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Boren, Lewis Archer 1957-1981 shark attack

 
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Mary S Taylor



Joined: 27 Nov 2007
Posts: 22306
Location: Fresno, CA

PostPosted: Fri May 09, 2008 6:52 am    Post subject: Boren, Lewis Archer 1957-1981 shark attack Reply with quote

Monterey Peninsula Herald, CA Dec. 22, 1981 p2
P.G. Surfer Feared Killed by Shark
By Ken Peterson / Herald Staff Writer
Authorities are searching for a 25-year-old Pacific Grove man who may have been attacked and killed by a shark while surfing Saturday off Spanish Bay in Pebble Beach. If the incident is confirmed it would mark the eighth shark attack and only the second fatal attack in local waters since record-keeping began in 1926. Lewis A. Boren, of 329 Eardley St., was reported missing at 11:40 a.m. Monday by a friend who said he last saw Boren surfing off Spanish Bay in Pebble Beach Saturday at 2 p.m. Boren’s yellow surfboard and a separate 14-inch section apparently bitten out by a large shark were recovered at Asilomar State Beach by a surfer at 11 a.m. Monday. Triangular Marks. The semi-circular section and the board itself show the regular, triangular marks which indicate a shark bite, according to librarian Alan Baldridge of Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove. “Obviously it was the work of a large shark,” he said. Shark expert Daniel Miller, with the state Department of Fish and Game in Monterey, was hoping to examine the board today to determine if the section was bitten out by a white shark. He said he or another expert could determine the size and species of shark if even a fragment of a tooth is imbedded in the board. The board apparently is bloodstained, according to state parks ranger S.D. Rodriguez of Asilomar, who said the stains will be analyzed during the investigation. David Jarman of Carmel reported Boren missing to both the Monterey County Sheriff’s office and Pebble Beach security forces Monday at 11:40 a.m. after Boren failed to show up for work at Terra Engineering Co. Inc. in Monterey. Identified by Friends. Independently, Boren’s board was found at Asilomar by a Salinas surfer. It was later identified by friends of Boren as the missing man’s board. Boren, a former resident of the Los Angeles area who surfed regularly in the area, according to Rodriguez, is described as 6-foot-2, 180 pounds, brown hair and eyes, with a seagull tattoo on one upper arm. He was wearing a black wetsuit when he was last seen. The DFG’s Miller recently co-authored a paper on shark attacks in California and Oregon which tallies 49 unprovoked incidents from 1926 until the present. Only four of the incidents were fatal. The only fatality recorded in waters from Monterey Bay south to Point Sur was in December 1952 when Barry Wilson of Pacific Grove was killed while swimming off Lovers Point. On increase. Miller said shark attacks are apparently on the increase, particularly in the colder waters north of Point Conception. The last recorded attack was in the Trinidad area of Humboldt County in 1980, he said. Miller said most attacks are on skin and scuba divers, with the last attack on a surfer in 1977. He said he believes there are “more sharks because there are a lot more marine mammals, their primary food.” Sharks, including the so-called “maneating” white sharks, have been observed and caught regularly in Monterey Bay for the past 30 years. Most recently, Department of Fish and Game biologists put out a white shark advisory for the local area at the end of October. An increase in the number of otters killed by white sharks pointed to an upsurge in their numbers in local waters and prompted the warning. Very Dumb. Miller said sharks will often attack even inanimate objects to find out if they are edible. Basically, he said, they are “very, very dumb animals. They will bit at anything.” Miller said for scuba divers, the safest areas are in kelp beds. He said there are no recorded incidents where a shark attacked a human in a kelp forest. He said virtually all shark attacks in California and Oregon have occurred north of Point Conception, most particularly between Ano Nuevo Island in San Mateo County and Bodega Bay in Sonoma County.
Copyright (c) 2008 The Monterey County Herald

