army, serving as medical inspector and surgeon under General Hardee until the retreat from Tollaheoma, Tennessee; then under Lieutenant-General Wheeler as chief surgeon to all the infantry, until the surrender of Lee. He then returned to Memphis and engaged in the commission business for one year. Then practiced medicine until the fall of 1873, when he was compelled to retire from practice on account of failing health. In 1875 he came to California, and, after a residence of about four months in San Jose, he came to Lake County and located at Lakeport, where he is at present engaged in the practice of his profession. Dr. Thornton married, January 13, 1869, Miss Bell J. Dockery, a native of Columbia, Tennessee. They have two living children: Mary H. and Bruce P.; and have lost two: Percy and Glover.



THURBER, Richard P.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 281

Was born at Saratoga Springs, New York, May 17, 1823. When he was seventeen years of age, he engaged as apprentice to the carpenter's trade, which he followed until 1856, when he engaged in merchandising. This business he followed about five years, when he closed out and went to Michigan. Here he followed carpentering for about twelve years. In the fall of 1880 he came to California, since which time he has been a resident of Lake County, and is engaged in the lumber business at Rice's mill.



TRAVIS, William


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 282-283

Was born in Putnam County, New York, November 6, 1826. At the age of nineteen he learned the bricklaying and plasterer's trade, and followed it until 1849, when he came to California via Cape Horn, arriving in San Francisco about the middle of September. He proceeded to the mines at Hangtown, and engaged in that business till the spring of 1850, when he went to one of the forks of the American River, where, in company with Colonel William Hagan, he prosecuted mining till fall. He then went to Nevada County and mined for two months. During the summer of 1851 he and Colonel Hagan cut hay at the sink of Putah Creek, which they lost by floods. He then went to Sonoma County and settled about one and a half miles from Santa Rosa, where a year was spent. He then moved to Vallejo Township, that county, where he lived till 1856. In 1852 he, with Colonel Hagan, returned East via Nicaragua, and purchased a drove of cattle, which they brought across the plains in 1853. In 1856 Mr. Travis located at Mark West Creek, and discovered the hot springs there. In the fall of 1858 he went to Mendocino County and remained till the fall of 1859, when he sold his cattle, and went to Petaluma and purchased an interest in a livery stable. In 1860 he went to Nevada and engaged in mining until 1864, when he returned to California and spent two years in dealing in stock in Sonoma County. In 1866 he settled in Pope Valley, Napa County, where he farmed till 1869. He then moved to Napa City and spent a year. In 1871 he came to Lake County and located in Long Valley, where he has since resided, being engaged in farming and stock raising. In 1855 he took a drove of horses from California to Illinois, and disposed of them in 1856.



TREMPER, L. B.


Excerpts from "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 279-280

Was born in Niagara County, New York, January 24, 1825. Here he resided with his parents on a farm until 1844, when the family moved to Lake County, Indiana. Here the father engaged in farming, and the boy worked at farming, milling and blacksmithing until late in 1849, when he went to Galena, Illinois. Here he joined a party of five others, and in the spring of 1850 they started across the plains, bound for California. They came with horse-teams, and arrived in El Dorado County July 31st of that year. Here he engaged in blacksmithing until September 1st, when he sold out his shop and tried his luck at mining. He followed it for four months, and when he "cleaned up" found that he had made $35! He says that the "diggings" were good enough, but he did not understand how to work them. He then engaged as boss of a gang of hands to conduct a "Long Tom" for $2 per day, which he followed for one month. He then helped to construct the first quartz mill ever put up in California, it being located at Mathews Creek, El Dorado County. In the fall of 1851 he was working at getting out timber at $8 per day, when he met with a serious accident - the cutting of his knee - which laid him up for fourteen months, and from the effects of which he has suffered to this day. In the fall of 1852 he opened a blacksmith shop in El Dorado County, where he remained about three months. He then again engaged in mining until the spring of 1854. He then went to Shasta County, and from there to Arcata, and then back to Weaverville, where he was sick with the chills. He then mined a little while, and then went to Tehama and bought a ranch in partnership with two others. At the end of four months he sold out to his partners, and returned to El Dorado County and engaged in mining until 1858. He then went to Napa County and opened a blacksmith shop, which he ran until the fall of 1859. He then went to Sa Jose and worked at his trade for about three months. He then, in the spring of 1860, came to Lake County and opened a blacksmith shop in Coyote Valley, where he worked until the spring of 1861. He then came to Lower Lake and opened a shop, which he ran for seventeen years; since which time he has been engaged in farming. He has one hundred and sixty acres where he resides, in the environs of the town of Lower Lake, and one hundred and sixty acres about five miles above that town. In 1872 he paid a visit to Indiana, being gone about four months. Married, May 23, 1863, Miss Matilda Slater, a native of Illinois. They have five living children: William G., Christopher, Diantha, Nellie and Julia; and have lost one, Henry.



