Tulare and Kings Counties, California

Biographies
1926

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ROY E PARKIN

The name of "Cy" Parkin is still remembered by baseball fans throughout the country. That "Cy" Parkin is the subject of this sketch. He was born in Hudson, Lincoln county, South Dakota, August 11, 1878. His father was James Parkin, proprietor of a hotel, and his mother's maiden name was Amanda Allen. Both parents are now deceased.

 

Roy E. Parkin was educated in the public schools of his native state. While still in his school days he attracted attention as an amateur baseball player of more than ordinary ability. After completing his schooling he took up professional baseball and followed that occupation in several of the leading cities of the country. Among the teams with which he played were: Marshalltown, Iowa; the St. Paul Club of the American Association; the New York American League team; Newark, New Jersey; Atlantic City; and the Oakland and San Francisco Clubs of the Pacific Coast League.

After some fifteen years on the diamond he turned his attention to other lines of business and for the last seven years has been with the Union Oil Company. In 1920 that company sent him to Visalia to establish its business there and he succeeded so well that he was soon promoted to the position of manager, which he held until March, 1925. In March, 1925, he established a supply or distributing station at the end of East Main street, where he carries a full line of gas, oil and grease a wholesale business. Later he will put in a service station. He covers fifteen miles square in territory. He devoted the same attention to selling oil that he did to playing baseball and his trade constantly grew. Since coming to Visalia he has formed many acquaintances and has won popularity by his interest in local matters. He is a member of the Rotary Club and always stands ready to forward any project for the advancement of Visalia's interests.

 

Mr. Parkin was married to Miss Edith Frink, a native daughter of California, and they have one son, named Blaine Parkin. Mr. Parkin is a republican in his political affiliations; is a Royal Arch Mason, and a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His principal pastimes are camping out and hunting.

 

E H HARDEL

For more than thirty years E. H. Hardell, treasurer of the city of Porterville and one of its well known and substantial merchants, has been a resident of California, and during that time has had a variety of experiences out of which he has gained a thorough acquaintance with local conditions. He also is traditionally connected with the pioneer period of this state, for his paternal grandfather, W. J. Hardell, was one of the '49ers who came in here in the time of the great "gold rush" and was one of the active participants in the stirring adventures of that period. E. H. Hardell was born in LeMars, county seat of the county of Plymouth, Iowa, October 27, 1876, and is a son of Frank and Elizabeth (Schneider) Hardell, who in 1893 came with their family to California and located in Madera, and both are still living. For some time after his arrival in California, Frank Hardell was engaged in the transfer business at Madera, but of late years he has been connected with the operations of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company.

 

As will be observed by a comparison of above dates, E. H. Hardell was but sixteen years of age when he came to California with his parents in the spring of 1893 and for some time after his arrival here he was an aid to his father in the latter's transfer business in Madera. He then was for two years in the livery business in Madera and Fresno, after which he began "railroading" with the Southern Pacific Railroad Company. That was in 1901, and he continued this employment until 1913, making his home in Porterville. In 1912, while still thus employed, Mr. Hardell opened a billiard parlor in Porterville and thus became engaged in business there. Not long afterward he sold this place and established himself in his present line, stationery and cigars, and has done very well as proprietor of the leading exclusive stationery establishment in the city. In 1920 Mr. Hardell was appointed city treasurer to fill an unexpired term in that important public office and in the ensuing election was returned to that office by the franchise of the people of the city. In the next election he was reelected treasurer of the city and is thus now (1925) serving his third term in that office, one of the most popular public officials in the county.

 

Mr. Hardell was united in marriage to Mrs. Frances Morgan, and they have two daughters, Corinne and Lilias. Mr. and Mrs. Hardell take a proper interest in the general civic and social affairs of the community, Mr. Hardell being regarded as one of the leaders of his party hereabout. He also takes an interested part in certain of the fraternal society activities of the city and is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

 

 

CHARLES W CARTER

Though but a few years in residence in Pixley, Charles W. Carter a well established druggist and progressive business man of that thriving village, has impressed himself definitely upon the general community life of that section and has thus come to be recognized as a distinct acquisition to commercial circles in Tulare county. Mr. Carter is a New Englander by birth, a native of the old Green Mountain state, but is a resident of California by choice and inclination and is thoroughly devoted to the interests of his adopted state, of which he has been a resident for about fifteen years. He was born in Gouldsville, in the state of Vermont, a son of C. W. and Georgiana (Ainsworth) Carter, both members of old families in that state and the former of whom is a veteran railway engineer.

 

Reared in his home place, Charles W. Carter attended the schools of that place and early became attracted to the drug trade. After clerking for some time in a local drug store, he entered the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy at Boston and after his graduation from that institution became employed as a professional pharmacist in Boston. Mr. Carter remained in Boston until 1911, when he came to California and became connected with the operations of the Owl Drug Company inLos Angeles. A year later he took a connection with a drug store in Santa Barbara, from there went to El Centro, and from the latter place went to Fowler, Fresno county, where he became engaged in the drug business on his own account. For two years Mr. Carter carried on this business in Fowler, and then, in 1923, recognizing a fine opportunity opening out in Pixley, he disposed of his holdings in Fowler, came to Tulare county and bought the Moffitt branch store in Pixley, where he since has been quite successfully engaged in business, one of the most progressive and up-to-date druggists in this section. Mr. Carter has a well equipped and well appointed place of business and is doing well, a professional pharmacist of widely recognized capacity.

 

On June 18, 1916, in Los Angeles, Mr. Carter was united in marriage to Miss Linnie Nicholson, who was born in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, daughter of Murdock Nicholson. Mr. and Mrs. Carter have one child: A son, C. W. Carter (III). Mrs. Carter is a trained and competent business woman and is a valuable helpmate to her husband in the management of the store in Pixley. The Carters have a very pleasant home, a modern bungalow erected by Mr. Carter not long after he became a resident of Pixley, and are quite comfortably situated in their new home, welcome additions to the social life of the community. Mr. Carter is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and takes a proper interest in the affairs of that popular fraternal order.

 

 

HENRY J VERFURTH

Among the additions to the population of Visalia, California, within the last few years, Henry J. Verfurth, proprietor of the Verfurth Auto Electric Service, located at Acequia and Locust streets, is entitled to more than passing notice as one of the city's most progressive business men and a recognized asset to the community. He was born in Darboy, Wisconsin, July 24, 1887, and is a son of Barney and Lucille (Surges) Verfurth. Both parents are still living and the father is actively engaged in business as a dealer in shoes.

 

Henry J. Verfurth was educated in the Wisconsin public schools, after which he took a position in the testing department of the Cutler & Hammer Electric Company of Milwaukee, manufacturers of all kinds of electric rheostats. About eighteen months later he went to the Briggs Car Company, where he had charge of the generators mounted on the car axles for generating the lighting current. While with this company he assisted in installing the first electric equipment on the famous Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad electric train, that pulls the fast passenger trains through the Rocky Mountain region.

 

Leaving the Briggs Car Company, he took a position with another Milwaukee concern and for some time was employed in electrical construction on some of the largest office buildings and public edifices of that city. He was then with the Meyer Boot & Shoe Company of Milwaukee as maintenance man, looking after all the electrical appliances used by that company. In 1907 he was caught by the wanderlust and came to Portervine, California, where for about three years he was with the Mount Whitney Electric Light & Power Company. That company then sent him to Exeter to take charge of the station there. Not long after this he left the Mount Whitney Company to accept a position with the Visalia-Electric Railway Company as chief electrician. He was next with the Tulare County Power Company, changing motors to operate on what is known as the three-phase system.

 

In 1913, under the name of the Central California Electric Company, he opened a shop in Lindsay for rewinding and making general repairs on various types of motors. A branch was opened in Visalia in 1919 as a battery and auto electric service station. The next year he opened a station in Tulare. In 1921 he sold his interest in the Central California Electric Company and located in Tulare to give his entire time and attention to his business in that place. The following year he disposed of all his interests except the shop in Visalia. On August 1, 1923, he removed to his present location, after overhauling and enlarging the building, installing new equipment for handling his growing trade, etc. He employs five men all the time and the character of his service is always kept up to the highest possible standard.

 

Since becoming a resident of Visalia, Mr. Verfurth has identified himself with all the agencies having for their object the general improvement of business and civic conditions. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the Commercial Club and the Rotary Club, and in these bodies he is among the first to aid any movement calculated to promote the moral and material welfare of both city and county. Politically he is a republican and his fraternal relations are with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Moose.

 

On January 1, 1910, Mr. Verfurth was married to Miss Wilma E. Johnson, who was born in Exeter, California, and reared in Lindsay, and they have one daughter, named Mildred Elaine. Mr. Verfurth is the owner of considerable real estate in Lindsay and Porterville, and is well and favorably known.

 

MISS AUDLEY CROWLEY

The student of history knows that for centuries woman was considered man's inferior in intellect and executive ability, incapable of holding public positions of trust and responsibility. Old persons now living can recall when a woman in public office would have been regarded as very much out of place. But the world moves, public opinion changes, until now there is scarcely a state in the American Union without women in some of the most important local offices. With the adoption of the nineteenth amendment to the Federal Constitution in 1920, it was provided that "The right of citizens to vote shall not be denied because of sex", and congress was given power to enforce the amendment by appropriate legislation.

 

Since that amendment went into effect women have enjoyed equal political rights and privileges with men. In 1924 at least two states Texas and Wyoming elected women to the office of governor. California, however, had adopted a liberal policy toward the sex long before the National Constitution was thus amended, and as early as 1914 Miss Audley Crowley was elected to the office of tax collector for Tulare county. Miss Crowley was born in Benson, Arizona, on December 12, 1889, though her immediate ancestors on both sides were among the California pioneers. Her paternal grandfather, Greenleaf Crowley, was a native of Virginia. He crossed the plains in early days and became a large landowner, farmer and stock raiser in Tulare county, California. Her maternal grandfather crossed the plains in 1856. From her childhood she has been a resident of Visalia. After attending the local schools, graduating from the Visalia high school, she completed the course in the University of California. She then took the business course in the Oakland Polytechnic College and for some time after completing her education was a stenographer in the office of Judge Allen.

 

Leaving her position with Judge Allen, Miss Crowley was appointed a clerk in the tax collector's office under J. W. Fewel. While in this position she saw numerous places where reforms might be introduced in conducting the business of the office, and in 1914 she decided to become a candidate for tax collector. Notwithstanding the fact that she had two strong opponents, she carried the primaries by a substantial majority and was elected, the first woman to be elected to the office of county tax collector in the state of California. She at once set to work to institute the reforms she had in mind. By the installation of loose leaf ledgers, the Remington bookkeeping machines, and making all tax bills in duplicate on the typewriter, she has reduced the number of clerks in the office, thus cutting down expenses and at the same time increasing the efficiency of the office.

 

At the close of her first term she was re-elected without opposition and at the expiration of that term was again elected. She is now (1925) serving her third term. Miss Crowley is recognized as one of the most progressive and public-spirited women of the county. She is a member of the Visalia Board of Trade, the Chamber of Commerce and the Women's Welfare Club, and is always ready to extend a helping hand to any project for the promotion of the public health, morals, education or the general welfare.

ROSS GRAHAM

It is proper to judge of a man's life by the estimation in which he is held by his fellow citizens, who have ample opportunity to judge of his character, for "actions speak louder than words." The consensus of opinion is that Ross Graham is entitled to be numbered among the progressive and enterprising men of his community, of which he is one of The very oldest inhabitants in point of years of continuous residence. He was born January 31, 1889, in Farmersville, California, the son of Edward and Sarah (Gillmore) Graham, the former of whom met an accidental death by a mine cave-in before his son was born.

 

Ross Graham was reared by an aunt, Mrs. William Rice of Tipton, and secured his education in the common schools of this locality. In boyhood he began working at anything he could find to do, being employed on ranches and stock farms until 1912, when he engaged in business on his own account as a truck and transfer man. Beginning in a modest way, he so conducted his business as to win the confidence and good will of the community and his business has steadily grown until today he owns and operates several trucks and employs three men most of the time. He also handles the ice business for this city and is meeting with a very gratifying measure of success. Courteous and accommodating, and prompt and careful in his service he is enjoying his full share of the local business in his line. In 1920 Mr. Graham was appointed constable for his township and in 1922 was elected to that office for a four-year term.

 

Mr. Graham was married to Miss Elsie Huff, and they have one child: James Edward, born May 20, 1925. Mr. Graham is a member of the Independent Order of Foresters.

 

HUGO PETZOLDT

Though of European birth and rearing, Hugo Petzoldt, head of the Dinuba Agricultural Works in Dinuba, inventor and manufacturer of a number of ingenious and highly practical devices for the extension of the usefulness of farm tractors, and recognized as one of the leaders in the general industrial life of this section of the state, has been on this side of the Atlantic for twenty-five years, a resident of California since 1903, and is thus thoroughly familiar with conditions here, particularly with respect to farm needs. A trained and practical machinist when he came to this country, a skilled toolmaker and patternmaker and an expert worker in iron, Mr. Petzoldt extended his acquaintance with the iron industry after his arrival here and in time perfected several practical appliances for farm tractors, implements of such use and value that a wide market has been created for them. In 1920 he bought a blacksmith shop in Dinuba and began the manufacture of these devices, this business since having been expanded into the Dinuba Agricultural Works, an industrial concern of which he is the head and owner. The success of the implements thus manufactured in Dinuba has been heralded abroad and Mr. Petzoldt has had letters of inquiry concerning his products from a number of foreign lands, including South America, the Philippines, Japan, Cuba, Russia, Egypt and other countries where the fame of these products has become known, so that an industry has been built up around these inventions in Dinuba which gives much promise of becoming one of the important industrial enterprises of the state.

 

Hugo Petzoldt was born in the kingdom of Saxony, a state of the German empire, February 5, 1872, and was reared in that land, receiving his schooling in his home place and becoming early apprenticed to the trade of a blacksmith. He served his three years of apprenticeship to this trade, thus becoming thoroughly well trained in the art and mystery of working in iron, and then served his three years in the German army, after which he started out as a journeyman blacksmith, and thus following his trade traveled pretty generally throughout Europe, touching at most of the important cities and manufacturing centers in Germany, Austria, Italy, Switzerland and Holland. In 1900, then being twenty- eight years of age, Mr. Petzoldt came to the United States and presently went down into Mexico, where he worked at his trade until 1903, when he came to California and became employed at his trade in Los Angeles, where he remained for some years, and where he took a course in the Polytechnic high school, attending night classes. While in Los Angeles, Mr. Petzoldt added to his knowledge of designing and became a recognized expert along that line, some of his designs in iron work, particularly with reference to ornamental iron work, attracting much attention. The front of the Old Mission theater in San Gabriel is of his designing and there are numerous other such samples of his artistic craftsmanship.

 

In 1916 Mr. Petzoldt came into the San Joaquin valley and was for several years located in Reedley, Fresno county. In 1920 he bought a blacksmith shop in Dinuba and became permanently located in that city. Extending the plant thus acquired by the addition of necessary machinery and equipment, Mr. Petzoldt began there the manufacture of the farm tractor devices he had invented and patented and has done very well in this line of industry, the products of his factory, as noted above, now being sought in a wide market. With the growing demand for his products, he is even now contemplating further expansion of his facilities for manufacturing, with the expectation of building up in Dinuba an industry of large importance.

 

JEAN B BILHOU

Jean B. Bilhou, one of the best known sheep men in Tulare county and for twenty years and more a resident of Porterville, where he and his family have a pleasant home on South Main street, is a native of the republic of France, but has been a resident of California since the days of his young manhood. He was born in the department of the Basses Pyrenees, in France,October 29, 1885, and is a son of Joseph and Ann Bilhou, both also natives of that country. He was reared in his native place and received his education there, remaining there until he Was nineteen years of age, when, in 1904, he came to the United States and by prior arrangement made his way on out to California and to compatriots who had become established in the Porterville district.

 

The day following his arrival in Porterville, Mr. Bilhou secured employment as a shepherd and thus entered upon a career which he has followed on to success, now being recognized as one of the leading sheepmen in this section of the state. He continued along this line, taking care of the sheep in some of the big flocks in the Porterville district, and was thus employed for years, or until 1917, by which time he had accumulated a fund which enabled him to own a flock of his own. In that year he bought one thousand sheep and started in as a sheep man on his own account, grazing his flocks on the nearby hillsides. Though he has met with numerous trials common to the sheep business since he ventured out "on his own", Mr. Bilhou has done well in the main and now feels that the worst of these trials are over, for he now has become well established in the business and has a profitable flock.