Monterey Peninsula Herald, CA Dec. 22, 1981 p3
Seven Attacks in Area Since 1926
There are seven recorded incidents of humans being attacked by sharks from Monterey Bay south to Big Sur since 1926, only one of them fatal. The incidents follow in chronological order. – Dec. 7, 1952 – Barry Wilson, 17, of Pacific Grove, attacked and killed by a white shark at 2 p.m. while swimming off Lovers Point in Pacific Grove. Wilson was treading water in a 20- to 30- foot depth at the time. – Feb. 6, 1955 – James Jacobs, 19, of Santa Cruz, attacked by an unidentified shark at 9 a.m. while scuba diving off Pacific Grove. Jacobs was on the surface in a 20-foot depth, swimming slowly to shore with a fish he had speared. He received minor wounds to a foot, and lost the flipper and diving sock from the other foot. – May 19, 1960 – Suzanne Theriot, 19, of Watsonville, attacked while floating in an inner tupe at 1 p.m. at Hidden Beach near Aptos. She lost the lower half of a leg in the attack, which occurred in a depth of eight feit and probably involved a white shark. – Jan. 22, 1960 – Don Barthman, 29, of San Pablo, attacked at 10 a.m. while skin diving off Cypress Point. He was resting on the surface in a 60- to 65 foot depth when he was bitten on the arm and thigh and rammed in the ribcage, probably by a white shark. – Sept. 9, 1972 – Hans Kretschmer, 18, of Scotts Valley, attacked at 10 a.m. while surfing off Point Sur. He was resting on his board in a 30-foot depth when a white shark attacked, destroying the board and severely biting his legs. The attack was originally blamed on a killer whale, but tooth marks in his wetsuit were those of a shark. – Sept. 28, 1974 – Kirk Johnston, 17, of Salinas, attacked by a white shark at 7:20 a.m. while surfing off Point Sur. He was sitting on his board in a nine- to 10-ffot depth when the shark attacked from the side, injuring his thigh and lower abdomen and damaging the board. – Aug. 5, 1978 – P. Dunah, attacked while wading on the beach at Pajaro Dunes. He was in a five-foot depth when he felt a tug on his leg, and received minor cuts from what was apparently a small shark.
Copyright (c) 2008 The Monterey County Herald

Monterey Peninsula Herald, CA Dec. 23, 1981 p4
Comrades on Beach Eulogize Missing Surfer
“He was a surfer who could pick off waves on his 5-foot-4 knee board better than we could on our 7-footers,” said a surfer mourning the disappearance of Lewis Archer Boren, who may have been attacked by a great white shark, measuring 18 to 20 feet long. It was cold and windy last night on Asilomar State Beach as about two dozen surfers drank beer, stood around a bonfire and reminisced about Lew, their surfing buddy of the past five years. “I think Lew wouldn’t want us to get depressed and mourn,” said Jim Robertson of Carmel. “He’d want us to throw a wake.” And he would have wanted them to keep on surfing. Many vowed to be back on the waves when they were breaking right. They would keep surfing. Lovers Point, the Bone Yard, Spanish Bay and Asilomar. Just a few hundred feet away, Boren’s surfboard had been found. It was close to his favorite surfing area – the “middles” of Asilomar. His companions remembered him as “mellow” on land, never one to participate in the “rowdiness” of parties. One to seek for peace; and one who sought “friendship.” “He was but a single person against the many forces of the ocean,” said Gar Schaefer of Pacific Grove in a eulogy written on the day Boren’s surfboard was found with a shark-bitten hole in it. “Who knows why it happened?” Schaefer asked. “It could have been the ocean with its awesome and fearless power reclaiming one of her own children. Whatever the reason…Lew will be remembers by those who had the great fortune of having him for a friend.”
Copyright (c) 2008 The Monterey County Herald