TUCKER, George


Excerpts from "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Kentucky, April 3, 1812. His father was a farmer and George lived with him until his death. At the age of fourteen he commenced work in a distillery, which he followed for about eight years. He then engaged in farming for about three years, and then returned to his former occupation, which he followed for about eight years. He then again turned his attention to farming for about three years and then again resumed the business of distilling, which he followed for about two years. He then went to Missouri and engaged in farming until 1859, when he crossed the plains with ox teams, arriving in the Sacramento Valley September 15th of that year. He spent about two months in Butte County, and then went to Coloma County and followed farming for one season.
In September 1860 he came to Lake County and settled in Scotts Valley where he engaged in farming until 1864. In November of that year he settled about one mile south of Lakeport, where he has since resided.
Since his residence in Lake County he has filled the position of County Surveyor for three terms, and has held the position of Deputy United States Surveyor and Deputy County Surveyor for several years. Mr. Tucker was married in July 1835 to Miss Eliza Tomlinson, who died in August 1841 leaving two children, Jeremiah and Laura A.; the former is now deceased. He married secondly, in June 1847, Miss Joan Yager, who died in the spring of 1856 leaving five living children: John W., Mordecai, Benjamin F., George R., and Frederick N.; and they have lost George R. and Frederick N. in California. In June 1856, he united in marriage for the third time with Mrs. Martha C. Shirley, and they have one living child, Joseph M., now a resident of Washington Territory.

Contributed by Margie Hinton


TURNER, William


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 278

Is a native of Oxfordshire, England, born October 17, 1829. At the age of twenty-three years old he left his native country and, coming to America, settled in Ohio. January 6, 1853, he married Miss Harriett C. Smith, a native of Chardon, Geauga County, Ohio, by whom he has two living children: Emma C. and William H.; they lost two: Ella and Laura. William Turner followed farming until the breaking out of the Civil War, when he enlisted and served about one year, when, on account of wounds received at Perryville, Kentucky, he was discharged. We next find him merchandising in Chardon, Ohio, where he remained until 1870, when, on account of poor health, he moved to Cuba, Missouri. Here he followed the hotel business for seven years. His next move was to California, arriving here in January, 1877. He settled in San Jose, and engaged in the dairy business, which he followed until 1879, when he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of eighty acres, located in Scotts Valley.



"V"

VANN, P. W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 283

Was born in Illinois, August 12, 1819. In 1824, his parents moved to Sumner County, Tennessee, where they resided for six years, and in 1830, they moved to Cooper County, Missouri, and in 1836, to Polk County, that State. In 1839, they moved to Newton County, and in 1846 they moved to Greene County. In 1852 the subject of this sketch crossed the plains to California, arriving in Napa Valley October 25th of the above year. Here he resided until the fall of 1853, when he moved to Sonoma County and settled eight miles above Healdsburg, where he followed farming seven years. He then moved to Potter Valley, Mendocino County, where he followed farming about ten years; then moved to Point Arena, where he spent one year, and then moved to Ukiah, where he resided about one year. We next find Mr. Vann on a cattle ranch in the Eel River country, where he remained one year. He then, in July, 1874, came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of forty acres, located about one and one-half miles from Upper Lake. He married, August 14, 1839, Miss Spicy E. Davison. They have six children: Joel W., William, Sarah E., Martin B., Thomas E. and Alice. They have lost six: John W., Mary J., Ellen M., Martha A., Robert L. and Minnie.



"W"

WALDFOGEL, Martin


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 285-286

Is a native of Switzerland, and was born September 15, 1835. When about eighteen years of age he went to France, where he spent about fifteen months, and then came to New York. After visiting New York, Pennsylvania, and Indianapolis, he settled in St. Louis, where he remained about fifteen months. He then went to New Orleans, and shipped for California. Crossing the Isthmus of Panama, he arrived at San Francisco in the spring of 1855. Mr. Waldfogel went at once to Marysville, where he remained about four months; then went to the mines, where he followed mining until the spring of 1857, when he came to Lake County and located in Long Valley, where he resided about twelve years, and then settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred acres, located about three miles from Upper Lake, on the road to Bartlett Springs. He married, in August, 1871, Miss Emma Hoffner, who died in October, 1873. He married, secondly, June 13, 1877, Miss Caroline Gerr, a native of Prussia.