 

On December 18, 1909, in Porterville, Mr. Bilhou was united in marriage to Miss Theresa Camou, who also was born in France and who has been a resident of California since 1908. They have two sons : Ernest and Eloy Bilhou, who are now attending the public schools in Porterville. The Bilhous have a comfortable home on South Main street and are very pleasantly situated. When he came to California, Mr. Bilhou was unacquainted with the language of his adopted country, but by attention and application he soon acquired a good working knowledge of the tongue, and where he presently acquired his American citizenship he was able to feel that he was a true Californian indeed. He takes a warm interest in local civic affairs and does his part as a good citizen in promoting the general interests of the community. He is affiliated with the local camp of the Modern Woodmen and in the affairs of that popular fraternal organization takes an active interest.

 

ELMO R ZUMWALT M D

For many years the name of Zumwalt has been known in Tulare county, California. John B. Zumwalt, the grandfather of Dr. Elmo R., was one of the county's pioneers, and the old Zumwalt ranch, known as the Reno Ranch, is one of the oldest in the county. Before locating in Tulare county, John B. Zumwalt lived in Sutter county, where his son, J. E. Zumwalt, was born. The latter married Miss Mabel Ford, a native of Missouri, and Dr. Elmo R. Zumwalt is one of their children.

 

Elmo R. Zumwalt was born in Tulare, California, February 7, 1892. After attending the public schools in Dixon and Richmond, California, he entered the medical department of the University of California, from which he graduated as a member of the class of 1917, receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine. The United States Congress had just declared war against the imperial German government and the young physician offered his services to the Medical Corps of the United States army. He was accepted, commissioned first lieutenant, and was stationed at AngelIsland, in San Francisco bay, from November, 1917, to December, 1918, when he was mustered out and honorably discharged.

 

Upon leaving the army Dr. Zumwalt located in Tulare, where he has since practiced his profession with satisfactory results. He is a member of the Tulare County, California State and American Medical Associations.

 

Dr. Zumwalt was married to Miss Frances Frank, who was born in the state of Vermont, and who holds an M. D. degree from the University of Southern California. They have four children: Saralee, Elmo Russell Jr., Bruce Craig, and James Gregory. Fraternally the Doctor is a member of Olive Branch Lodge No. 269, F. & A. M., and of the American Legion. He is president of the Tulare Rotary Club and takes an interest in every project calculated to promote the general welfare of the community in which he lives.

 

J A BRUMAGIM

J. A. Brumagim, one of Tulare county's enterprising farmers and successful merchants, has succeeded at his life work through his own indefatigable efforts and the strictest regard for the highest standards of business ethics. He was born in Chautauqua county, New York, on the 20th day of February, 1878, and is the son of Thayer and Esther (Nichols) Brumagim, both of whom were natives of New York state, as was also the subject's grandfather, Richard Brumagim.

 

Until the age of sixteen years, J. A. Brumagim remained on the home farm, attending the common schools, and then entered high school, followed by two years in Allegheny College, at Meadville, Pennsylvania. He was compelled to work his way through high school and college, doing farm or other work in summers and attending school in the winter time. After leaving college he went to Lakewood, Ohio, where he was employed as clerk in a store. Eventually he established a grocery store of his own and ran that successfully until 1911, when he came to California. After spending a few months in Los Angeles, he came to Tulare county and bought twenty acres of land near Terra Bella, to the improvement of which he vigorously applied his energies. The following year he bought a store in Terra Bella and has since conducted this, gradually enlarging the stock until now he has a large and well stocked general merchandise establishment, which commands its full share of the local trade. Mr. Brumagim lives on his ranch, which he has improved in many respects, having planted fifteen acres to oranges. Good judgment and persistent industry have enabled him to accomplish much since coming to this locality and today he is numbered among the representative men of the community.

 

Mr. Brumagim was married in October, 1911, to Miss Lucinda Couch, who was born and reared in Alliance, Ohio, and to them have been born four children: Duane, Jeanne, Francis and William. Mr. Brumagim has been a member of the Masonic order for many years, belonging to the lodge and the chapter. At his former home in Lakewood, Ohio, he was a charter member of these two branches of Masonry, now holding affiliation with Lakewood Lodge No. 601, A. F. & A. M., and Cunningham Chapter No. 1, R. A. M. Mrs. Brumagim is a member of the Women's Improvement Club of Terra Bella.

 

HARRY CROWE

The record of Harry Crowe is that of a man who by his own unaided efforts has worked his way from a modest beginning to a position of influence in the business world. His life has been of unceasing industry and perseverance and the systematic and honorable methods which he has followed have won him the unbounded confidence of his fellow citizens of Tulare county. He was born in Lorane, Oregon, on the 9th day of June, 1884, the son of William N. and Lilly (Harris) Crowe, the former of whom followed the profession of school teaching. The father is dead. The mother resides in Lane county, Oregon.

 

After completing his elemental education in the public and high schools of his native city, Harry Crowe attended the University of Oregon, at Eugene. He taught school for a year and for two years was employed as clerk in a store in Astoria. He then went to Portland and entered the employ of R. G. Dun & Company, with whom he remained a year, after which he turned his attention to timber claims and while occupied with his claim he organized and established the first creameries in that section of Oregon. In 19)7 Mr. Crowe came to Fresno and for the following two years was in the employ of the Capitol Carriage Company. He then joined the Fresno Agricultural Works, which he served as a traveling salesman throughout the San Joaquin valley for three years. In 1912 he came to Tulare and engaged in business, the subsequent success of which has proved the soundness of his judgment. He carries a large and well selected line of electric goods of all kinds. He also is a large dealer in pumps of every description, but particularly those used in irrigation purposes. In connection with the store is a large and well equipped machine shop where repairs are made on pumps, particularly those of large size and intricate design. Mr. Crowe employs thirty people and prompt service and conscientious attention to the wants of his customers has brought to him not only a large and constantly increasing patronage, but also that respect and confidence throughout the community which is of so much more value than material income. Mr. Crowe has contributed in a very definite way to the advancement of irrigation in this locality by his thorough knowledge and efficiency in the handling of pumps, which are so important an element in the successful operation of irrigation systems. Progressive and energetic in his make-up, he is a constant booster of everything that tends to contribute to the material, civic or moral welfare of the community, and his efforts are fully appreciated by his fellow citizens.

 

Mr. Crowe was married to Miss Agnes Deason. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles.

 

JAMES F GRABER

James F. Graber, proprietor of the Graber Music Company of Visalia, California, was born in Springfield, Missouri, March 18, 1867, his parents, William and Kate Graber, being among the honored residents of that city.

 

The musician, like the poet, is born, not made. James F. Graber was born with a liking for music. While attending the public schools of his native city, where he received his education, he developed his taste for good music and upon leaving school pursued his musical studies systematically. In a comparatively short time he became a proficient performer on the cornet and his association with some of the leading bands or orchestras took him professionally to all the principal cities of the country. He also spent some time in teaching music.

 

In the fall of 1909 Mr. Graber came to California, and during his first three years in the state was located in Kingsburg. He then came to Visalia, where he organized the Boys' Band, of which he is still the instructor. Mr. Graber plays all band instruments, but he sticks to the cornet, which was his first love, so to speak.. July, 1922, he opened his store, now located at No. 204 East Main street; where he carries a complete line of musical instruments, sheet music, graphophones in fact, everything usually found in a first-class music store.

 

Mr. Graber's wife was before her marriage Miss Lucy Fink. They make their home in Visalia. While Mr. Graber takes an interest in public affairs, he is not a strict partisan, preferring to vote for the man rather than to sustain a party. He encourages and assists every movement for the civic advancement of the community. The only fraternal organization to claim his membership is the Modern Woodmen of America.

 

LEWIS L SELIGMAN, M D

The medical profession of Tulare county has an able exponent Dr: Lewis L. Seligman, who, although comparatively young in years, has firmly established himself in his profession and won the confidence and esteem of the people and his professional brethren in this community. Lewis L. Seligman is a native of the San Joaquin valley, born in Traver, Tulare county, on the 8th day of October, 1893, the son of Emil and Anna (Frey) Seligman, the former of whom is the oldest merchant in this locality in the point of continuous operation.

 

Lewis L. Seligman secured his elemental education in the public schools, graduating from high school. Having determined to devote his life to the practice of medicine, he then matriculated in the Medical School of the University of California, from which he was graduated with the class of 1917. During the following year he served an internship in Mount Zion Hospital, in San Francisco, and then entered the army as a member of the Medical Corps, with the rank of first lieutenant, being stationed on Angel Island. After his discharge from the army, Dr. Seligman took a six-month postgraduate course in the Medical School of Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore, Maryland, and in 1920 he came to Dinuba and entered upon the active practice of his profession. He has already acquired distinction in his calling and those who know him are unstinted in their praise of his ability and skill. He practices both medicine and surgery and is in command of a large clientele. Personally, Dr. Seligman possesses to a marked degree those qualities which win friends, and he is extremely popular throughout the community.

 

Dr. Seligman was married to Honor Kathleen Pettit of Fresno county, and they have a son, Carl B. Dr. Seligman is a Mason, in which order he has taken the degrees of the Scottish Rite, is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, and belongs to the American Legion and the Lions Club. He holds professional membership in the Tulare County Medical Society, the California State Medical Society and the American Medical Association.

 

MISS NANNA GRANT

It was but a few years ago that the well equipped hospital and trained nurse existed only in the minds of the progressive physicians of the country, who saw the necessity for better facilities for caring for the afflicted. Through the influence of these far-seeing doctors hospitals have been greatly improved, training schools for nurses have been established, until now almost every city has one or more institutions in which the sick can receive proper attention.

 

Miss Nanna Grant, superintendent of the Kaweah Hospital in Visalia, California, is a native of Kentucky, where she received her general education in the public and high schools. In 1900 she came to California with her parents, C. A. and Catherine (Shoemaker) Grant. They located in Visalia, where for nineteen years her father was the watchman for the merchants of the city. He is new an invalid and is cared for by his daughter.

 

In 1906 Miss Grant entered training for a professional nurse and was graduated in 1909. She was immediately made head nurse in the Visalia General Hospital, in which position she remained until 1920, when she resigned to accept the superintendency of the Kaweah Hospital. This institution, which is still under her practical and efficient management, is open to all the physicians of Visalia and has become so popular that patients frequently have to be turned away for lack of room.

 

With the adoption of the nineteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States, giving women the right of suffrage, Miss Grant cast in her lot with the democratic party. While she takes a general interest in political matters both local and national her time is all devoted to her profession, which is her only hobby. She is recognized by the physicians of the city as a careful, capable nurse, conservative without being nonprogressive, adhering strictly to approved methods until new ones have demonstrated their merit.

 

 

JOHN M WITT

John M. Witt, veteran plumber and worker in sheet metal in Porterville, and proprietor there of the oldest establishment of its sort in con­tinuous operation in that city, was born in Porterville and has lived there all his life, thus having seen the development of that city from its village days. In this development he has done well his part, his contribution to the building of the community having been a no inconsiderable one, for he has been connected with the plumbing industry since the days of his boyhood and has thus had a part in much of the construction work that has gone on there during these years. He was born in Porterville, August 22, 1873, and is the fourth in order of birth of the nine children born to Henry S. and Anna (Murray) Witt, pioneers of this county and both now deceased. The Witts are one of the old American colonial families, the progenitor in the United States having been a Huguenot refugee from France who came to the American colonies and established himself in Virginia, whence the family in later generations became widely distributed over the country. Henry S. Witt was born in Arkansas. In 1859 he came to California, crossing the plains with a wagon train and by reason of unlooked for setbacks and hardships was more than a year in making the crossing. For some time after his arrival here he followed mining in Placerville and later settled in Tulare county, where he established his home and where he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives, his death occurring in 1897 and hers in 1924. As most of their nine children lived to maturity and reared families of their own, the descendants of this pioneer couple in the present generation form a considerable family connection.

 

Reared on the home farm in the vicinity of Porterville, John M. Witt acquired his education in the Porterville schools and remained on the farm until he was twenty years of age, when he became apprenticed to the plumber's and sheet metal worker's trade in Porterville. Upon completing his trade he worked as a journeyman plumber for some time and then, in 1900, became engaged in the plumbing business on his own account, setting up an establishment in Porterville which ever since has occupied his attention, and which now, as stated above, is the oldest establishment of its kind in the city. In addition to his general plumbing work, Mr. Witt also has done much in the sheet metal line, and the evidences of his careful handiwork are found in many of the notable bits of building construction erected hereabout during the past quarter of a century. He now has associated with him in his business his youngest son, Roy Witt, who has grown up in the business and who has been a valuable aid in its later development.

 

On October 10, 1893, in Porterville, John M. Witt was united in marriage to Miss Nettie Thompson, who also was born in California, and they have three children: Merle, Virgie and Roy, and four grandchildren. Mr. Witt is an "independent" in his political views. He is a member of the local lodge' of the Knights of Pythias and is also affiliated with the Woodmen of the World.

 

R C STURGEON

Among the sons of the Hawkeye state who have become residents of California, R. C. Sturgeon occupies a prominent position in financial and industrial circles and in the political affairs of Tulare county. He was born on a farm in Wright county, Iowa, January 29, 1884 ; received a good education in the schools of that county, and began his business career as a real estate operator and insurance agent in the city of Clarion, Iowa. Later he became a member of the firm of Bennett & Sturgeon, dealers in lumber and grain in Clarion.

 

In 1913 he disposed of his interest in this business and came to Tulare county, California. Here, with his father-in-law, he purchased five hundred and twenty acres of the Paige & Morton ranch and embarked in stock raising. After a little while he turned his attention to the breeding of high-grade Holstein dairy cattle, in which he has been quite successful. In company with W. D. Cook and J. K. Macomber, Mr. Sturgeon organized the Farmers State Bank of Tulare, which opened its doors for business on January 3, 1921, and of which he is now vice president.

 

Mr. Sturgeon is a republican in politics and from the time he became a citizen of the county Mr. Sturgeon manifested an interest in public affairs. In February, 1923, he was appointed a member of the Tulare county board of supervisors by Governor Richardson, to fill an unexpired term, and on November 4, 1924, he was elected for a full term. As supervisor he has displayed the same qualities that have distinguished him in his private affairs the same careful investigation of every proposition that comes before the board, a strict integrity and a high order of executive ability.

 

In 1903 Mr. Sturgeon was united in marriage to Miss Maud D. Soults, a native of Iowa, and their children are: Kenneth, Clarence and Hortense. Mr. Sturgeon is a director of the Tulare Board of Trade, and also of the Tulare County Fair Association. It is safe to say he was chosen for these positions for his well-known progressive ideas and public spirit.

FRED E PAGE

Fred E. Page, manager of the Porterville branch of the automobile sales firm of Buszek & Cosart of Lindsay and one of the best known and most progressive young business men of that city, a veteran of the World War with an overseas record and in various ways actively and influentially identified with the social and commercial life of his home town, is a native of the old Sunflower state but has been a resident of California since the days of his childhood. He was born in the village of Effingham, Atchison county, in northeastern Kansas, on March 5, 1892, and is a son of E. C. and Pauline (Weit) Page, who came to California with their family in 1898 and after a some-time residence in Fresno located on a ranch in the immediate vicinity of Hanford, Kings county, where they are now living.

 

As will be observed by a comparison of above dates, Fred E. Page was but six years of age when he came to California with his parents in 1898, and he thus was reared in this state. He finished his education in the Hanford schools and as a young man became engaged in the bicycle business in that city, a line which he followed for five years, at the end of which time he set up an establishment there in the rented car line, but at the end of a year he gave that up and became connected with the mechanical operations of a Porterville garage and was thus employed when in the spring of 1917 this country took a hand in the World War. Mr. Page enlisted his services in behalf of the army and was for two years in service, eighteen months of this time being spent with the American Expeditionary Forces in France.

 

Upon receiving his discharge from the army in 1919, Mr. Page returned to Porterville and there became employed as shop foreman in the city garage, a situation he occupied for two years, or until 1921, when he became shop foreman in the Porterville branch plant of the Buszek & Cosart concern, dealers in automobiles and automobile supplies. Two years later he was made manager of the operations of this branch and he has since been thus engaged, one of the best known young automobile salesmen in this section of the state, and in charge of a well equipped establishment at No. 114 South Main street. This concern makes a specialty of the distribution throughout this territory of the Star automobile and has a well appointed salesroom in Porterville, carrying also an adequate stock of automobile accessories, and under the management of Mr. Page the business is thriving.