Monterey Peninsula Herald, CA Dec. 23, 1981 p1,4
Giant Shark Attacked Surfboard, Says Scientist
By Kevin Howe / Herald Staff Writer
A surfboard that washed up on Asilomar State Beach Monday was definitely bitten by a great white shark, possibly the largest ever recorded on the West Coast, a state Department of Fish and Game scientist said Tuesday. Marine biologist Daniel J. Miller examined the board and said it bore tooth marks characteristic of the giant shark, which was depicted in the movie “Jaws” as a ferocious man-eater. “It was definitely a white shark, possibly the largest so far on this coast - very, very large,” said Miller, who estimated the shark’s size at between 18 ½ and 20 feet in length. Meanwhile, the man who had been using the surfboard, Lewis Archer Boren, 24, of 329 Eardley Ave., Pacific Grove, is still missing. State Park Ranger S.D. Rodriguez of Asilomar said he and another ranger walked the length of the beach between Point Arenas and Spanish Bay but found no sign of Boren. Boren was last seen Saturday about 2 p.m. His damaged board was found at Asilomar Sunday morning by two Salinas surfers. Boren’s pickup truck and camper, with personal items inside, were found Monday at Spanish Bay after he was reported missing Monday when he failed to show up for work. State park rangers on the Peninsula are now advising divers of the weekend shark attack, but no one is being told to stay out of the water, according to a ranger at Point Lobos State Reserve. A general shark warning was put out for the Monterey Bay area at the end of October because officials with the state Department of Fish and Game noticed an increase in the number of white sharks in local waters. Biologist Miller said he does not believe a stronger warning is needed now. The public has heard about the attack through news reports, and shark attacks are so infrequent and so unpredictable that no other advisory is necessary, he said. “If I were a diver, I wouldn’t go in the water, but that’s about all you can say,” he noted. If there should be another attack on man or animal within two to three weeks, he added, it would indicate that “this one (shark) is hanging around.” Miller said the damaged surfboard was apparently hit twice by the shark, grabbed, released, and then bitten through. He said the jaw size as indicated by the 18-inch bite taken out of the board means the attacking shark “has to be at least 18 ½ feet, possibly 20 feet.” He is taking the board to the California Academy of Science in San Francisco today to confer with experts there and make a determination of the exact size of the attacking animal. “The record white shark for the West Coast, he said, was one 18 ½ feet long caught off Santa Barbara. White sharks of up to 40 feet in length have been reported in other areas of the world. Stains on the fiber glass board believed to be blood were being examined by the county sheriff’s department. A result of the tests is expected sometime today, according to Sheriff’s Capt. Roger Chatterton. Miller is the author of an exhaustive study of unprovoked shark attacks occurring on the coasts of California and Oregon between 1926 and 1979. In all, 49 such attacks have been recorded since 1926, he said, and all of those that occurred north of Point Conception are believed to involve white sharks. His study indicates that a shark could mistake a surfer lying on his board with his arms and legs extended for an elephant or harbor seal, the primary food of white sharks, and could launch an attack on that basis. Not much is known about the behavior of the great white shark, Miller said, but it is believed to be a solitary hunter. In his study, 94 percent of the unprovoked attacks were made by solitary sharks – white sharks in colder northern waters and sharks more tolerant of warmer waters in most attacks south of Point Conception. White sharks are apparently “random feeders” that strike at targets of opportunity, he noted, and appear to be as likely to attack in clear waters as in turgid. Shark attacks have occurred against skindivers at all depths, as shallow as three feet and as deep as 120 feet. Nearly 80 percent of attacks on divers occurred on the surface. Miller said shark attacks are so rare that it is difficult to offer swimmers, divers or surfers any rules to go by. Most attacks occur during the summer months, but that is also the time of greatest swimming activity in the ocean. On the other hand, while Monterey County has the highest rate of skin diving activity in the state, only seven attacks on divers have been reported since 1926, while the greatest number of attacks occurred near Tomales Point and the Farallon Islands off San Francisco, where relatively little skin diving takes place. Among the 47 attacks reported in his monograph on the subject, 26 occurred against skin divers, 11 on swimmers, six on surfers and four on commercial abalone divers. Forty of them occurred north of Point Conception and seven south of that point. Of the 40 in northern waters, 21 were by white sharks and seven by unidentified species. He said the increase in incidents could be attributed to the increase in the number of pinnipeds, especially the elephant and harbor seals. California sea lions and sea otters, also objects of shark attacks, have also increased. Not all attacks are believed to be related to feeding. In some cases, sharks showed behavior characteristic of defending their territory. Another surfboard was found on the rocks at the southern end of Asilomar Beach Tuesday afternoon, but sheriff’s deputies said the board, which had been pounded by the surf, did nto appear to be connected to the shark attack.
Copyright (c) 2008 The Monterey County Herald

Monterey Peninsula Herald, CA Dec. 25, 1981 p2
Missing Since Saturday
Body of Surfer Found; Shark Attack Confirmed