WALLEN, Ezra


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 285

Was born in Jefferson County, New York, February 16, 1832. Here he resided on a farm until he was nineteen years of age, when he crossed the plains to California. The first fourteen years of California life were spent in the mines. He then went to San Francisco, and served nineteen months as a California volunteer. We next find Mr. Wallen in Sonoma County, where farming was prosecuted for four years. In July, 1870, he came to Lake County, and located on his present place, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, situated about two miles from Rice's mill, where he is engaged in growing vegetables and fruit. Mr. Wallen married, March 26, 1865, Mrs. Harriet M. Johnson, a native of Ohio, by whom he has six children: Adda, David M., George R., Marchie, Charlotte and Mabel.



WALLS, Benjamin


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 286-287

Was born in Maine, May 31, 1829. When thirteen years of age he took to the sea, which life he followed for about two years. He then returned to Maine and engaged as apprentice to the carriage-making trade, which he followed three years, and the three years following were spent on the sea. In 1852 he rounded Cape Horn and arrived at San Francisco August 13th of that year. After spending about two months in the Bay City, he went to the mines, where he remained but a short time, and returned to Vallejo and secured a situation in the Navy Yard at Mare Island. Here he remained the succeeding twelve years, and then engaged in farming a short distance from Vallejo, Solano County, which he followed for about six years. We next find Mr. Walls residing in Vallejo, where he built a schooner, which he ran for about two years. In April, 1873, he came to Lake County, and engaged in hotel-keeping at Lower Lake, which business he has since followed. He has also a drug store a short distance from his hotel, which has been conducted by his daughter, Mary D., for the last three years. He was united in marriage, April 27, 1860, to Miss Ellen L. Holiban. By this marriage they have five living children: Effa E., Mary D., Benicia, Frisbie and Benjamin; and have lost two: Evalena and Ellen D.



WELCH, Hon. S. K.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 283-284

The subject of this sketch was born in Montgomery County, Kentucky, August 30, 1829, where he resided until he was about twenty-one years of age. He then moved to Missouri, where he studied law, and was, in due course of time, admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of that State. In 1862 he came to California, and to Lake County in June, 1865, where he has since continuously resided. From March, 1868, till March, 1872, two terms, he held the office of District Attorney of Lake County. He was a member of the Legislature of 1873-4, representing Napa and Lake Counties jointly. He was again elected to that position in 1877-8 by the people of Lake County alone, it being then entitled to a representative. When Mr. Welch came to Lake County he found all the better portion of it claimed by the claimants to a grant, which it was declared had been ceded to their predecessors by the Mexican Government. Soon after his arrival he was employed by the settlers to take charge of their interests, and to render the United States District Attorney all possible assistance in defeating the claimants. Upon investigation he found the case pending in the United States District Court at San Francisco, where it had been slumbering for some years, after having been sent back to that Court for a new trial by the Supreme Court of the United States, upon a reversal of judgment in favor of the claimants. He succeeded in getting the case docketed and noticed for trial. The trial came up in September, 1866, at which the claimants were defeated, and in consequence thereof the settlers got their lands, which even at that time were considerably improved and quite valuable. The full history of this transaction will be found in the body of the work to which the reader is referred.



WHITE, R. P.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 285

Is a native of Barren County, Kentucky, and was born January 5, 1822. When but a child, his parents moved to Gibson County, Tennessee, where they settled on a farm. In 1852 the subject of this sketch left his parents, and crossed the plains with ox-teams, arriving in Contra Costa County September 7, 1853. He settled in San Ramon Valley, where farming was prosecuted until November, 1865, when he came to Lake County and settled on his present place, consisting of two hundred and thirty-two acres, located in Bachelor Valley, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. White was Road Commissioner during the years 1876-7, and served as Deputy Assessor in 1880. He married, January 15, 1845, Miss Malinda Gilliland, a native of Tennessee. By this union they have seven living children: Emma P., Gustavus H., Susan M., Melcenia T., Alice A., Cheney P. and Olive J.; and have lost one, Casander A.