 

Mr. Page is a republican and has ever given his earnest attention to local civic affairs, interested in all proper movements and measures having to do with the promotion of the best interests of the community. He is an active member of the local post of the American Legion, is a member of the locally influential Lions Club, and is also affiliated with the local lodge of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

 

CALVIN TERWILLIGER

Calvin Terwilliger, proprietor of the Pioneer Meat Market, in Porterville, and a progressive and public-spirited young business man of that city, has been a resident of California for about fifteen years and has established for himself a very definite place in the community in which he lives. He was born on a farm in Seward county, Nebraska, June 11, 1891, a son of Albert and Etta (Wright) Terwilliger, who in 1911 came to California and established their home in Porterville, in the vicinity of which city Albert Terwilliger is engaged in orange growing.

 

Reared on the home farm in Nebraska, Calvin Terwilliger supplemented the education he acquired in the schools of his home place by a course in a business college in Omaha, and in 1911, accompanied his parents to California and became a resident of Porterville. During his first season here he worked in the orange groves and then became engaged in the operations of one of the local ice companies. In the next season he was employed in the old established Pioneer Meat Market, at that time being conducted by C. P. Mauser, and there he became thoroughly familiar with the details of the retail meat business as related to the trade area centering in Porterville. During the time of this country's participation in the military activities attendant upon the World War he worked in the shipyards at San Francisco and upon his return in 1919 resumed his place in the Pioneer market. In the next year Mr. Mauser's health began to fail, necessitating his retirement from business, and Mr. Terwilliger bought the plant, entering into possession on October 1, 1920, and he ever since has been quite successfully carrying on this business. In addition to the Pioneer market, the oldest establishment of its kind in continuous operation in Porterville, he also owns the City Cash Market, both of which are admirably equipped for the business in hand. Mr. Terwilliger maintains his own killing plant and his trade thus has the assurance of fresh and properly inspected products, all the government regulations covering inspection of meats being rigidly observed by him and his corps of assistants.

 

On December 25, 1912, in Porterville, Calvin Terwilliger was united in marriage to Miss Marguerite King, daughter of T. J. King, retired, of that place, a native daughter of California and a graduate of the Porterville high school. Mr. and Mrs. Terwilliger have one child, a son, Calvin K. Mr. Terwilliger is a democrat and Mrs. Terwilliger is a republican and both take a proper interest in the general affairs of the community in which they live. Mr. Terwilliger is a member of the Elks. He owns forty acres of land, planted to alfalfa, where his slaughter-home stands.

 

W F PRITCHARD

If it be proper to judge of the success of a man's life by the estimation in which he is held by his fellow citizens, then W. F. Pritchard must be numbered among the eminently successful men of his locality. He is a native of the Lone Star state, born in Dallas, on the 26th day of September, 1886. His parents, Thomas C. and Julia E. (Coons) Pritchard, were also natives of Texas, whence, in 1887, they came to California, locating first in San Diego. In 1893 they moved to Fresno, and ten years later established their permanent home in Oakland.

 

W. F. Pritchard secured his education in the public schools and after his graduation from high school he began clerking in a store. He followed that line of work in various stores in the Bay cities, and later went to work as a brakeman on the Southern Pacific Railroad. During this period he was on the lookout for a place in which to make permanent location and believing that there was a splendid future for Tulare county, he quit the railroad in 1911 and opened a store in Klink, now Ivanhoe. At that time he bought fourteen acres of land, which now comprise the townsite of Ivanhoe. He has been prosperous in his business affairs and is one of the leaders in business activities in that locality. He is the owner of about a dozen buildings in the town, and has also bought additional land, his holdings now amounting to about sixty acres, practically all under cultivation and planted to oranges, vineyard and alfalfa. In 1911 Mr. Pritchard was appointed postmaster of Ivanhoe and has served continuously since in that position. Mrs. Pritchard is assistant postmaster. Mr. Pritchard is a stockholder and has been a director in the Ivanhoe Green Fruit Association, was vice president of the Klink Citrus Association, and has rendered splendid service to his community as a member of the school and election boards.

 

Mr. Pritchard was married to Miss Caroline Knauth of Berkeley, California, and they have a son, Leland, who is a senior in the Visalia high school. Mr. Pritchard belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the Knights Templar degree of the York Rite, and is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and the Sciots. He is also a member of the California branch of the Postmasters League of America. Mr. Pritchard is a man of keen judgment and sound discrimination and has contributed in a very large measure to the development and prosperity of Ivanhoe, his standing among his fellow citizens being an enviable one.

 

JEAN McPHAILL

Under the laws of California all brands on live stock and all hides taken from such animals must be inspected by an authorized official before such hides or animals can be accepted for transportation in or from the state. The state hide and brand inspector for Tulare county is Jean McPhaill, who was born in Visalia, California, May 30, 1888 His father, James Samuel McPhaill, came to California early in 1871, but soon returned to his old home and was married to Miss Ella Welcome, who came to Visalia as a bride. James S. McPhall was for years one of Tulare county's best known school teachers and served for a time as county superintendent of schools. He then embarked in the real estate business, which he followed until his death. His widow is still living.

 

Jean McPhall received his elementary education in the Visalia public schools, attending the high school until he was sixteen years of age, when he obtained employment as a cowboy and for some time "rode the range." He was then engaged in buying and selling cattle until appointed to his present position on April 13, 1921. His previous experience in the live stock business gave him all the necessary qualifications for the performance of his duty as inspector, which takes him to all sections of the county.

 

Mr. McPhaill was united in marriage to Miss Ruth Wilson, who was born in Texas, but was brought to California by her parents when she was only about six weeks old. Mr. and Mrs. McPhaill have two children a son, named James Calvin, and a daughter, named Ella Belle. Politically Mr. McPhaill is a firm believer in the doctrines enunciated by the democratic party, and rarely fails to perform his duty on election day.

 

H A WOOLSEY

In the late '50s Robert Woolsey left his native state of New York, made the voyage around Cape Horn and landed in California. He first located in Sancha Plana, then a booming mining town, but about a year later he went to Ione, where he became a merchant. He married Mary Atkinson, a native of Ohio. Besides H. A. Woolsey of this review, they had one son and two daughters, viz.: E. G. Woolsey, now a dentist of Ione; Emma, now Mrs. B. H. Ford; and Mrs. May Gowett of Exeter. Robert Woolsey died in 1893 at the age of fifty-two years. His widow survived until November 7, 1924.

 

H. A. Woolsey was born in Ione, California, March 12, 1883. He received a public school education and at the age of sixteen years went to work in a butcher shop, where he learned all the details of killing animals and marketing the products. For three and a half years he was in business for himself in Ione before coming to Exeter. In 1910 he came to Exeter and bought out the Waddell market, the business of which he has increased until it now amounts to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars annually. He owns and operates his own slaughterhouse, has a complete equipment in the way of refrigerators, etc., and employs ten persons.

 

Mr. Woolsey was married on June 30, 1904, to Miss Nellie Harris of Ione, and they have two children: A son, named George, and a daughter, named Esther. Mrs. Woolsey died January 5, 1915. Mr. Woolsey is a republican in politics. Fraternally he is a Mason, and also belongs to the Exeter Chamber of Commerce and the Commercial Club.

FRED D STEEL

In every state of the American Union the sturdy Scotch-Irish character has been a factor in the general development, and at least six presidents of the United States have claimed a Scotch-Irish ancestry. Fred D. Steel, now engaged in a general insurance business in Visalia, California, is of Scotch-Irish extraction. He is a son of Warren B. and Elizabeth (Harnar) Steel and was born on a farm near Xenia, Ohio, November 23, 1875. He was educated in the common schools, the first union high school ever established in the state of Ohio, and in 1901 received the degree of Ph. B. from Antioch College.

 

Upon completing his education, Fred D. Steel took up railroad work and during the next four years was employed in various positions in that. connection in Colorado and Wyoming. On March 29, 1905, he landed in Visalia and took a position with the Earl Fruit Company. After a time- with this concern he was for two years bookkeeper for the Griffin &. Skelly Company. He then purchased an interest in the Visalia Abstract. Company and a little later opened the first exclusive insurance office between San Francisco and Los Angeles. Some who were inclined to see. only the dark side of things predicted failure when he opened his office at No. 110 South Court street on the first day of May, 1908, but for more than sixteen years he has gone steadily forward, each year bringing an increased volume of business. He still occupies the office where he first started in this new enterprise.

 

Mr. Steel is a prominent figure in Masonic circles, being a member of both the York and Scottish Rites. In the latter he has attained the thirty- second degree. He is recognized as one of the progressive men of Visalia, always ready to lend a helping hand to any project for the advancement of the general welfare. Mrs. Steel, before her marriage, was Miss Grace Robinson. She was born in Texas, but grew to womanhood in Colorado. They have two children: Helen and Harry. Mr. Steel owns valuable vineyard and orchard property adjoining Visalia, besides holdings in Nevada.

 

FRANK A ROUNSAVILLE

Frank A. Rounsaville of the Porterville Electric Company and one of the best known and most enterprising business men in that city, widely known throughout this section of the state, is a native son of California, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived in this state all his life, a resident of Porterville since the days of his boyhood. He thus has been a witness to the development of this thriving trade center since the days of its village struggles and in that development has ever taken an active part. He was born on a pioneer ranch in the immediate vicinity of what was then the village of Hanford, now the county seat of Kings county, but which then was included within the confines of Tulare county, May 1, 1879, and is a son of Green C. and Manilla (Hyatt) Rounsaville, the latter of whom also was born in Tulare county, daughter of a Mr. Hyatt, who was one of the early settlers here. She died in 1881, the subject of this sketch being then but two years of age. The late Green C. Rounsaville, whose last days were spent in Porterville, was born in the state of Tennessee and came to California during the days of the mining excitement. For some time he was located in Modesto, Stanislaus county, and then came to Tulare county, where after his marriage he established himself in the Hanford settlement. In 1889 he came to Porterville, where his last days were spent, his death occurring in 1914.

 

As will be observed by a comparison of above dates, Frank A. Rounsaville was ten years of age when his father settled in Porterville. He finished his early education in the schools of that city and when eighteen years of age became interested in electrical work, starting to work along that line in 1897 in Porterville. Under local direction he became a thoroughly qualified practical electrician and after some years of work along this line he engaged in business in the way of electrical installation and supplies in association with Robert Tschuney of Visalia, the two operating as a partnership under the name of the Visalia Electric Works, with an establishment in Visalia and one in Porterville, Mr. Rounsaville being in charge of the latter establishment. For three years this business was maintained and then the partners sold out and Mr. Rounsaville secured employment in a local machine shop, a vocation he followed for nine years, or until 1920, when, in association with W. C. Little, he formed his present connection and has since been in the electrical supply business in Porterville. He and his partner are doing business as the Porterville Electrical Works, with a well stocked and well equipped establishment at No. 517 Main street, where they are prepared to meet all the demands made upon their line in this trade area, not only in the line of contracting installations but in all sorts of electrical supplies, radio equipment and the like, and are doing very well. Mr. Rounsaville has come to be recognized as a local expert in radio development and has given the mysterious new agent a great deal of very careful thought.

 

On July 10, 1906, in Visalia, Frank A. Rounsaville was united in marriage to Miss Mary Wilson, who also was born in California, daughter of John Wilson of Visalia. Mr. and Mrs. Rounsaville have one child: A daughter, Alice. Mr. and Mrs. Rounsaville are republicans and take an interested part in the general civic affairs of the community as well as in the city's general social activities. Mr. Rounsaville is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and is also affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

 

OTTO LUETHKE

The two most strongly marked characteristics of both the east and the west are combined in the residents of the section of country of which this volume treats. The enthusiastic enterprise which overleaps all obstacles and makes possible almost any undertaking in the vigorous western states is tempered by the stable and more careful policy characteristic of our eastern neighbors, and the combination is one of unusual force and power. This happy combination of characteristics is possessed by the subject of this brief review, Otto Luethke, the well known and popular proprietor of the Central Garage in Tulare. He was born in Buffalo, New York, on the 7th day of July, 1879, the son of Christian and Lena Luethke. Some years after his birth the family moved to California, where the father died and the mother is now making her home in Los Angeles.

 

Otto Luethke acquired his education in the public schools of his native city and at the age of fourteen years he began to learn the trade of machinist. He proved to be naturally fitted for that work and became an expert in it. For a time he was employed in large shops in various cities of the east and then, in 1907, came to California and entered the employ of the Pierce-Arrow Automobile Company in San Francisco, with which concern he remained a year. He then came to Tulare and for four years worked for D. Helm in the Midway Garage, and was successful in building up the business in a very satisfactory manner. The following six-nionths he spent in Los Angeles, and then, returning to Tulare, was again employed in the Midway Garage. In 1914, in partnership with O. G. Ray, he bought a small garage, which they equipped and were so successful in building up a business that later they bought the corner where they are now located and have one of the leading garages in this section of the state. They carry on a general garage and repair business, having a well equipped machine shop in connection. Their shop is one hundred and fifty by one hundred and fifty feet in size and they can easily store three hundred cars. By careful attention to the needs of their customers, and prompt and reliable service they have not only, gained a large clientele, but have also won the respect and confidence of the entire community.

 

Mr. Luethke was married to Miss Lena Trautman, who was born and reared in Buffalo, New York, and they have one child, Herbert. Mr. Luethke is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. In political matters he is independent, voting for the men in his opinion best qualified for public office. Personally Mr. Luethke is companionable and agreeable, fond of outdoor life, and is a popular member of the circles in which he moves.

 

WILLIAM E SAVATEER

William E. Savateer, one of the proprietors of the Dinuba garage and salesroom at that place for the Overland and the Willys-Knight automobiles, one of the best known men in the automobile business in this section of the state, is a native of California and has lived here all his life, a resident of Dinuba for the past twenty-three years. He was born on a ranch in Lake county, May 1, 1844, a son of C. H. and Eva (Howard) Savateer, the latter of whom was born in that same county, daughter of James Howard, who came to this state by the plains route from Missouri in 1851 and became one of the pioneers of Lake county. C. H. Savateer was a native of the Hoosier state. He came to California in the days of his young manhood and was married here, for a time thereafter making his home in Lake county and then moving into San Luis Obispo county.

 

It was thus that William E. Savateer attended the schools of San Luis Obispo county. When seventeen years of age he became employed on the big cattle ranch of William R. Hearst in Cambria, that county, and was thus engaged until 1904, when, then being twenty years of age, he bought a bunch of cattle, drove them over the mountains to Dinuba and here began raising live stock on his own account. In that same year he was married and established his home in this county. For six years Mr. Savateer continued his live stock operations in the Dinuba neighborhood and then, in 1910, he sold his herd and went into the garage business in Dinuba, and he is now one of the veterans of the business in this section of the state. The Dinuba garage is an up-to-date and well equipped establishment at No. 230 East Tulare street, one of the best appointed garages in Tulare county, and is prepared for any sort of service that might be demanded along that line. They are also the local distributors for the Overland and Willys-Knight automobiles, the salesroom is well appointed, and a full line of automobile accessories is carried in stock.

 

Mr. Savateer has been twice married. In 1904 he was united in marriage to Miss Edna Bailey, who was born in Tulare county and who died in 1913, leaving two sons: Clyde Savateer, born in 1906; and Shirley Savateer, born in 1911. In 1913 Mr. Savateer was married to Miss Belva Pickering, who was born in the state of Pennsylvania, but who has been a resident of California since 1902. Mr. Savateer is a member of Dinuba Lodge No. 385, F. & A. M., and is also a member of the local lodge of the Woodmen of the World, to which he brought a demit from the Traver Lodge, which he had joined in 1905, the year after he had taken up his residence in this county. Mr. Savateer is a charter member of the local Lions Club and a member of the board of directors of that compact and efficient organization. He takes an active interest in the general affairs of the community and has long been recognized as one of the influential personal factors in local development and promotion work.

 

LOUIS W VILLEMIN

For more than twenty years Louis W. Villemin, head of the firm of Villemin, Job & Cheney, proprietors of a well equipped and up-to-date machine shop in Porterville and one of the best known and most active residents of that city, has been a resident of California, and each succeeding year of this residence has confirmed him in the belief that he followed a fine streak of fortune when he came to this state, for he has found conditions here very agreeable. For some time after coming here Mr. Villemin, an experienced and practiced machinist, was engaged in orange culture, but when his neighbors began to find out something about his skill as a mechanic, the demand upon his services for incidental neigh­borly repair work grew so insistent that he soon was almost obliged to return to his old trade. It was then that he formed his present industrial connection and established the machine shop which he since has been directing in Porterville, and in which business he has done very well.