The body of missing surfer Lewis Archer Boren of Pacific Grove was found floating in waist-deep water at the north end of Asilomar State Beach Thursday morning. An 18-inch-long chunk had been ripped from the body by what officials described as a great white shark at least 20 feet long and weighing two tons. Monterey County Deputy Coroner Paul Crossman identified the body as that of the man who had been missing since Saturday when he was last seen surfing off Spanish Bay in Pebble Beach, south of Asilomar. Boren, 24, was a welder at Terra Engineering Co. Inc. in Monterey. Crossman said state park Ranger Dusty Layton and a beach visitor, Richard Pimentel of Seaside, spotted the wetsuit-clad body about 11 a.m. Positive identification was made by a tattoo of a seagull on the victim’s upper left arm and by dental records. An autopsy was being conducted Thursday afternoon. Boren, who was a resident of the South Bay area of Los Angeles until he moved to Pacific Grove about five years ago, was a veteran surfer. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Boren of Torrance. Monterey County Sheriff’s Captain Roger Chatterton said that because the body had been immersed in sea water for several days, it was impossible to make an identification by examining facial features. Chatterton said the “massive amount of trauma” was consistent wit the bite of a large shark.” The conclusion that the cause of death was due to a shark bite was made by Bob Lee, a senior marine biologist with the state Department of Fish and Game, after an examination Thursday afternoon, Chatterton said. Chatterton said that it appeared Boren was the victim of “one bite or possibly two quick successive bits more consistent with a massive bite rather than gnawing or chewing.: The bite encompassed an 18-inch by 8-inch section of the body. The scenario of the shark attack, based on physical evidence, Chatterton said, was that Boren was lying on the surfboard, just beyond the breaker line, when the shark approached his left side and bit both his torso and the board at the same time. “It just about looks like one lunge by the shark,” Chatterton said. Boren’s surfboard was found Sunday morning at Asilomar with an 18-inch bite taken out of it. State Crime Laboratory officials in Salinas determined Thursday that bloodstains found on the board were not that of a human, Chatterton said. Lee said that the sharks have loose, spongy tissue around the gums and that as a result of a bite, bleeding is not uncommon. He said that the small amounts of blood found in the styrofoam of the surfboard were near the base of the tooth impressions left on the board. There were no results Thursday afternoon from test being conducted at the state Fish and Game laboratory in Sacramento, Lee said. But he said, the source of the blood was now secondary because of the discovery of the body. Chatterton explained that the “washing action of the ocean” probably took away any trace of human blood. The shark attack was only the second fatal attack in local waters and the eighth since record-keeping began in 1926. The last fatal shark attack in Monterey Bay was Dec. 7, 1952, when Barry Wilson, 17, of Pacific Grove was killed at 2 p.m. while swimming off Loves Point in Pacific Grove. Wilson was treading water in a 20- to 3—foot depth at the time. Daniel Miller of the Fish and Game office in Monterey said the shark which killed Boren was at least 20 feet long. He took the surfboard to the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco to compare the tooth marks with specimens of great white shark teeth. Miller, who is the author of an exhaustive study of unprovoked hark attacks occurring on the coasts of California and Oregon between 1925 and 1979, said that 49 such attacks have been recorded since 1926. He said all of those occurred north of Point Conception and are believed to involve white sharks. Miller’s study indicates that a shark could mistake a surfer lying on his board with his arms and legs extended for an elephant or harbor seal, the primary food of white sharks, and could launch an attack on that basis. In late October, the F&G biologists put out a white shark advisory for the local area. An increase in the number of otters killed by white sharks pointed to an upsurge in their numbers in local waters. The largest great white shark ever captures – off the coast of Cuba – was about 21 feet long. Sharks up to 40 feet long have been reported; although none that size have been caught. Funeral arrangements for Boren are pending at the Paul Mortuary in Pacific Grove.
Copyright (c) 2009 The Monterey County Herald

Monterey Peninsula Herald, CA Jan 1, 1982 p4
Memorial Service Set For Lewis A. Boren
A memorial service for Lewis A. Boren, 24, of Pacific Grove, will be held Monday at 7 p.m. at the First Christian Church, El Dorado and Maple Avenue, in Torrance, his family’s home. Mr. Boren died Dec. 19 when a shark attacked him as he was surfing off Spanish Bay.
Copyright (c) 2008 The Monterey County Herald


BOREN LEWIS ARCHER 1957 01 24 KELDRAUK MALE CA MONTEREY 1981 12 19 569969946 24
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