WHITING, Elisha


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 287

Was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, June 25, 1811. Here he resided until 1832, receiving his education in the meantime. In the last named year he engaged in running a packet plying between Plymouth and Boston, which he continued for two years. He then engaged in merchandising for one year. His next move was to Missouri, where he was mate on the steamboat "Rienzi," after which he engaged in the tobacco business and merchandising, which he followed until 1839. He then returned to Plymouth, where he engaged for the next ten years in a shop where iron axles, crowbars, etc., were made. In March, 1849, he started for California on board the ship "Sweden," Captain Cotting, and coming around the Horn, he arrived in San Francisco August 3d of that year. He proceeded at once to the mines, where he engaged in mining for about one year. He then built a hotel on the road from Sacramento to Hangtown (Placerville), which he conducted for one year. He then disposed of this property and returned to the mines, and followed that occupation for two years at Union Bar, Yuba River. In the winter of 1852 he went to Butte County and built a hotel, four miles from Rabbit Creek, which he conducted till 1859. He then came to Napa City, where one year was spent. He then went to Vallejo, where he took charge of the telegraph office for seven years. In 1871 he came to Lake County and settled seven miles below Kelseyville, where he conducted a saw-mill until 1874. He then moved to Middletown and took charge of the telegraph and post-offices until 1877, since which time he has been engaged in merchandising in Middletown. Mr. Whiting was married at Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1833, to Miss Almira Holmes, a native of that place. They have four living children: Abbie I., Fannie, Mary E. and Elisha F., and have lost two: Caroline A. and Joseph B.



WILLIAMS, David


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 284

Son of Stephen H. and Phoebe Ann Williams, second of a family of eight children, was born July 31, 1845, in New York City. In 1850 his father came to California, first removing his family, David being then five years old, to Caldwell, New Jersey. In 1852 his family joined him in San Francisco, Mrs. Williams and the children sailing from New York harbor in May, and reaching San Francisco, by way of Cape Horn, in the September following. For many years and up to the time of his death in June, 1880, Mr. Williams' father was in business as an architect in San Francisco. Mr. Williams' education was acquired mainly in the public schools, though he spent one year in the City College, Rev. George Burrowes, D.D., Principal. Before the completion of his school studies he was employed for six months in an intelligence office. After leaving school he was a clerk for three years in a hat store. In 1865 he received a position in the City and County Surveyor's office, where he remained for eight years, devoting most of his time to field work. Not possessing a robust constitution, in 1873 his health failed. After spending a month in Lake County, with decided benefit, he returned to San Francisco, but was unable to continue work. After trying Los Angeles for a time, without benefit, he returned to Lake County, and made his home at Kelseyville, clerking for some time in the store of W. G. Young. March 5, 1876, he was married to Miss Mary E. Piner, daughter of Mr. Charles A. Piner of Kelseyville. Their union has been blessed with two children: one, Angelina M., has died; the other, Howard Piner, is living. In the fall of 1877 Mr. Williams was elected County Treasurer, and in March, 1878, he moved to Lakeport to take charge of the office, a position which he still holds. The public appreciation of his integrity of character, urbanity of manner, and fidelity as an officer, were shown by his re-election in 1879 by a handsome majority over all competitors.



WILLIAMS, Richard


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 285

The subject of this sketch, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Wales, January 23, 1834, and resided in his native country till he was twelve years of age. In 1851 he came to California and began the brewing business in Comptonville, Yuba County in connection with which he conducted a hotel. In 1867 he came to and took charge of the Harbin Springs, and purchased the property, which he still conducts. He was married, September 17, 1859, to Miss Mary Jones, a native of Wales, born May 22, 1834, and died September 18, 1866. Their children are, William R., born August 14, 1860; Margaret, born October 5, 1862; Mary A., born August 28, 1866, and died October 26, 1866. He was married, secondly, in 1872, to Mrs. Anna Patton, and by this union has one child, Richard, born May 29, 1875.