 

Louis W. Villemin is a native of the old Badger state, born in the city of Prairie du Chien, on the Mississippi river, in Crawford county, southwestern Wisconsin, January 31, 1875, and is a son of Constant and Tharsilla (Richards) Villemin, the latter of whom, a native of Wisconsin, is still living, residing in Bemidji, Minnesota, now past eighty years of age. The late Constant Villemin, a veteran of the Civil war, was a native of France who had been a resident of this country since the days of his boyhood. During the time of the Civil war he served as a soldier of the Union, and afterward became a farmer in Wisconsin, a vocation he followed most of the remainder of his life.

 

Though reared on a farm, Louis W. Villemin was not attracted to farm life and as a lad began railroading, a line which he followed until his marriage at the age of twenty-four, in 1899, when he became a machinist and settled in North Dakota. In that state and in Minnesota and Manitoba he followed the machinist's trade for some time and then went back to railroading and became a locomotive engineer. While thus engaged he was employed in the service of the Canadian Northern Railroad Company, installing pumping plants at stations along the line of that road until 1904, when he came to California and became engaged in orange growing in the Porterville district. As noted above, his neighbors soon discovered his skill as a mechanic and the calls constantly made upon his services along that line revealed to him the need of a first-class machine shop in Porterville. It was then that Mr. Villemin formed his present partnership with Samuel N. Job and C. D. Cheney, both practical machinists, and established the machine works on Main and Locust streets that has since been developed into one of the best establishments of its kind in this section of the state, and in the direction of the affairs of which Mr. Villemin is the guiding spirit. This machine shop is equipped with modern machinery and appliances and is prepared to take care of anything in its line within the trade area centering in Porterville, the constantly increasing demands made upon this service attesting its quality.

 

Louis W. Villemin has been twice married, his first marriage having taken place while he was living in Wisconsin. By that union he had one child, a son, Louis William Villemin, a young man of much promise, who died on Mare Island, from influenza, in 1918, while serving the country as a soldier during the time of this country's participation in the World War, being then seventeen years of age. In Visalia Mr. Villemin was married to Miss Eva H. Haughn, who was born in California, and to this union three children have been born, two sons: Richard Scott and John Philip Villemin; and a daughter, Ruth. Mr. Villemin regards himself as an independent in his political actions, preferring to reserve his vote for such men as to him seem better qualified for office instead of being bound by party ties. He is a member of the fraternal beneficiary society of the Modern Woodmen of America and is also affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

JOSEPH PIERCE GANNON

Joseph Pierce Gannon, assistant secretary-treasurer of the Security Title Insurance & Guarantee Company of Visalia and secretary-treasurer of the Security Auxiliary Corporation, is a native son of California, born in Santa Rosa, July 27, 1896. His father, J. E. Gannon, was born in Sebastopol, California, and for several years was engaged in hop growing in Sonoma county. He was also in the grocery business and later was for some time in the county recorder's office in Santa Rosa. In 1903 he came to Visalia with the Rochdale Company and after acting as business manager of the Visalia Times for several years, he held the position of cashier of the Mount Whitney Power & Electric Company until his death, which occurred in 1912. He married Augusta Pierce, who was the mother of Joseph Pierce Gannon of this review.

 

Joseph Pierce Gannon came to Visalia with his parents in 1903, when he was but six years of age. He was educated in the public schools of that city, graduating from the high school as a member of the class of 1915. Upon leaving school he was for about six months in the employ of the Mount Whitney Power & Electric Company. He was then for a few months with the Tulare County Abstract Company, and the Abstract & Title Guarantee Company. His next employment was with the First National Bank of Visalia, from which he went to the Visalia Abstract Company. When that concern was merged with the Security Title Insurance & Guarantee Company he went along and now occupies the position of assistant secretary-treasurer, as above stated.

 

Mr. Gannon's wife was formerly Miss Irene Fox of St. Louis, Missouri, and they have one son, named. Pierce. Mr. Gannon is a consistent supporter of the political principles advocated by the republican party, but has never sought office. He is a member in good standing of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Rotary Club and the Chamber of Commerce, and is interested in every project intended to promote the moral and civic welfare of the city.

 

JAMES MORRIS HOOKS

In following out the career of one who has attained success solely through his own persistent efforts, there comes into view the intrinsic individuality which made such accomplishment possible, while at the same time there is enkindled a feeling of respect and admiration. James Morris Hooks, without the aid of inherited wealth or influential friends, has achieved a large success in his special business and is enjoying a splendid position among the representative business men of Tulare. He was born on his father's plantation in Texas, on the 31st day of March, 1871, the son of Thomas A. and Samanthe (Arnold) Hooks, both of whom are dead. The father fought valiantly in the cause of the South during the Civil war and followed contracting during all his active years.

 

James Morris Hooks acquired his education in the common schools of his native locality, remaining at home until nineteen years of age. He was from that time on variously employed for a number of years, working at painting, bricklaying and carpentry. Then, going to Waco, Texas, he became a driver for the Waco Steam Laundry. Two years later he went to Chicago, Illinois, where he was employed in laundry work for five years. In 1898 he returned home, but soon went back to Chicago, where he remained for six years. His next move was to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and there for two years he was manager of the Eureka Laundry. At the end of that time he went to Missoula, Montana, and some time later went to work for the Northern Pacific Railroad at that place. Subsequently he became connected with the Florence Steam Laundry in Missoula, Montana, which he operated until his removal to Tulare in 1907. His first venture here was in the dairy business, but finding that he was not fitted for that work, he went to Los Angeles, where for a time he was with the Sterling Laundry. Returning to Tulare, he entered the employ of the creamery at sixty dollars a month. A month later he leased the old laundry and continued to operate it. He was in three different locations and had two different partners. Eventually he bought his partner's interest and then proceeded to renovate and modernize the plant, making it in every respect up to date and equipped to do everything a high-class laundry is expected to do. Since this improvement, in 1921, the Model Laundry has proven worthy of its name and its patronage has steadily and constantly grown until today Mr. Hooks is enjoying a well-deserved measure of prosperity. Thirteen people are employed in its operation and prompt and satisfactory service have been the keynote of its success.

 

Politically Mr. Hooks is nominally a democrat, though in local affairs he invariably votes for the best men for office, regardless of party affiliation. He is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and of the Rotary Club.

 

Mr. Hooks was married to Miss Bertha Hollst of Chicago, Illinois, and they are the parents of four children: Marian, Inez, Charles and James. Mr. Hooks' name is synonymous with integrity, fair dealing and right methods. His standard is a high one and he lives up to his principles, therefore he enjoys an enviable standing among his fellowmen.

 

GLADYS R STEWART

Within recent years, and especially since the adoption of the nineteenth amendment to the Federal Constitution, women have come to occupy many public positions of trust and responsibility. One of these to be so honored is Miss Gladys R. Stewart, county clerk of Tulare county. She is a native of Visalia, a daughter of William C. and Emma (Weaver) Stewart, and was born April 1, 1894. The Weaver family came from Illinois. William C. Stewart came to California in the late '70s, met and became acquainted with Miss Emma Weaver, and they were married in Kings county. The Stewart family were of West Virginia and were agriculturists there.

 

Gladys R. Stewart is one of a family of seven children. She received her elementary education in the public schools and after graduating from the Visalia high school was employed by the Visalia Milling Company in an office position for about four years. In June, 1917, she was appointed a deputy in the county clerk's office. She was the successful candidate for clerk in 1922 and took office in January, 1923. Her education and business experience give her the best of qualifications for the position and her interest in the general welfare of her native city and county serves as a stimulus to perform her official duties in the best possible manner. She is a member of the Visalia Business Women's Club and belongs to the Presbyterian church. In her club and church work, as well as in the discharge of her functions as a county official, Miss Stewart has made many friends by her straightforwardness, her timely suggestions, and her willingness always to lend a helping hand when a helping hand is needed.

 

DECATUR HIGGINS

In the present complex state of modern civilization the purveyor of food for the multitude is an important factor. The grocer, the baker and the retail dealer in meats are as useful members of society as the financier and the professional man, even though they are not so widely known.

 

Decatur Higgins, proprietor of the Pioneer Meat Market, located in the city of Visalia, California, was born on a farm in the state of Missouri, April 19, 1889. He received a good practical education in the public schools of his native state, after which he, entered the employ of the Waters-Pierce Oil Company of St. Louis. During the three and a half years he was with this company he heard much about California, which influenced him to seek his fortune on the Pacific coast. In 1908 he located in Tulare. Six years later, 'in 1914, he came to Visalia and opened the Pioneer Meat Market. His previous experience, his judgment in the selection of meats, and his well known reputation for fair dealing have enabled him to build up a lucrative business.

 

While in Tulare Mr. Higgins was married to Miss Mabel Green, a native of that place, who has made many friends in Visalia. Mr. Higgins is a democrat in his political affiliations, but he is not especially active in political work. He is a member of the Visalia Rotary Club and belongs to the Masonic fraternity. During the ten years of his residence in Visalia he has shown a disposition to aid every movement for the general advancement of the community interests.

 

JOHN VAN BLARICOM

Among the citizens of Tulare who have by their earnest lives and the conscientious performance of their duties earned the appreciation and good will of their fellow citizens, stands John Van Blaricom, who occupies a responsible position as foreman in the water department of the city of Tulare. He is a native of the state of Minnesota, born on a farm, in March, 1874, the son of Philip and Roxy (Bailey) Van Blaricom.

 

John Van Blaricom acquired his education in the common schools of his home neighborhood and remained with his father during his boyhood years, his mother having died while he was a baby. At the age of sixteen years he went to work on his own account, working in the woods during the winter season and being employed in the Dakota harvest fields in the summers. In 1904 he went to Cuba, where for five years he was employed as superintendent of a cattle ranch. In 1907 he went to Florida, where during the following five years he worked in a crate factory. In 1913 Mr. Van Blaricom came to California and for two years was employed in ranch work near Tulare. In the fall of 1915 he entered the employ of the city of Tulare and two years later he was promoted to his present position, in which his sound judgment and his careful and painstaking work have wrought splendid results. During the period in which he has supervised the water lines of the city he has laid twenty thousand feet of new mains, worked over all the old mains and seen that the sewers were kept in good condition, thus maintaining the water service at a maximum of efficiency. By his faithful attention to the demands of his department, he has shown a commendable loyalty to the interests of the community, which has won him the favorable opinion of his fellow citizens.

 

Mr. Van Blaricom was married to Miss Addie Martin, who was born and reared in the state of Minnesota, and they are the parents of one child, Virginia. Politically Mr. Van Blaricom is affiliated with the republican party, though in local elections he is independent, voting invariably for the men whom he believes to be best fitted for the offices they seek.

 

R HILARY BOETTNER

R. Hilary Boettner, mine host of the Palace and California Hotels of Visalia, California, is a native of the Keystone state, having been born in Pottstown, January 13, 1886, son of John W. E. and Henrietta M. (Bleim) Boettner. Few men have had a more varied experience in the business world than Mr. Boettner. As a boy in Pennsylvania, he attended the common schools, afterward spending some time in the high and preparatory schools, and then started in to learn the trade of plumber. He followed that occupation for a number of years, when he decided to take Horace Greeley's advice and "go west."

 

In 1907 he landed in California with only fifty-five cents in his pocket. But he was blessed with good health and a determination to succeed, and soon found employment. For about eighteen months he was with the Haslett Warehouse Company in San Francisco as shipping clerk. He then went to Alameda, where he took a position as plumber for the city during the installation of the electrolier system in the streets. From Alameda he migrated to the San Joaquin valley, where he entered the employ of the Barnett Lumber Company of Tulare. This company sent him to Tipton to take charge of a lumber yard there, but he shortly afterward abandoned the lumber business for a life on a ranch, with Dr. Hull and John Hummell. His next employment was with the Los Angeles Creamery Company, installing its plant in Tulare. When the creamery was finished he went to Exeter, where for the next sixteen months he was manager of a bakery.

 

Mr. Boettner then came to Visalia and assumed the management of the California Hotel. A little later he took charge of the Harvey House and the San Joaquin Hotel, but disposed of these when he took over the management of the Palace Hotel. The two hotels now controlled by him contain sixty rooms each and the Palace had for years been the leading hostelry of Visalia. On April 19, 1920, his father joined him in Visalia and there passed the remainder of his life. In the hotel business Mr. Boettner seems to have "struck his gait." His long and varied experience in dealing with all sorts of people has made him a good judge of human nature, which often enables him to anticipate the wants of a guest before these wants have been expressed. Actuated by a desire to please and appreciative of the patronage of his guests, his hotels have become popular stopping places for many of the traveling public.

 

Mr. Boettner has remained true to Pennsylvania's political traditions and is an unswerving republican in his party affiliations. He is a member of the Visalia Kiwanis Club, belongs to all the various branches of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Loyal Order of Moose and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In all these organizations he stands well because of his often timely suggestions and general good fellowship.

Mr. Boettner has been twice married. One son was born to his first marriage. His present wife was Miss Agnes M. Rose of Pennsylvania, before her marriage.

 

CHESTER DOWELL

In the financial circles of Tulare county, California, few men are better known or more highly respected than Chester Dowell, who exercises supervision over the branches of the Pacific Southwest Trust & Savings Bank in Exeter, Lindsay, Porterville and Strathmore. He is a native of Cumberland, Iowa, where his father, W. A. Dowell, was one of the prominent merchants. His mother's maiden name was Martha J. Ash.

 

After attending the local public and high schools, Chester Dowell completed the collegiate course in Drake University, at Des Moines, Iowa. Upon leaving college he went into his father's store as a clerk and occupied that position for about five years. On December 1, 1904, he entered the employ of the First National Bank of Cumberland, beginning in one of the humblest positions, and eighteen months later was assistant cashier. At that time he left Iowa and came to California. Locating in Hanford, he was made assistant cashier of the Farmers & Merchants Bank of that place. While occupying this position he assisted in the organization of the Lindsay National Bank, which opened its doors for business on April 1, 1910, and of which he was the first cashier. Later he was elected vice president of the bank and took an active part in its management.

 

In 1917 Mr. Dowell purchased a controlling interest in the Pioneer Bank of Porterville. He remained at the head of that institution as president until January 1, 1924, when it was merged with the Pacific Southwest Trust & Savings Bank. Eighteen months later, on July 1, 1922, the Lindsay National Bank was also merged with the Pacific Southwest Trust & Savings Bank. Since that time he has had the supervision of the four banking institutions mentioned in the first paragraph of this sketch.

 

Mr. Dowell has a fine country estate on the Fremont Trail, where he resides in a beautiful modern home, which is one of the show places of the county. Besides his banking interests he owns olive and orange orchards and is associated with other local interests. He was one of the organizers and is now treasurer of the Lindsay Ripe Olive Company, whose ripe olive packing and canning plant is the largest in the world. His progressiveness, public spirit, and the high order of his executive ability have combined to make him one of the financial and industrial leaders of Tulare and the contiguous territory. He is a prominent member of the Chamber of Commerce and was one of the organizers of the Tulare County Golf and Country Club, of which he is treasurer. He finds much of his recreation upon the links, thus identifying himself with the social as well as the business life of his adopted city.

 

On January 9, 1907, Mr. Dowell and Miss Belvia Worthington of Cumberland, Iowa, were united in marriage. They have one son, Virgil C., who is now a junior in the Lindsay high school. Mr. Dowell is a republican in politics. In fraternal circles Mr. Dowell is likewise a familiar figure. He is a charter member of the Lindsay Lodge, F. & A. M., belongs to the Porterville Chapter, R. A. M., and to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

 

FRANK L KENNEDY

In connection with the great citrus fruit industry that has had so important a part in the development of the material interests of this section of California, there are few names better known than that of Frank L. Kennedy, manager of the Mid-California Citrus Association and manager of the Beattie Citrus Association. Mr. Kennedy is also widely known in the automobile trade hereabout, for he has for some years been engaged in the sale of tractors in Porterville and is also the local distributor in that city of the popular Maxwell and Chrysler cars and has a well equipped establishment and salesrooms there. Though not a native of California, Mr. Kennedy has been a resident of this state since the days of his boyhood and is recognized as one of the pioneers in the field of orange growing, having had his first experience in that line in Riverside county nearly forty years ago, and he thus knows the business "from the ground up".

