Monterey County California Genealogy and History

Monterey County: Biographies



I. F. HAUBNER

I. F. Haubner is the proprietor of the well kept Cream Bakery, at 336 Pacific Avenue, Santa Cruz. He was born in Bohemia, February 1, 1870, and at the age of fifteen, began to learn the baker's trade. There years later, in 1888, he crossed the broad Atlantic to America, and made his way to Rochester, New York, where for a while he worked in a bakery. He was then in business for himself at Watkins, New York, conducting an excellent shop there from 1894 until 1904.

In the latter year Mr. Haubner came to California, settling in San Joaquin county, and at Stockton he worked in the John Ingalls bakery for four years or until 1908. He was next a partner with Mr. Ratto in the Grand Central Bakery and in 1912 he bought out his partner, after which he established the Cream Bakery, with first-class bakery goods and a line of choice groceries. The high standard early set by Mr. Haubner as being the probable goal of the majority of his patrons he has never lowered. He is widely known for the excellence of his products and his business methods commend him to the patronage of the public.

Mr. Haubner married Miss Edith Williams, a native of Ithaca, New York, and their happy union has brought them four loving children-Josephine Grace and Alois, born in New York, and Margaret and Edith, born in California. They also had the misfortune to lose one daughter, Stella, who died in 1922, at the age of twenty-one years. Mr. Haubner was made an American citizen at Watkins, New York, in 1894, and in this acquired citizenship he has since gloried. He is a member of the Loyal Order of Moose, and, it is fair to assume, among the most welcome in their lodge.

Source: History of Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties, California : cradle of California's history and romance : dating from the planting of the cross of Christendom upon the shores of Monterey Bay by Fr. Junipero Serra, and those intrepid adventurers who accompanied him, down to the present day. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1925, 890 pgs.