WILSON, George W.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 287-288

Is the younger of two brothers, and was born July 19, 1847, in Washington County, Ohio, about seven miles from Matamoras, on the Ohio River. When he was three years old his father was killed by a falling tree, and one year later his mother died, leaving his brother and himself as orphans, the brother six and he but four years old. They were taken to their grandfather Wilson's, in Guernsey County, Ohio, where they found kind friends who ministered to their every want, and where George resided until 1874. He received the rudiments of his education in the public schools in his district, and afterwards attended select schools in Fairview and Barnesville. He also attended Miami Commercial College, in Dayton, Ohio, for eight or nine weeks, his principal instructor and warm friend being Prof. James Vinsonhaler, who died in San Jose a few years ago, and Kenyon Grammar School two terms. He received his first teacher's certificate when he was fifteen years of age, and taught his first school when but sixteen years old. In this school he taught three terms in succession, and continued to teach in winter and work upon the farm in summer, except while attending school, until 1874, when he moved to California. In his last school in Ohio he taught for four years. In the winter of 1873-4 he was married to Lucy E., eldest daughter of Robert Y. Price, a well-to-do farmer of Belmont County, Ohio, and September 1, 1874, came to California. During the nine years he taught in Ohio he boarded away from home but one term, having taught within two miles of home during the rest of the time. The winter of 1874-5 was spent in Lakeport, principally with J. W. Mackall, who was then in the drug business, part of the time after Christmas having been spent in the offices of Sheriff Ingram and County Clerk W. Mathews, and in teaching with Professor Cooper. February 22, 1875, he moved to Upper Lake and took charge of the school at that place, in which position he remained two years. He then left Upper Lake on account of the ill health of his wife, and moved to Lakeport, where he spent the winter in the office of County Clerk H. A. Oliver, who honored him with the appointment of Deputy Clerk, which position he held for about one year, when he resigned. Mr. Shirley, his successor at Upper Lake, having resigned, he was recalled to the school, where he remained another year. The winter of 1877-8 was spent in San Francisco. At this time he was chosen Principal of the Lakeport Public School. In May, 1878, Lakeport Lodge, No. 34, A.O.U.W., was organized, and he was chosen Recorder, and continued to hold that position until June, 1881, when he resigned, in order to visit his old home. IN 1880 he was appointed a member of the Board of Education for Lake County.



WILSON, H. H.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 286

Was born in Indiana, November 17, 1831. When quite a young man he engaged as an apprentice to the blacksmith trade, which he followed in Indiana until the fall of 1852, when he went to Iowa. Here he followed the same occupation seven years, and then engaged in farming until the spring of 1864, when he crossed the plains to Nevada, where he prosecuted his trade for two years. We next find Mr. Wilson in Healdsburg, Sonoma County, California, where he remained until the fall of 1867, when he took up his residence in Lower Lake, Lake County, and opened a shop which he conducted until 1878, when he leased his establishment and moved upon a farm about one mile west from that town, where he at present resides. Mr. Wilson married, August 2, 1855, Miss Mary Henkle, a native of Illinois. By this marriage they have five living children: Florence V., Laura E., Katie A., Orville H. and William W.; and have lost one, Frank.



WOODS, James Lorimer


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 288-289

The son of Rev. James and Eliza Ann Woods, was born in Madison, Florida, October 19, 1846. He is the third of a family of eight. He is a pioneer, having come to California with his father's family in 1849. His home for many years was in Sonoma County, where he received his education and made his start in life. For two years, in his turn, he was farmer upon his father's place, then received his academical education at Healdsburg; and at eighteen past began life with teaching district school. He studied law with his maternal uncle, Colonel S. W. Williams, of the law firm of Clark, Williams & Martin, of Little Rock, Arkansas. In the spring of 1868, in his twenty-second year, he was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of Arkansas, and to the United States Circuit Court of the Eastern District of Arkansas. In the winter of 1869 he was admitted in the Supreme Court of California, and in the United States Circuit Court, District of California. Having opened an office in San Francisco, he was forced to relinquish the practice on account of threatened pulmonary affections, caused by the coast climate. Upon restoration to his health, his convictions of duty were changed, and he began the study of theology. Upon the organization of the San Francisco Theological Seminary of the Presbyterian Church, in 1871, he entered it for the completion of his course of study, and was its first enrolled student. He was married Sept. 17, 1872, to Miss Susan T. Bradley, of Sonoma County, and in December of the same year removed to Lake County. In the spring of 1873, he was regularly ordained as a Presbyterian minister. With some interruption he labored for five years in Lake County. The churches at Kelseyville and Upper Lake were secured during his ministry. The organization of the Second Presbyterian Church of Clear Lake was effected through his instrumentality. Having been compelled to cease his labors through ill health in the fall of 1878, he, after a year's rest, accepted a call for six months to the Presbyterian Church of Dixon. His old troubles returned in a worse form, suffering an attack of hemorrhage of the lungs. In May, 1880, he returned to Lakeport with the conviction of being physically unable for the future work of the ministry, and satisfied that the salubrious climate of Lake County, if any, would prolong his life and usefulness. In the latter part of June he enrolled his name as an attorney in the Superior Court, and is now engaged in the practice of law.