Frank L. Kennedy is a native of the old Hawkeye state, born in the city of Red Oak, county seat of the county of Montgomery, in south≠western Iowa, December 29, 1871, son of William B. and Elmira (Loafbourrow) Kennedy, who in 1866 came to California with their family and settled in Riverside, where the latter is still living. Frank L. Kennedy became engaged in orange growing in Riverside county upon his arrival in this state nearly forty-years ago and was thus one of the pioneers in that line. He planted two orange groves in that county and developed a fine piece of orchard property.

It will be noted by a comparison of above dates that Frank L. Kennedy was not yet fifteen years of age when he came to California with his mother in 1886. He finished his schooling here and at once began to take an active part in the labors of developing his orchard interests, by the time he was ready to start out "on his own" having become a recognized expert in orange culture. He continued connected with this industry in Riverside until 1905, when his services were secured as the manager of the American Fruit Company's interests at Antioch, Contra Costa county. There he remained until the fall of 1906, when he transferred his services to the Porterville Citrus Association and moved to Porterville as the manager of that concern's interests here. This company at that time and long afterward was packing most of the citrus fruit shipped out of this region and as manager of the concern Mr. Kennedy did much to promote its interests and extend its operations.

For eight years Mr. Kennedy continued to manage the affairs of the Porterville Citrus Association. In 1914 he organized the Mid-California Citrus Association and was elected its head, a position he since has occupied, and in this capacity he has developed a fine business. In 1923 he took over the Beattie Citrus Association and has since been directing the affairs of that concern, being thus now in charge of two packing houses, and is doing well. In 1920 Mr. Kennedy, in addition to his other interests, engaged in the sale of farm tractors, and in 1922 assumed the local agency for the sale of Maxwell automobiles and Chrysler automobiles, with salesrooms in Porterville, and he has since been thus quite successfully engaged, with a well equipped establishment at No. 108 South Main street.

In 1900, in Riverside, Frank L. Kennedy was united in marriage to Miss Laura Birdsall of that place, and they have a very pleasant home in Porterville. Mrs. Kennedy was born in the state of Nebraska, daughter of C. C. Birdsall, but has been a resident of California since the days of her girlhood. Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy are republicans and take a proper interest in the general affairs of the community. Mr. Kennedy is a Knight Templar (York Rite) Mason and is also affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

FRANK SYLVESTER STEPHENSON

Improvement and progress may well be said to form the keynote to the character of Frank S. Stephenson, the efficient postmaster at Terra Bella, and the history of his community would be incomplete without specific mention of his career. Mr. Stephenson is the scion of a long line of sterling ancestors, the line in America running back to colonial days long anterior to the War of the Revolution, in which members of this family had an active part. It is also worthy of note that in every generation of the family since the sixteenth century there has been a Sylvester Stephenson. Frank Sylvester Stephenson's grandfather, Sylvester Stephenson, was a noted horseman in his day. His son, the father of Frank Sylvester of this review, also named Sylvester Stephenson, was a native of Illinois and a pioneer farmer of Clark county, that state. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having served three years as a member of the One Hundred and Thirty-ninth Illinois Light Artillery. He took part in many of the most important battles of that great conflict, including Antietam, Lookout Mountain and Gettysburg. After the war he made a trip through the south and in South Carolina met and fell in love with Jane Dunn, member of an old southern family who had lost all their property during the war. He was married to Jane Dunn and returned to Clark county, Illinois, where Mr. Stephenson operated a farm and was also engaged in the mercantile business in Marshall. He bought and sold farms and stores and was fairly successful in his operations.

Frank Sylvester Stephenson was born in Marshall, Clark county, Illinois, on the 27th day of February, 1879, and secured a good public school education. After graduating from high school he entered the Central Normal College, at Danville, Indiana, from which he was graduated. He then went to work for his father in the latter's store, giving his attention at first principally to the collection of accounts. Later he was taken into partnership by his father and eventually entered business on his own account. He met with a gratifying measure of success and in 1918 came to California for the benefit of his health and that of his wife. Soon after arriving here he obtained employment in the office of the Standard Oil Company, but the following year he bought a general store, which he conducted successfully until 1924, when he sold it. He still owns the building in which the store is located and also owns the post office building, which he erected especially for a post office. It is worthy of note that Terra Bella is the best housed third-class post office in the state of California. In 1921 Mr. Stephenson was appointed postmaster of Terra Bella and is still the incumbent of that office. Methodical in his attention to his duties, courteous to the patrons of the office and prompt in service, he has not only received the approval of the department, but his efforts have also been fully appreciated by his fellow citizens. Mrs. Stephenson is the efficient assistant postmaster. Mr. Stephenson is now state vice president of the National League of Postmasters, being in charge of the California State League, to which he gives considerable time and attention, all his work in this direction being without com≠pensation.

Mr. Stephenson was married on November  1, 1905, to Miss Etta Hornbrook, who was born and reared in Marshall, Illinois, a member of an old pioneer family of that locality and a former schoolmate of Mr. Stephenson's. To them has been born a son: Sylvester, who is a senior in the Porterville high school and chief editor of the school paper. Mr. Stephenson is a splendid example of the virile, progressive business man who believes in doing well whatever is worth doing at all, a man of keen discernment and sound judgment, and he enjoys to a marked degree the confidence and good will of the entire community in which he lives. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity.

A M RUMLEY

There could be no more comprehensive history written of a Community than that which deals with the life work of those who, by their own endeavor and indomitable energy, have placed themselves where they well deserve the title of "prominent and progressive." In the following lines will be found the record of one who has by his consistent life and business ability gained an exalted place in the esteem of his fellow citizens of Tulare county. A. M. Rumley is a native of the state of Iowa, born on a farm, on the 20th day of April, 1870. He is the son of Henry and Martha (Bernlow) Rumley, both of whom are now deceased. The father was a veteran of the Civil war and during the major portion of his life followed the vocation of farming.

A. M. Rumley attended the public and high schools of his native locality and upon attaining mature years went to Minnesota, where he learned the trade of carpenter. Three years later he returned to his native state, where he remained until 1903, when he came toTulare and engaged in general contracting. It was not long until his reliable and trustworthy business methods attracted attention and during the subsequent years he has been generally recognized as the leading contractor in this section of the valley. He has constructed many of the most important buildings here, including the Tulare Hotel, the largest and finest building in this city, the Methodist Episcopal church, and practically all of the better class of residences here. He thoroughly understands every detail of construction work and is a man of decided taste in architecture, so that his patrons have found his advice and suggestions timely and valuable.

Mr. Rumley was married to Miss Ethel Haydock, a native of Iowa, and they are the parents of four children: Floyd H., Alfred William, George Ross and Albert M., Jr. Politically Mr. Rumley gives his support to the republican party and though an aspirant for public office, he was elected a member of the board of aldermen, where he gives to the city's interest the same careful attention as he does to his own private affairs. Fraternally he is a Mason and has taken the degrees up to and including those of the Royal Arch Chapter; he also belongs to the Woodmen of the World. Tireless energy, keen perception, honesty of purpose, genius for devising and executing the right thing at the right time, are the chief characteristics of the man and are the elements which have contributed to the splendid success which has crowned his efforts since becoming identified with Tulare county.

JOHN P CARRERE

John P. Carrere, one of the well established and successful ranchers and sheep men of the Porterville district, owner of several well developed ranches and flocks of thousands of sheep, is a native of the republic of France but has been a resident of California since the days of his young manhood. He came here unacquainted with the language and the customs of the country in which he had decided to establish his home and by dint of close application and a measure of perseverance that cannot be too highly commended, has acquired a competence.

John P. Carrere was nineteen years of age when in 1890 he came to theUnited States and made his way out into California. For ten years he was engaged in various forms of labor in San Francisco and then, in 1900. he went to the ranch home of one of his friends. and compatriots in Kings county. He worked on that ranch for a year, at the end of which time he came to Tulare county and began working on ranches here, with particular reference to the care of sheep. In 1904 he found himself unable to collect in cash the wages due him for his last period of service and in lieu of cash accepted sheep. With this initial flock and with the aid of a partner who also was ready to start in the sheep business in a modest way, Mr. Carrere began his career as a sheep man, he and his partner starting in with a flock of six hundred sheep. Though during the intervening years Mr. Carrere has suffered not a few backsets and has had some "hard years", as have all the sheep men hereabout, his affairs have on the whole been marked by steady progress and he now has an aggregate flock of no fewer than four thousand sheep and is accounted one of the leaders in his line in this section. As his affairs prospered Mr. Carrere has also gradually added to his landholdings until now he is the owner of several well developed ranches in the Porterville district and is doing well.

On February 20, 1906, in San Francisco, J. P. Carrere was united in marriage to Miss Josephine Miramon, who also was born in France, daughter of Louis Miramon, and who has been a resident of California since 1900. Mr. and Mrs. Carrere have a comfortable home in Porterville, on B street, and have two children: A son, Albert J. Carrere, born in 1908; and a daughter, Celeste, born in 1914. The Carreres are republicans and Mr. Carrere is a member of the local lodge of the Loyal Order of Moose and of the local aerie of the Fraternal Order of Eagles. Their religious faith is that of the Catholic church.

FRED W STONE

Fred W. Stone, a well established contractor in the general line of plumbing, heating and sheet metal operations in Porterville and one of the best known business men in that city, has never had occasion to regret the choice which twenty years ago brought him to California. He not only has done well in business here but he has a pleasant home and the regard of countless friends, and is as enthusiastic in the praises of California as any native son possibly could be, for he has found it a land of many delights and is quite content here to remain. Mr Stone is a native of the old Buckeye state but has been a resident of California since the days of his young manhood, he and his wife having established their home here immediately following their marriage. He was born in the city of Toledo, on Lake Erie, in the state of Ohio, December 18, 1875, and is thus now in the very prime of his vigorous manhood. His parents, John S. and Margaret (Cameron) Stone, were members of old families in the Buckeye state.

Reared in Toledo, Fred W. Stone acquired his education in the schools of that city and early became interested in the mechanical trades, with particular reference to plumbing, heating, steam-fitting and sheet metal operations, and became a competent workman along those lines. Upon the completion of his trade he worked as a journeyman plumber in and about Toledo until 1906, when in answer to the call that went out for workmen in the building trades following the memorable disaster in the coast country in the spring of that year, he came to California:--Upon viewing the situation then presented here he realized the advantage of having a permanent residence here and returned to Toledo for the young lady to whom he had plighted his troth. They were married and straightway came to California and located in Fresno, Mr. Stone finding plenty of work at his trade there.

While thus employed in Fresno, Mr. Stone was sent by the contracting firm with which he was employed, to install the heating plant of the Congregational church in Porterville. That was in 1907 and he ever since has been a resident of Porterville. Upon completing the job on the church heating plant he was induced by Frank Mitchell to remain in Porterville and the two formed a partnership in business, a mutually agreeable arrangement that was maintained for ten years, since which time Mr. Stone has been in business independently and has a well equipped establishment at No. 306 Mill street, where he is prepared to handle any sort of a contract in the way of plumbing, heating or sheet metal work. When Mr. Stone arrived in Porterville he had besides his wife and the little son that then had been born to them, two hundred and eleven dollars in cash. Today he is rated as one of the substantial commercial figures of this section of the state. It is thus that he has no occasion to regret the choice that brought him toCalifornia twenty years ago. Stone service enters into many of the most substantial buildings erected in this region during the period in which he has been in business here, this service including the installation of the plumbing in the fine new Union high school in Porterville; the Elks building in that city; the tuberculosis hospital in Springville; numerous school-houses in this district; and many business blocks and private residences, the dependable quality of this service being widely recognized hereabout.

It was on April 20, 1907, in Toledo, that Fred W. Stone was united in marriage to Miss Alice M. Burnep of that city and they have four children: The son, Frederick E. Stone, born in Fresno; and three daughters Margaret Ann, Helen M. and Mary Alice, born in Porterville. The Stones are democrats and Mr. Stone is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and he is a veteran of the Spanish-American War. Mr. Stone is the owner of large realty interests in Porterville.

ANTHON G HEERMAN

Anthon G. Heerman, postmaster at Dinuba and for years one of the active and influential factors in the general commercial life of that flourishing little city; a veteran of the World war with an overseas record; and a prominent figure in the general social life of the community, has been a resident of California since the days of his childhood. He was born on a farm in York county, in southeastern Nebraska,May 14, 1889, and was but thirteen years of age when in 1902 he came to this state with his parents, the family settling in Modesta. From that place they moved to Fresno county, living for a while in Kingsburg and then in Selma, and it was thus that he acquired his early education in three different schools those of Modesta, Kingsburg and Selma.

As a lad Anthon G. Heerman took a particular interest in commercial forms, in which he had some special training. He then became a clerk in the First National Bank of Kingsburg and after a while transferred his services to the Bank of Coalinga in Coalinga, also in Fresno county. From that employment he presently was transferred to the offices of the Wells Fargo National Bank at San Francisco and in 1915 left that bank to become a clerk in the First National Bank of Dinuba, and was thus serving this latter bank when in 1917 America became engaged in war and called on the services of its young men in that behalf. Mr. Heerman got into the army and after a period of intensive training at Camp Kearney was assigned to the One Hundred and Forty-third Artillery and with that command was sent overseas in August, 1918, and became a unit in the Fortieth Division of the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe. Though he thus got on the scene a bit too late for much active service at the front Mr. Heerman had some right interesting experiences in his service in the field and has some mighty good stories to tell in that connection.

Mr. Heerman received his discharge from the army on January 24, 1919, and upon the completion of his military service returned to Dinuba and resumed his place in the office of the First National Bank of that city. Not long afterward he went into the mercantile business in Dinuba, a member of the firm of Loges & Heerman, clothing merchants, and was thus associated until in 1924, when he sold his interest in the store to his partner and took the civil service examination for eligibility to serve as postmaster. In April, 1924, Mr. Heerman was appointed postmaster and is now serving the community in that important public capacity. Mr. Heerman was one of the organizers of Alta Post No. 19, American Legion, in Dinuba, is a past commander of that post and a member of its board of directors. He also is a charter member of the locally influential Lions Club, in the affairs of which he takes a warm interest, and is a member of Dinuba Lodge No. 385, F. & A. M.

E W STEWART

E. W. Stewart, manager of the Benham Ice Cream Company in Visalia,California, was born on a farm in Missouri, March 21, 1886, and is a son of William and Mary E. (Snyder) Stewart. He was educated in the public and high schools of his native state and began his business career as clerk in a hotel, where he was employed for four years. In 1912 he came to California, locating in Long Beach. During the next six years he was employed in various places and occupations. In 1918 he accepted a position with the Benham Ice Cream Company in Fresno, where he remained until February, 1921, when the Visalia branch was established and he was placed in charge as manager.

When Mr. Stewart first assumed the management of this branch two small trucks were employed to supply a rather limited trade. With characteristic energy he started in to build up the business. He succeeded so well that in 1924 five large trucks were necessary to accommodate an ever-increasing trade, extending over all that part of the state between Goshen and Bakersfield. While thus building up the business of his company, Mr. Stewart has shown himself to be a man of enterprise and public spirit, ready to support any movement for the general improvement of Visalia and contiguous territory. He is now (1924) erecting an addition to the plant, making it large enough to take care of not only the present trade, but also large enough to allow for further expansion.

Mr. Stewart married Miss Nancy Tyler of Missouri, and they have two interesting children: Sadie Belle and George William. Mr. Stewart is inclined to be independent in his political views, placing principles and good men above mere party considerations, especially in the choice of local officials. He is a member of the Loyal Order of Moose, but finds his greatest enjoyment in his home and family.

JOSEPH MITCHELL

To be a successful hotel man means that one possesses certain qualities that are not specifically required in any other calling. That Joseph Mitchell, vice president and manager of the California Hot Springs, is particularly qualified for his present position is generally acknowledged by all who are conversant with his record here. He is a native son of Tulare county, born in Visalia, on the 25th day of October, 1867, the son of Levi and Anna Mitchell, the former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Germany. Levi Mitchell was one of the first merchants in Visalia, having come here in the early '60s. Later he became the pioneer merchant at White River, and also ran a hotel there until his death, which occurred in 1884.

Joseph Mitchell obtained his education in the public schools and upon the death of his father he and his brother Michael continued the operation of the store and hotel at White River until 1910, when they sold out. In 1904 Mr. Mitchell had bought an interest in the Hot Springs and after relinquishing the business at White River he came here and from that time to the present has devoted himself wholly to that enterprise, having been chosen vice president and manager in 1910. This is one of the most popular resorts of its special character in the San Joaquin valley and a large part of its popularity has been directly due to the indefatigable efforts of its manager. A keen judge of human nature, genial and accommodating, painstaking in looking after the comfort of his guests, he has proven a popular host, as evidenced by the fact that many patrons of the place return year after year.

