Monterey County California Genealogy and History

Monterey County: Biographies



FRED RUHL

Among the well known building contractors in Monterey county there is perhaps none who has established for himself a higher reputation for the general excellence and artistic character of his work than has Fred Ruhl, who has been engaged in contracting in Pebble Beach for the past ten years and more, and who during that time has directed the construction of some of the most notable of the attractive residences that adorn the streets of that popular seaside resort, among these being the McComber home, the Pebble Beach lodge, the McNaughton home and the McKensie home.

Fred Ruhl was born on a farm in the state of Illinois, in 1876, and is a son of Jesse and Harriet Ruhl, substantial residents of the community in which they lived. Jesse Ruhl was the son of a carpenter and was himself well trained in that craft, but he preferred farming as a vocation and became a well-to-do farmer and landowner. Reared on the farm, Fred Ruhl acquired his education in the local schools and early took up the trade of carpenter, in which he was well trained, and in due time became competent to contract jobs on his own account. In 1903 he came to California and worked at his trade in various places in this state until 1916, when he established his home in Pebble Beach and set up there as a building contractor. His success from the start was assured and he has done well in this line, now being one of the well established contractors of the county.

Mr. Ruhl was united in marriage to Miss Alma Warren and he and his wife have a very pleasant home on the beach. Mr. Ruhl is a member of the Masonic order and is a past Noble Grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Source: History of Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties, California : cradle of California's history and romance : dating from the planting of the cross of Christendom upon the shores of Monterey Bay by Fr. Junipero Serra, and those intrepid adventurers who accompanied him, down to the present day. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1925, 890 pgs.