"Y"

YATES, Ira G.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 289-290

Was born in Lee County, Virginia, March 15, 1821. In 1825 his parents moved to Missouri. Here young Ira grew up on a farm and in 1855 went to Kansas, taking with him his wife and four children, which at this time constituted his family. In Kansas, farming was prosecuted until 1864, when he moved to Montana, where mining was followed in connection with keeping hotel, until 1866, when he returned to Missouri. Here Mr. Yates once more engaged in farming, which he followed until 1870, when he came to California and located at Lower Lake, Lake County, where he has since resided. For the past seven years he has held the office of Constable of Lower Lake Township and Deputy Sheriff two years. He was married, May 25, 1842, to Miss Johanna Shepherd, and the fruits of this union are six living children: Owen C., Rebecca J., Enoch, Levina A., Susie and Sallie. They have lost three: William, James K. P. and Elizabeth.



YOUNG, C. M.


From "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

YOUNG, C. M. Whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Menard County, Illinois, March 8, 1841, his parents dying when he was but a boy. He lived with his grandfather until he was seventeen years of age, when he commended farming for himself. Left for California in April 1863, with horse teams and went to Sonoma County. There he resided until January 1867, and then moved to Coyote Valley, Lake County. He lived there four years, and then moved to Loconoma Valley, near Middletown. Lived there one year and then moved to Middletown where he bought a half interest in the place. Here he started in the hotel and livery business, in which he is still engaged. Mr. Young married Miss Lutita Berry, November 20, 1856. They have three boys: Wirt H., Baxter E. and Charles W.




YOUNG, E. R.


Excerpts from "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881 - Pg. 290

Was born in Maine, January 5, 1828. Here he followed farming until 1853, when he came via Panama to California, arriving at San Francisco, November 17th of the above year. He went at once to Auburn, Placer County, where he followed mining, farming and teaming, until 1858, when he came to Lake County and followed farming in Bachelor Valley, until the fall of 1864, when he went to Humboldt County and spent the winter. Returning to Lake County in the spring of 1865, he settled on his present place, consisting of one hundred and sixty-one acres, located at the head of Blue Lake Valley. Here he is engaged in farming. Mr. Young married, October 15, 1873, Miss Dollie M. Green, a native of Maine.



YOUNG, L.A.


Excerpts from "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

L. A. Young was born in Kentucky, July 23, 1835. In 1842 the family moved to Texas, where they resided until 1844, when they returned to Kentucky. In 1850 the subject of this sketch, his brother Pembrooke S. and their father crossed the plains to California, and arrived at Frenchmans Bar on the South Yuba September 13th of the above year. They engaged at once in mining, which they followed about six months, after which they followed different occupations until 1853, when they commenced farming in Sacramento County. This occupation they followed in Sacramento one season; and in October 1854, they came to Lake County, and, after spending about two months in Big Valley, settled at Upper Lake, where they pursued farming and stock raising until 1856, when they took up their abode in Big Valley. Here the father died May 22, 1872. The subject of this sketch settled on his present place, consisting of sixty five acres, in 1873.
Mr. Young married, December 26, 1864, Miss California M. Thompson, a native of Missouri. Their children are: Annie, Frank, Alma, Walter and Bettie.




YOUNG, W. G.


Excerpts from "History of Napa and Lake Counties" 1881

Was born in Richland County, Ohio, August 6, 1835. His father died when he was six years of age, and the young boy had very soon to assume the duties of superintendent of the farm. He remained at his birth place until 1857, when he went to Illinois, where he followed teaching until the spring of 1862. He then made a trip to Pike's Peak and returned in the fall. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company "H," 27th Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served about eleven months, when he was wounded, and in consequence received his discharge. He then went to Ohio, where he remained one year. He then went to Randolph County, Illinois, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits, which he followed until 1873, when he disposed of his interests. In 1875 he came to California and located in Kelseyville, where he engaged in merchandising, which he followed until May, 1880, when he disposed of his business to Messrs. Clendenin Brothers. Since then he has been engaged in farming and wood growing. He owns about four hundred acres of land, located in Big Valley, near Kelseyville. He was married, October 25, 1866, to Miss Alice O. Tuthill, a native of Illinois. They have three living children: Orrie E., Willard T., and Charles. They have lost two: Etta A. and Zoe.



YOUNG, W. G.

"Pioneer Families", The Young family - Pioneers in Lake Co.- Go to this page to read the article.



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