Mr. Mitchell is a member of the Masonic fraternity, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, while his wife, who was formerly Miss Elizabeth James of Michigan, is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star. They own a commodious and attractive home in Hot Springs and are popular members of the social circles in which they move.

JOSEPH ACURSO JR

On July 24, 1882, Joseph Acurso, Jr., who is now the proprietor of the Pacific Coast Grocery at No. 400 East Tulare avenue, Visalia,California, was born in Italy. While he was still a small boy his parents, Joseph and Frances A. Acurso, came to the United States and settled in Louisiana. There the father was engaged in the grocery business for a time, when they removed to Chicago and lived there for four years. They then came to California and located in San Jose, where they lived for one year, when they removed to San Francisco.

Joseph Acurso, Jr., was educated in the public schools in the various cities where his parents lived. In 1906 he left San Francisco and returned to San Jose, remaining there until 1911, when he became a resident of Visalia. On the last day of April, 1914, he opened his present grocery. At that time there were but few families living in the vicinity. But he had faith in the future of Tulare avenue and the adjoining streets and that faith has been fully justified. With the building up of this section of Visalia his trade has grown and he has added a stock of general merchandise. He built and owns the two-story structure in which he conducts his business, and he is also the owner of other valuable property, all acquired by his industry and strict attention to business.

Mr. Acurso was married to Miss Lucy Albanese and they have two children Frances and Louis. Mr. Acurso is a naturalized American citizen and claims allegiance to the republican party. In local affairs, however, he frequently "scratches the ticket" to vote for the man rather than the party. He is a member of the Loyal Order of Moose, which is the only fraternal society to claim him as a brother.

GUY W SMITH

Guy W. Smith, the Visalia representative of the Prune and Apricot Growers Association, has had a somewhat varied and interesting career. He was born in Plattsmouth, Nebraska, August 10, 1871. While he was still in his childhood his parents, George S. and Annie (Whitman) Smith, removed to the city of Omaha. In 1896 they came to California and located in Colusa. A little later they removed to Pacific Grove and from there went to San Jose. The father had been admitted to the bar in Nebraska, but never practiced his profession after coming to California. The mother is still living, but the father died some years ago.

After attending the public schools of his native state, Guy W. Smith entered the Cotner University, where he was graduated in 1894. He was then for eight years in the ministry of the Christian church. In that time he held pastorates in Colorado, and at Colusa, Pacific Grove, Woodland and Oakland,California. While engaged in the ministry he studied law and in 1903 was admitted to the bar. He at once entered upon the practice of law, which he followed for four years, when he located in Santa Clara county and during the next twelve years was employed in raising prunes. Shortly after the Prune and Apricot Association was formed he became a member and in 1924 he was the oldest male employe of the organization, and only two women had been with it for a greater length of time. He established the company in Visalia and became a resident of that city. A new warehouse was built in 1920, where the company packs and ships some of the finest prunes grown in the great California fruit belt.

Mr. Smith married Miss Grace B. Belknap, a native of Oregon, and they have four children: Guy W., Jr., Robert, Whitman and Burton. The oldest son served in the United States army during the World War. Mr. Smith is a firm believer in the political principles advocated by the republican party and while a resident of Santa Clara county he was three times elected to the state legislature.

Although Mr. Smith was reasonably successful as a clergyman and as a practicing attorney, he finds more real satisfaction in gardening and fruit culture. As superintendent of the Prune and Apricot Growers business in Visalia he has encouraged the planting of orchards and the improvement in the quality of the fruit offered for shipment. By his timely suggestions and advice to fruit growers he has proved to be a valuable asset to the industry.

MRS OLIVE B LAWLER

One of the incidental functions of this publication is to take recognition of those citizens of Tulare county who stand distinctively representative in their chosen spheres of endeavor, and in this connection there is eminent propriety in according specific consideration to Mrs. Olive B. Lawler, special agent of the New York Life Insurance Company in Tulare. Though devoting her efforts in a line of endeavor entered by few women, she has abundantly proven her thorough qualification for her vocation and is today numbered among the leaders in local business circles. She was born on a farm in Pettis county, Missouri, the daughter of N. B. and Elizabeth (Scott) Ray. N. B. Ray followed farming and stock raising all his life and in 1892 came to California, locating near Tulare, where he is now living, though retired from active work.

Olive B. Ray was reared on the paternal farmstead and secured a good practical common school education, which she supplemented by attendance at normal school. Later she became the wife of J. T. Lawler, whose death occurred in 1914. She had been for twelve years in charge of the millinery departments in Leggett's three department stores, and, after her marriage, assisted her husband, who was in the gents furnishings business in Tulare. After his death she went into the millinery business on her own account, but during the past seven years she has been connected with the New York Life Insurance Company as special agent. Energetic, tactful, and with a thorough knowledge of the intricacies of insurance, she has been much more than ordinarily successful in her work and stands high on the roll of her company's representatives.

Mrs. Lawler does not permit this business to monopolize all her interests, for she takes a part in many local activities and is a popular member of the various circles in which she moves. Possessing a marked artistic taste and a talent for designing, she has made a life study of interior decorating and in this subject is considered an authority. She possesses a charming and attractive personality and wields a definite influence for good in the community, supporting unreservedly every movement for the public welfare. Politically she gives her support to the republican party, is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star and of the Tulare Board of Trade.

Mr. Lawler was a very prominent man and belonged to the Masonic fraternity, the Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Eagles, the Red Men and the Foresters. To Mr. and Mrs. Lawler were born two children, namely: Reva, who is now the wife of Howard Estes of San Francisco; and Doris Z., who is private secretary in the office of the West Coast Life Insurance Company.

ANTONE GOMES

Antone Gomes, proprietor of the well established commercial transfer line operating under his name in Porterville, and one of the most widely experienced men in that line in this section of the state, has for years been a resident of Porterville and has a wide acquaintance through out this section. He was born in the state of Idaho, December 10, 1883, and was but a child when his parents, D. J. and Isabel Gomes, came to California with their family and settled in Placer county, where D. J. Gomes became engaged in railroad work.

It was thus that, though born in Idaho, Antone Gomes was reared in California. By reason of changes of residence due to his father's vocational experiences he had his schooling in various towns of the state and early became interested in fruit culture, his occupation as a young man having to do with the operation of orchards. He then spent a year working in the quarries and while thus engaged became interested in the carpenter trade, which he set about to learn. He developed into an experienced workman and while working at this trade became a resident of Porterville. That was in 1910, and he ever since has made his home in this city, where for some time after taking up his residence he followed his trade as a carpenter. Later he went into business in the transfer line in association with J. R. Moore. For three years this association of business interests continued and then Mr. Gomes started in business on his own account, setting up a transfer establishment on Main street, and has since been thus engaged, having developed a fine business. Mr. Gomes has a well equipped plant and with a fleet of five trucks and a force of eight to ten men is prepared to handle anything in the transfer line within the trade area in which he is operating.

In 1918, in Porterville, Mr. Gomes was united in marriage to Mrs. Maud Adlesbach, who has children by her former marriage, and they have a pleasant home in Porterville. Mr. Gomes takes a proper interest in the general affairs of the community in which he has long resided and is a member of the local lodge of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

ALVA B SELLARS

Alva B. Sellars, well known and well established realtor in Exeter, makes no secret of the fact that the interest created in his mind by a view of the Tulare county exhibit at the Seattle exposition nearly fifteen years ago was the main cause of his location here not long afterward, and it is but proper to say that he also makes no secret of the fact that he never has had occasion to regret the happy chance which thus directed his feet. Alva B. Sellars is a native of the Badger state, born in Bloom City, Richland county, in southwestern Wisconsin, October 10, 1873, a son of Jonas M. and Elnora (Downs) Sellars, both members of pioneer families in that state. The late J. M. Sellars was a miller by vocation and was for some years engaged in milling in Wisconsin. He then went to Red Cloud, Nebraska, where he was a miller and where he remained until his retirement and removal to Boulder,Colorado, in which latter city his last days were spent.

By reason of his father's change of location, Alva B. Sellars acquired part of his early education in Wisconsin and then finished his schooling in Red Cloud, Nebraska, supplementing this by a course in a business college. As a young man he became interested in the realty business, a line to which he thus has long been devoted. He became actively engaged in the real estate business in Red Cloud and was there making his home when in 1909 he made a trip to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition at Seattle, in the state of Washington. As noted above, it was there that Mr. Sellars became greatly attracted to the comprehensive exhibit of the resources of Tulare county on display at that exposition and was convinced that a county that could produce such a variety of products as were there displayed must be a mightly good place in which to live. After his return to Red Cloud this thought persisted and he came to be more and more of the opinion that Tulare county was the place for him. After a bit of further investigation Mr. Sellars closed out his holdings in Nebraska and in 1911 came to Tulare county and became established in business in the realty line in Exeter, where he ever since has been located and where he has done very well, long having been recognized as one of the leading realtors in this wonderful valley. He owns a twenty-two-acre vineyard.

On May 15, 1900, in Red Cloud, Nebraska, Alva B. Sellars was united in marriage to Miss Susie Kenady, who was born in Quincy, Illinois, daughter of W. P. Kenady. Mr. and Mrs. Sellars have two daughters: Hazel and Helen, both of whom are now finishing their special schooling in music with a view to becoming teachers of music. Both young ladies were graduated from the Exeter high school and have ever displayed marked talents along musical lines. Miss Hazel Sellars is a student at the southern branch of the University of California at Los Angeles and Miss Helen Sellars is attending the College of the Pacific at Stockton, both majoring in music. The Sellars family have a very pleasant home in Exeter and have ever taken an interested and helpful part in the general social and cultural activities of the community. Mr. Sellars has taken a good citizen's part in general civic affairs and for some time rendered efficient public service as secretary of the Exeter Union high school board. He is a Knights Templar Mason and has rendered secretarial service in behalf of the local Masonic bodies. He also is an active member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is likewise affiliated with the Woodmen of the World.

FRANK W GOBLE

Among the most essential and most highly appreciated professions is that of undertaker, or funeral director, and one of the most expert and successful in this line in Tulare county, as well as one of the oldest in point of service, is Frank W. Goble. He is a native of Tulare county, born on a farm north of Tulare, on the 13th day of June, 1877, a son of John A. and Martha (Johnson) Goble, the former of whom is deceased. His widow now makes her home in Los Angeles. John A. Goble was a pioneer in this locality, first coming to California from the east in 1874 and locating in Visalia. Afterward he homesteaded a tract of land on Deer creek, but eventually came to Tulare, where he became prominently identified with business and banking circles. In his early days here he was employed by Cess & Wallace, but later became connected with the old Tulare Bank and afterward with the First National Bank of Tulare. In various ways he became an influential factor in the affairs of these communities. The pioneer element still further was represented in Mr. Goble's family from the fact that his grandfather was one of the early physicians in this section of the country.

Frank W. Goble received his educational training in the common and high schools of this locality, upon the completion of which he went to Ohio and there learned the art and practice of undertaking. Returning then to Tulare, he became associated with Mr. Carruthers, who had long been established in the undertaking business here. Upon the latter's death Mr. Goble bought the business, which he has conducted to the present time. He is thoroughly up to date in all his methods and appliances and, because of his skill, courtesy and thoughtfulness in the discharge of his professional duties, he has earned the confidence and goodwill of the community and enjoys his full share of the public patronage.

Mr. Goble was married to Miss Maye A. Sutherlin, who has lived her entire life in this locality, and they are the parents of four children: John A., Thomas, William and Betty Maye. Politically Mr. Goble gives his support to the democratic party and takes a deep interest in the trend of public affairs. Fraternally he is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Lions. Personally Mr. Goble is deservedly popular, for he possesses to a marked degree those qualities which make for friendships. He is essentially public-spirited and gives earnest support to every movement which promises to advance the general welfare of the community.

ROBERT M SEAMANS

For more than half a century the name of Seamans has been interwoven with the affairs and development of Shasta county, California. The paternal grandfather of Robert M. Seamans made the voyage around Cape Horn and landed in San Francisco on Christmas Day in 1848. His son, George Seamans, was born in Shasta county, near the mining district known as the "Old Diggings." There he grew to manhood and followed the vocation of gold miner practically all his life. His death occurred on May 9, 1906. Another pioneer family of Shasta county was the Mitchell family, which crossed the plains and settled near Millville. George Seamans was married to Roberta Mitchell and Robert M. is son of this worthy couple.

Robert M. Seamans was born in Old Diggings, Shasta county, California, January 12, 1893. After attending the public schools in his native county, he began his business career as clerk in a grocery store, where he was employed for two years. He then obtained a position as express messenger with the Wells Fargo Express Company when only sixteen years of age. During the three years he was with the Wells Fargo Company he attended night school in Sacramento. He was then with the firm of Crane Company as assistant purchasing agent until 1914, when he decided to move nearer to the coast.

Mr. Seamans was with the Pacific Gas & Electric Company at San Rafael for about a year, at the end of which time he returned to Sacramento and was in the automobile business there and in San Francisco until the fall of 1917. On December 3, 1917, he enlisted in the United States army as a musician in the Sixty-second Infantry Band. He remained in the army until February 19, 1919, but his command was not sent to Europe to participate in the great World War. Upon being discharged from military service he reentered the automobile business and was with the Pierce Arrow Motor Car Company in San Francisco and Los Angeles, later being sent to Fresno.

On April 1, 1920, Mr. Seamans came to Visalia and just thirteen months later May 1, 1921 he joined the Automobile Club of, Southern California. The next nine months he spent as a salesman in Dinuba, when he returned to Visalia and took charge of the club's interest at that place, where he has since been located.

On July 24, 1921, Mr. Seamans was married to Miss Nora Polly, who was born and reared in Tulare county. They have a daughter, whose name is June.

Mr. Seamans is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and takes an interest in the work of that order. He is a member of the American Legion, the patriotic society composed of those who served in the United States army and navy at the time of the World War, and is also a member of the Kiwanis Club of Visalia and a willing helper of every movement. calculated to advance the interests of the community in which he resides. His political affiliations are with the republican party, though he is not an active political worker.

JOHN A MACRAE

Standing in the community in the dual capacity of merchant and newspaper man, John A. MacRae exerts a large and potent influence on the life and activities of the cities of Cutler and Orosi, Tulare County. Mr. MacRae is a native of Chippewa county, Wisconsin, and is the son of Hugh and Anna (Campbell) MacRae. These parents were of Canada and the father for many years followed the vocation of lumberman.

After attending the public schools, John A. MacRae obtained, employment as a clerk in stores, which he continued for some time, but eventually became a printer's devil. Until the year 1918 he was employed in Stores in Rochester, Minnesota, and various towns in northern Idaho. In December, 1918, he came to Tulare county and became manager of Neeley's dry goods store in Dinuba. In 1920 he came to Cutler and bought out Rasmussen & Sons' general merchandise store, which he conducted as such until 1924, when he made a complete transformation of the business and changed it into a self-serve grocery store. In this latter enterprise he has met with success far beyond his anticipations and has abundantly demonstrated the practicability of such an institution.

In addition to his mercantile interests, in 1925 Mr. MacRae became manager and editor of the Orosi-Cutler Courier. This is a well edited and attractive newspaper, gives all the news while it is news and is not only a good news purveyor and a fine advertising medium, but it also is a potent factor in the support of every enterprise tending to better the welfare of the communities it represents.

Mr. MacRae was married to Miss Laura Ulrich, a native of Wisconsin, and they have a daughter: Katherine Gladys, who is a graduate of the University of Idaho, a member of the Kappa Kappa Gamma and of the Eastern Star, and is now private secretary to Fred B. Fox of Fresno. Mrs. MacRae also belongs to the Order of the Eastern Star. Mr. MacRae belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken all the degrees of the York Rite, having served as secretary of the chapter of Royal Arch Masons and as recorder of the commandery of Knights Templar; he is also a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, and belongs to the Order of the Eastern Star and the Sciots, being chairman of Cutler-Orosi district in the latter order.

GEORGE THUT

George Thut, one of the leading merchant tailors of Visalia ,California, was born in Switzerland, August 19, 1882. While he was still in his early childhood his parents, Rudolph and Elizabeth Thut, came to the United States and settled in Kern county, California. After a short residence there they removed to Tulare county. Rudolph Thut was a farmer and followed that occupation all his life. Both parents are deceased.

George Thut received his education in the public schools of Kern and Tulare counties. While still in his teens he was apprenticed to a tailor. He learned all the details of making clothes and in 1907 opened a shop of his own in Visalia. He is now located at No. 111 South Church street, employs four journeymen tailors, and claims the distinction of having been longer in business than any other tailoring establishment in Visalia. All the work is done in his own shop and among his patrons are many of the best dressed men in the city. 

Mr. Thut married Miss Nina Jarrett, who was born in the state of Maine, but grew to womanhood in California. They have two children: Mervin and Richard. Politically Mr. Thut gives his allegiance to the republican party, and fraternally he belongs to the Foresters and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

TIMOTHY E MURRAY

Timothy E. Murray, until recently of the well established undertaking firm of Murdock & Murray of Tulare, morticians and funeral directors, an accredited embalmer and a man of large experience in his profession, is a native of California, a member of one of the pioneer families of this state, and has lived in California all his life, a resident of Tulare county long enough to be thoroughly acquainted with general conditions here. He was born in the city of San Rafael, Marin county, August 8, 1885, a son of Michael and Annie (Nagel) Murray, the latter of whom came to this state with her parents in pioneer days, the Nagel family crossing the plains by wagon train and settling in Marin county. The late Michael Murray, who was for forty-five years in the livery business in San Rafael, and who thus became one of the best known men in that section of the state, was one of California's '49ers, having come here during the first year of the memorable gold rush. He was for some time engaged in mining in this state and in Idaho before settling down in San Rafael, where he lived to be past ninety years of age. His wife lives in San Rafael. Several of the daughters of this pioneer couple became teachers in the schools of California and another daughter is a nun in St. Joseph's convent at San Francisco and stationed at Star of the Sea parish.

Reared in San Rafael, Timothy E. Murray attended the schools of that city and as a young man was for some years associated with his father in the latter's livery stable business. For two or three years while thus engaged he rendered public service as deputy coroner in and for Marin county. While in the livery business Mr. Murray naturally came into charge of the vehicular arrangement of many a funeral cortege and gradually found himself attracted to the undertaking business, his experience gaining for him a thorough acquaintance with the exacting details of the funeral director's important calling. On June 1, 1916, he was licensed as an accredited embalmer in the state of California. Thus equipped for the practice of his profession Mr. Murray became employed as the embalmer on the staff of an undertaking firm in Stockton and presently was made manager of one of the establishments of a large undertaking firm in San Francisco.

In August, 1922, Mr. Murray came to Tulare county and set himself up in business as a mortician in Visalia and was thus occupied there for eight months, at the end of which time he sold that establishment to advantage and then became junior partner in the firm of Murdock & Murray, and from that time until he sold out on August 15, 1925, he was in business in Tulare, his partner being James Murdock, also an experienced funeral director. This firm had a well equipped and up-to-date establishment on Kern and H streets, with a modern equipment and admirably appointed chapel and display rooms, and in its vehicular equipment was included the only invalid car in Tulare county. Mr. Murray's wife, who has had much experience in her line, was the lady attendant at these funeral parlors. Mr. Murray will remain in Tulare for a time before locating again.

Mrs. Murray, who before her marriage was Lena Marcellin, is a native daughter of California, born in the city of Stockton, and she and Mr. Murray were married there in 1917. They are members of the Roman Catholic church and are republicans. Mr. Murray is a member of the Tulare Rotary Club and is affiliated with the local council of the Knights of Columbus and with the Woodmen of the World.

FRANK H WILSON

Frank H. Wilson, who during the past three decades has rendered excellent service to the state in the promotion of its wonderful orchard and vineyard industries, is president of the First National Bank of Dinuba and one of the best known and most substantial citizens of Tulare county, and he has been for thirty years and more one of the real leaders in this amazing development work. Though not a native of California, Mr. Wilson had the foresight to cast in his lot with that of the people of California when he had attained his majority and his energetic efforts ever since have been intelligently and systematically directed in behalf of the industry which he early recognized as the coming foundation of the state's substantial development. It was thirty-five years ago that Mr. Wilson began the development of the great nursery interests with which his name so long was associated and in his efforts in that behalf he established for himself a name that now is inseparably connected with the horticultural industries of the state. Though his banking and other interests now claim much of his time, he continues his connection with the interests he did so much to develop and as the vice president of the Sun Maid Raisin Growers Association of California and a director of the Peach and Fig Growers Association, of which latter organization he long was president, he keeps in close touch with present development work along those lines and is still accounted one of the leaders in the great fruit industry in this state.

Frank H. Wilson is a Canadian by birth, born near the city of Toronto, the capital of the province of Ontario, December 9, 1866, and was reared in his native place, receiving there excellent schooling and a careful rearing. Mr. Wilson remained in Canada until the year in which he attained his majority when, in 1887, he came to California and became a resident of Stockton. There he became acquainted with the promising horticultural development of the state, in which he began to take an intelligent and inquiring interest. In 1890, in Fresno, he engaged in the nursery business, which he gradually worked up to a standard which in time brought him recognition as one of the real leaders in that enterprising group of horticulturists who since have done such a notable work. Mr. Wilson has gradually extended his acreage and is known as one of the large growers of the state. For some time Mr. Wilson served as president of the Peach and Fig Growers Association and retained a place on the board of directors of that influential body until 1925. As noted above, he served as the vice president of the Sun Maid Raisin Growers Association of California until 1924, and continues to exercise an influence in the perpetuation of those two important agencies for the development of the horticultural interests of the state.

Mr. Wilson has been a resident of Dinuba since 1900 and he and his family are very pleasantly and very comfortably situated there. In 1905 he was elected president of the Bank of Dinuba (now the First National Bank of Dinuba) and retained that executive position until his resignation in 1910 in order that he might give attention to his personal affairs. In 1924 he was again elected president of the First National Bank of Dinuba, and is now serving in that capacity. The First National Bank of Dinuba had its beginning in 1902 as the Bank of Dinuba, starting with a capitalization of twenty-five thousand dollars. In 1908 it secured a charter as a national bank and has since been operating as the First National Bank of Dinuba, with a present capitalization of two hundred thousand dollars, resources in excess of two million dollars and a surplus of forty thousand dollars. Twice this bank has doubled its capitalization out of its earnings and its stockholders receive eight per cent in dividends. The present officiary of this bank is as follows: President, Frank H. Wilson; vice president, Karl R. Lewis; cashier, Harry L. Andrews and directors (besides the above), W. B. Nichols, J. H. Newman, L. A. Campbell, G. W. Osterhout, E. Barris, L. E. Seligman and William Wyman.

On March 1, 1895, in Fresno, Frank H. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Emily Marie Templeman, who was born in England, and they have three children: A son, Frank H. Wilson, Jr.; and two daughters Florence Marie and Catherine. Not only has Mr. Wilson been diligent in his own business but he has ever found time to give a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs and has rendered public service as a member of the  board of trustees of the city of Dinuba and as a member of the local board of education, in the former capacity having served for several years during a period when the developing city was beginning to solve some of its most important municipal problems. He is a republican in politics. Mr. Wilson is a charter member of the locally influential Dinuba Rotary Club and is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with the consistory in Fresno and with IslamTemple in San Francisco. He also belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks in Fresno.

JAMES WILLARD NICHOLSON, M D

Dr. James Willard Nicholson, who for the past ten years and more has been engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Porterville, one of the best known physicians in Tulare county, is a native son of the old Empire state but has been a resident of California since the days of his boyhood and is thus as thoroughly familiar with conditions in this state as though indeed "native and to the manner born", as the poet would say.

He was born March 13, 1887, in the pleasant village of Madison, in the county of that name in the central part of New York, and bordering the beautiful valley of the Mohawk, and is a son of Dr. A. R. and Mary (Taylor) Nicholson, both members of old families in New York state, the latter of whom died in 1894. In the next year (1895) Dr. A. R. Nicholson closed out his affairs in New York and with his family came to California and became engaged in practice in Fresno, where he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in December, 1921.

By a comparison of above dates it will be observed that James Willard Nicholson was but seven years of age when death bereft him of his mother and was eight years of age when in the following year he came to California with his father and became a resident of Fresno. He finished his local schooling in the Fresno high school, from which he was graduated in 1906, meanwhile having begun seriously the study of medicine. Under his father's thoughtful preceptorship he was prepared for college and then entered the medical college of Vanderbilt University at Nashville, Tennessee, from which admirable institution he was graduated with the degree of M. D. in 1913.

Upon receiving his diploma Dr. Nicholson returned to Fresno and was there engaged in practice until 1915, when he established himself in practice at Porterville and has since been located there, with present offices at No. 330 Main street, and his residence at No. 626 Putnam street, and is doing very well. In addition to his extensive general practice Dr. Nicholson is retained as company physician for the Standard Oil Company and for the San Joaquin Light & Power Company and has a wide acquaintance throughout this section of the state.

On April 24, 1914, in Fresno, Dr. James W. Nicholson was united in marriage to Miss Ann Collins of that place, a native daughter of California, and they have two children: Jean and James. Dr. and Mrs. Nicholson are republicans and take a proper and helpful interest in the general civic affairs of the community as well as in its general social and cultural activities. The Doctor is a member of the locally influential Lions Club of Porterville and is also affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Dr. Nicholson owns 60 acres of raisin grapes in Fresno county, in the Del Rey district, all improved.

WILLIAM H RICHARDS

On January 6, 1896, William H. Richards was born in Paris, Texas, a son of L. N. and Lilla (Dugger) Richards. While he was still in his early childhood his parents removed to the state of Washington. After a brief residence there they went to Oregon and in 1906 they came to California, locating in Exeter,Tulare county. There the father entered the real estate business. Both parents are still living.

William H. Richards was educated in the public schools and was a member of the graduating class of 1917 in the Exeter high school. At that time there was a demand for automobile mechanics and he started in to master the intricacies of the motor car. A little later he went on a ranch, where he worked one year and then returned to the automobile business with C. M. Burnett of Tulare, as agents for the Hudson and Essex cars. A year later he took the agency for the Paige and Jewett cars in Exeter. In 1921 he located  in Visalia, where he continued to handle the Paige and Jewett cars for a time, when in 1923 he obtained the agency for the Chandler and Cleveland cars for Tulare county, and established his headquarters at Campbell's garage.

Mr. Richards married Miss Veda L. Brundage, a daughter of 0. G. Brundage of Farmersville. Mr. and Mrs. Richards have a family of three interesting children Veda Lucille, William H., Jr., and Alice Mae. Mr. Richards is regarded as a member of the democratic party, but in local politics he is likely to vote for some candidate on the opposition ticket if he considers such candidate better fitted for the office. His fraternal affiliations are with Visalia Lodge, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

JAMES R MOORE

James R. Moore, proprietor of Moore's Transfer in Porterviile and one of the best known men in that city, has been a resident of California since the days of his young manhood and is thoroughly familiar with conditions here. He was born on a farm in the state of Tennessee on December 4, 1887, and was there reared, finishing his education in the high school at Peakland. Until he had attained his majority Mr. Moore remained on the home farm, helpful in the labors of its development, and then, in 1906, came to California "to look around a bit." He was so well pleased with the condition of things here that he went back home, closed out his affairs there and straightway returned to this state, which ever since has been his place of residence and in which he is quite content to spend the remainder of his days.

For three years following his arrival in this state Mr. Moore worked in the oil fields and then he became the manager of a ranch in the Woodville neighborhood in Tulare county. For another three years he was thus engaged and then he became connected with the operation of a transfer company in Porterville and in that connection thoroughly familiarized himself with the details of the transfer business as related to this trade area. In 1917 Mr. Moore went into the transfer business in Porterville on his own account and since that time has built up a business that makes him one of the leaders in his line in this county. Beginning in a modest way in 1917, with one light motor truck and a couple of teams, he gave such close attention to the service that it soon became necessary to increase his facilities and these facilities since have been increased to meet the growing demand for Moore service, until now he is operating several large motor trucks and has created an establishment that is one of the distinctive business concerns of the town. Mr. Moore is prepared to undertake any sort of transfer engagement within his territory and his trucks are called on to travel far and wide. He has an admirably equipped place on West Olive street, a thoroughly up-to-date establishment.

On July 5, 1906, in Athens,Tennessee, James R. Moore was united in marriage to Miss Maggie L.Peak, who also was born in Tennessee, and they have one child: A son, Rodgers Lee Moore. Mr. and Mrs. Moore are democrats and Mr. Moore is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Knights of Pythias and of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

BERT L HUGHES

In 1857 Edward P. Hughes made the journey across the plains and began mining in the Sonoma district. Later he located at Copperopolis and from there he went to Stockton. He married Miss Elizabeth C. Smith, a daughter of James C. Smith, who had settled north of Stockton, and whose land is now occupied by the College of the Pacific. After his marriage Mr. Hughes located on a farm in Fresno county in 1880, and there engaged in farming and grape culture. In 1912 he was struck by an automobile and received injuries which resulted in his death. His widow is still living.

Bert L. Hughes, a son of this couple, was born in Stockton, California, January 20, 1867. He was educated in the public schools and in a private school in Fresno he began studying for the profession of accountant, which has been his occupation throughout his business career. After leaving school he further qualified himself by working under competent bookkeepers and through the experience gained in actual work. He began work as an accountant when he was eighteen years old and located in Visalia in March, 1888. Since that time with the exception of four years  he has been a resident of Tulare county. From 1900 to 1919 he was secretary of the W. R. Spalding Lumber Company. He then became the head of the Bert L. Hughes Auditing Company, with offices in the Bank of Italy building. This company audits books, or opens new ones for firms and corporations. Mr. Hughes holds a certificate authorizing him to practice his profession under the auspices of the treasury department of the United States, and he specializes on income tax reports, in which he is universally recognized as an expert.

About the time he located in Visalia Mr. Hughes was married to Miss Elba E. Garrison, daughter of Samuel Garrison, who was editor of a democratic newspaper in Visalia during the Civil war and later judge of the District court. Mr. and Mrs. Hughes became parents of nine children: Louise Hortense, who died in 1923; Marjorie V., now Mrs. Gibbs, residing in Strathmore; Mildred K., now Mrs. Schwab ; Malvern E., a draftsman with the Great Western Electric Company; Constance H., now Mrs. Hubbard of Virginia; Carroll E., now Mrs. Lotito; Katherine, now Mrs. Hippell of Visalia; Barbara; and Garrison. Mr. and Mrs. Hughes have fourteen grandchildren. Mr. Hughes is a democrat and has held several positions as deputy in the county offices. He is secretary of the Rotary Club and holds membership in the Knights of Pythias, the Elks and the Woodmen of the World. He finds his recreation in hunting, fishing and witnessing baseball games.

CALIFORNIA HOT SPRINGS

One of the most famous and deservedly popular health resorts in California today is the California Hot Springs, located in the southern part of Tulare county, thirty-five miles southeast of Porterville and twenty-seven miles east of Ducor. It is an ideal summer and winter resort for those in quest of rest and health, as well as those who merely wish to spend their vacations in the open, amid the invigorating air of the Sierras. California Hot Springs was first utilized commercially as a health resort by T. J. and N. B. Witt, who operated the place until some time in the '80s, when they sold their interest to Firebaugh, Pike & Wingrove. In 1901 Dr. Bernhard bought the interests of Messrs. Firebaugh and Pike and he and Mr. Wingrove operated it until the death of the Doctor in 1904. At that time S. Mitchell and J. H. Williams bought the Bernhard interest. Joseph Mitchell, who owned the hotel, transferred it to the corporation and became a stockholder in the company, of which Mr. Williams became president, which position he held up to the time of his death in 1910. Since then his widow, Mrs. E. H. Williams, has served as president, with the other offices filled as follows: Vice president and manager, Joseph Mitchell; secretary, L. S. Wingrove; treasurer, S. Mitchell. The tract under control of this company comprises three hundred and twenty acres, most beautifully situated just along the western boundary of the famous Sequoia national forest, surrounded by mountains and forests, the snow-capped peaks rising to eight thousand feet. Easily accessible by fine roads from any point in the state, at an altitude which is just right for both winter and summer, this resort has gained a reputation which goes far beyond the boundaries of California indeed, people from foreign lands have come here for the healing benefit of the wonderful springs. A chemical analysis of the waters has shown them to have remarkable medicinal and curative properties, especially for those suffering from rheumatism, neuralgia, malaria, and similar complaints. All sort of amusements, such as golf, swimming, horseback riding, fishing, tennis, mountain climbing and dancing are provided, so that no one need feel the lack of entertainment while here.

The baths, which are under the personal supervision of a resident physician, consist of a plunge, and modern steel and concrete bath-houses with rooms for men and women, equipped with shower and tub baths. An ice plant and a modern laundry are also maintained for the benefit of the guests, and a general store is kept open for those who desire supplies. California Hot Springs is a government post office and long distance telephone lines connect the Springs with the mountains and outside points. The one hundred cottages on the grounds are equipped with running water, electric lights and toilets, and many of them with private baths, while the health of the entire community is doubly assured by a perfect sewage disposal system. All in all, no place offers more attractive inducements to a person who desires to combine health-seeking with pleasure, and the fact that the popularity of the California Hot Springs has steadily increased year after year is the best evidence of its merits.

HIRAM HAROLD HILL

Among the pioneers of Tulare county, California, was a family named Hill, who located near the place known as Mineral King. A son of this pioneer was educated for the ministry and became the Rev. F. E. Hill, well known in church work throughout the San Joaquin valley, his first pastorate being in Visalia. This young clergyman married Miss Lilly Beverton and Hiram Harold Hill is their son. The mother died while Hiram was yet in his childhood. The father is still active as a minister of the Gospel.

Hiram Harold Hill was born in Monrovia, California, January 4, 1890. He attended the public schools until he won the consent of his father to let him leave school and engage in some useful occupation. His first job was on a ranch, in which line of work he continued for four years. For the next eleven years he was employed by a railroad company, part of the time as a machinist's helper in the company's shops and part of the time with a logging gang in the mountains. Upon severing his connection with the railroad company he went to Exeter, where for a year he was employed by a laundry. He was then for six years with the Visalia Star Laundry and one year with the Parisian Cleaners, also of Visalia.

In January, 1922, he became associated with the Olds & Stoller Interexchange as a salesman of insurance. This company writes various kinds of insurance policies, including automobile insurance, in which Mr. Hill soon qualified as an expert. On March 1, 1922, he was made manager of the Visalia branch of the company. His promotion was an incentive to greater effort and he built up a substantial business after he assumed the management. He resigned as branch manager for Olds & Stoller on April 1, 1925, entering into business for himself as general insurance agent, using the slogan, "Let Hustling Hiram Hill Prescribe for Your Insurance Ills."

Mr. Hill is a republican in his political views and his fraternal associations are with the Eagles and the Loyal Order of Moose. In the latter organization he has been active for the past fourteeen years and he has passed through the chairs that is, he has held all the principal offices in the lodge. His recreation is in watching a good game of baseball or football. He married Miss Irene Kruse of Columbia, California. They have no children.

AUSTIN W REYNOLDS

The city of Porterville very properly boasts of having one of the youngest as well as one of the most efficient law enforcement officers in the state of California in the person of Austin W. Reynolds, city marshal and one of the best known and most popular young men of that city. Though a native of the old Sunflower state, Marshal Reynolds has been a resident of California long enough to have acquired a thorough acquaintance with local conditions and is an enthusiastic Californian. He was born in the city of Wichita, Kansas, November 12, 1894, and is a son of James Clarence and Ada (Morgan) Reynolds, who in 1919 established their home in the Porterville district in this county, where James C. Reynolds is engaged in ranching.

Reared in Wichita, Austin W. Reynolds acquired his education in the schools of that city and as a young man became employed in the service of a wholesale mercantile establishment in Wichita, where he remained for three years, and then began "railroading", a service he rendered in Kansas for three years, at the end of which time he came to California and entered the employ of the Santa Fe Railroad Company. In this service Mr. Reynolds was a member of the crew that had charge of the first Santa Fe train that passed through Porterville. After an interesting period of service with the railroad company, Mr. Reynolds quit railroading and became connected with the operations of the Associated Oil Company. After awhile he was given an appointment on the Porterville police force and made a member of the traffic squad and was thus serving when on August 15, 1924, he was appointed city marshal, he then being under thirty years of age and probably one of the youngest city marshals in the state. The effectiveness with which Marshal Reynolds has been discharging the duties of his important and responsible public office confirms the excellent judgment of the officials who secured this appointment and justifies the confidence that was thus expressed in behalf of the popular young law enforcement officer.

On October. 7, 1916, in Wichita, Austin W. Reynolds was united in marriage to Miss Jetta Rockey, who also was born in Kansas, daughter of A. E. Rockey. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds have two children, sons both: Edgar and Winton. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds are republicans and take a proper interest in the general civic affairs of the community. Mr. Reynolds is a member of the local lodge of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

T WAYNE SWITZER

Back in the early days, when Tulare county, California, was only sparsely settled, U. D. Switzer, then in his youth, located near Visalia. He grew to manhood in the county, was married to Miss Elizabeth Frans, and T. Wayne Switzer is one of their children. Both parents are still living.

T. Wayne Switzer was born near Visalia, September 25, 1893. He was educated in the public schools of Visalia and after completing the high school course he entered the Polytechnic College of Oakland, California, as a student. In 1914 he was graduated as a civil and structural engineer. For the first year after leaving college he was employed in architectural work in San Francisco. He was then associated with H. H. Holly in irrigation research until September, 1917, when he enlisted in the Three Hundred and Sixteenth United States Engineers. His regiment was ordered to France, where it took part in the engagements in Flanders, the Argonne and at St. Mihiel. After twenty-one months of active service he was discharged in the spring of 1919, being mustered out of military service in San Francisco.

Upon being discharged from the army he was employed by the Los Angeles Gas & Electric Company for about six months. He then returned to Visalia, and in September, 1919, he was appointed assistant county surveyor of Tulare county, which position he still holds a position for which he is well qualified both by training and experience.

Mr. Switzer was happily married to Miss Winifred Heath of Pennsylvania, and they make their home in Visalia. Mr. Switzer is a republican. Mr. Switzer is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the American Association of Engineers, the Forty and Eight, and the American Legion. He takes an active interest in Boy Scout work and is Scout commissioner for Tulare county.

MISS KATHARINE STACY

During the nearly twenty years of her residence in Tulare, Miss Katharine Stacy, proprietor of the Tulare Hospital, has rendered a most beneficent service in behalf of the large community her institutional activities thus have served. A trained nurse, with some years of practical experience in old, established hospitals of the east, Miss Stacy came to California on a visit in 1908 and while in Tulare was attracted to the possibilities inherent in the hospital that had been established by Miss Truitt in that city the year before. Returning east, she closed out her interests there, made arrangements for permanent residence in California and then returned here and on December 1st of that year (1908) purchased Miss Truitt's hospital plant and has since been successfully engaged in operating it.

Since taking over this hospital Miss Stacy has made many improvements along the lines of modern equipment, has greatly extended the facilities of the institution and has long been recognized as a leader in her line in this section of the state. The Tulare Hospital is pleasantly and advantageously located at No. 134 North G street and is thoroughly up to date in its equipment, particularly with respect to the facilities offered in the modern surgery which Miss Stacy erected some time after she had come into possession of the hospital, and which, in common with the other facilities of the hospital, is open to all reputable physicians practicing in this section of the state, the demand thus made upon the facilities of this admirable institution being convincing evidence of the real need it has filled in the community since its present proprietor took hold of it and got it started in the right direction. Miss Stacy employs none but trained nurses in her hospital and the service is all that can be desired, as is amply attested by the constant call made upon this service.

Miss Katharine Stacy is a native of Kansas, born in Iola, that state, but was reared in Illinois, her parents, John L. and Emily R. (Young) Stacy, having moved to Iola, in the latter state, during the days of her girlhood, and she thus had her schooling in Illinois. As a girl she was impressed with the opportunities for humane service open in the profession of nursing and after a period of intensive practical training in this exacting and difficult field in hospitals in Chicago, she became an accredited trained nurse and had for some time been engaged in the practice of that noble profession when in 1908 she made her visit into California, as above narrated, and was so much taken with the opportunity for service in this delightful valley that she decided to devote the remainder of her life to such a beneficent service here. With that end in view she bought the Tulare Hospital and entered upon her noble labors here. Miss Stacy is a republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to civic affairs and to the general good works of the community, though her chief interest, very properly, centers in her hospital work, and in that connection she is recognized as a personal factor of large importance in the community.

ARTHUR DELERAY

Arthur Deleray, a mining engineer of wide experience and the manager of the plant and operations of the Sierra Magnesite Company of Chicago in Porterville, is a native son of California and has been connected with mining operations since the days of his boyhood, these operations having been carried on not only extensively in this state, but in Alaska and Nevada. An expert in magnesite production, he has been connected with operations along that line in the Porterville section for years and is widely known in mining circles. He was born in Lassen county, this state, July 20, 1881, and is a son of Bert and Lucy (Poe) Deleray, the latter of whom was born in the state of Wisconsin and both of whom are still living, now residing in Santa Cruz. Bert Deleray also is a native son of California, born in Calaveras county, and is a son of Louis Deleray, who was one of the pioneers in the mining activities in that county. The Delerays are of French stock.

By reason of several changes of residence made by his father during the days of his youth Arthur Deleray's early education was acquired in schools in various towns and cities of California and he grew up familiar with mining operations. When nineteen years of age (in 1900) he made his first trip into the mining country in Alaska and his summers thereafter until 1911 were spent in that country, his winters being spent in the mines in California. Meanwhile, he was carrying on his studies in the lines of technical training, with particular reference to mining engineering, and in 1907 received from the A. Vandernillen School of Mines of Oakland his degree as a Graduate Engineer. In 1911 Mr. Deleray was given engineering charge of a gold mining proposition in Nevada and was thus engaged until 1914, when he returned to California to take the oversight of a mine at Bodie, in Mono county. In the next year (1915) he became connected with the operations of the Lindsay Mining Company in the magnesite mines in the Porterville district, being thus employed until that company sold out in 1917. He associated himself with R. D. Adams, working out of San Francisco and at the same time managing the White Rock mining property, until 1920, when the Sierra Magnesite Company of Chicago was organized and in October of that year took over the magnesite properties in Porterville, and he was made manager of the plant and operations of the company at that place, where he ever since has been located. This company mines the magnesite (native magnesium carbonate) in the mountains adjacent to Porterville and has its reduction plant in the city, its products being shipped from there to all parts of the country, and it thus is one of the important industries of this section of the state.

On October 23, 1905, in San Jose, Mr. Deleray was united in marriage to Miss Merry Early, who was born in Calaveras county, this state, December 25, 1887, daughter of John Early. Mr. and Mrs. Deleray have, three children, all sons: Dudley, Wilfred and Kenneth Deleray. Mr. and Mrs. Deleray are republicans and take a proper interest in the general civic affairs of the community as well as in its social and cultural activities. Mr. Deleray is an active member of the locally influential Porterville Rotary Club and is also affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

EDWARD L BRANDON

Among those who have been especially active in the development of the public utilities of Tulare county in recent years is Edward L. Brandon, general superintendent of the Central Counties Gas Company, with headquarters in Visalia. He was born June 2, 1873, on a farm in Mercer county, Ohio, a son of Lewis and Mary E. (Downing) Brandon. The father was a farmer, and also worked at times at the trade of mason. Both parents are deceased.

Edward L. Brandon attended the district schools until he was seventeen years of age, when he was forced by circumstances to become the architect of his own fortune and found employment in running a steam engine. Since then he has learned many lessons in the school of experience, while by reading and observation he has acquired a practical knowledge of men and affairs. He continued to follow the occupation of stationary engineer until he came to California in 1908. His first employment in this state was as a well driller in Porterville. He was then with the Porterville Gas Company for about six months, when he resumed well drilling in the oil fields for the Standard Oil Company. Six months later he returned to the gas company in Porterville and was employed there until the company passed into the hands of a receiver. For the next three years he followed trucking with fair success.

The Central Counties Gas Company was formed in 1918 and soon afterwards Francis H. Hunter, vice president and general manager of the new corporation, induced Mr. Brandon to accept the position of superintendent of the plant at Visalia. Mr. Hunter afterward became president of the company, and Mr. Brandon, since May, 1922, has occupied the position of general superintendent The company supplies six towns, and the entire outfit, including buildings, transmission lines, etc., is under Mr. Brandon's immediate supervision. The company owes much of its success to his tireless energy and knowledge of gas works.

Before leaving Ohio Mr. Brandon was married to Miss Etta G. Harshbarger, and they have three children: Edgar Leroy, Nellie Marie and Ralph Loree. While Mr. Brandon takes a commendable interest in all questions affecting the public good, he is not a politician. In local matters especially he places the man of good character and reputation above party considerations. His fraternal relations are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

ARTHUR H KELLY

Arthur H. Kelly is a native of Visalia, California, born February 15, 1877, and his entire life has been passed in that city, where he has been actively identified with its business interests. His parents, Greenbury and Mary Jane Kelly, crossed the plains in 1857 and were among the early settlers in the immediate vicinity of Visalia, then only a small straggling village. For some time the father was engaged in freighting between Visalia and Stockton. He then purchased a large farm adjoining Visalia and there passed the remainder of his life. He died in 1885 and his widow passed away in 1914. Of their twelve children five sons and seven daughters all are living except one son who died in infancy.

Arthur H. Kelly attended the common schools (there were no separate high schools in those days) until he was sixteen years of age. He then left school and took charge of his mother's ranch, where he remained until he was twenty-two years old. He then entered the employ of the Spalding Lumber Company of Visalia, but left that concern five months later to become manager for the old Visalia Lumber Company. The plant of this company was later sold to the Pierson & Anderson Lumber Company, and still later the name was changed to the Tulare County Lumber Company. Mr. Kelly remained with it through all these changes as manager until July, 1922, when he embarked in his present business as a dealer in building materials at No. 702 South Bridge street. For some twenty years he was manager of the Visalia and Lindsay yards of the Tulare County Lumber Company. This enabled him to form acquaintances among the contractors, many of whom have become his customers in his new undertaking. Mr. Kelly's son, Everett O., is associated with his father in business. 

Mr. Kelly is a democrat in his political affiliations, but has never been especially active in political work. He is the secretary of the Visalia Kiwanis Club, and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Woodmen of the World, and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In his younger days he was one of the best amateur baseball players in Visalia, and is still fond of the game.

FRANK P CUNNINGHAM

Frank P. Cunningham, supervisor of the operations in connection with the government national forest in the Porterville district and one of the veterans in the forest service, for more than twenty years thus connected, is a native son of California and has lived in this state all his life, a resident of this section for the past ten years and more. He was born on a pioneer farm in Shasta county, March 30, 1879, and is a son of James M. and Phoebe (Lowder) Cunningham, the latter a native of the state of Iowa and the former a native of Missouri, and both are still living in Shasta county, where they have resided for nearly a half century. James M. Cunningham came to California as a young man in 1876 and found things here so much to his liking that he made arrangements for establishing himself here and then returned east and was married, returning to California with his bride in 1878 and establishing his home in Shasta county, where he developed a good piece of property and where he was long engaged in farming and stock raising. He also carried on sawmilling operations and took a good citizen's part in local civic affairs, for twelve years serving as justice of the peace in his community.

Reared on the home farm in Shasta county, Frank P. Cunningham received his public schooling in that neighborhood and supplemented this by a course in Atkinson's BusinessCollege in Sacramento. From the days of his boyhood he was attentive to the labors of the home farm, helpful in the development of his father's interests there, and he remained on the home place in Shasta county until he was twenty-six years of age, when, in 1907, he entered the service of the government's department of forest preserves, his initial connection with the forest service having been rendered in Trinity county. In September, 1907, he was transferred to the force of forest rangers in Siskiyou county and was sent to the service in Scott valley, whence in 1913 he was transferred to the Bakersfield station, and was there in supervisory charge of the forest service in the Hot Springs district in Tulare county and of the forest in Kern county until his transfer in 1918 to the Porterville district, and he since has been thus engaged, as supervisor, with present offices in the Home Bank building in Porterville, one of the best known men in the forest service in California.

On February 17, 1904, in Balls Ferry, California, Frank P. Cunningham was united in marriage to Miss Della Schooling, who also was born in Shasta county, daughter of Irvin S. Schooling. Mr. and Mrs. Cunningham have two children: A daughter, Lola, and a son, Fred Cunningham. Mr. Cunningham is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and is also affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America.

MISS FLORESTINE A GARCIA

Miss Florestine A. Garcia, representative in Visalia of the H. J. Caldwell interests, was born in the state of Louisiana and was reared and had her schooling in the south, but she is quite content to regard herself as a Californian, for she has found conditions here very much to her liking. She is a daughter of Benjamin and Caroline (Jehlen) Garcia, the latter of whom died when the daughter was a young girl. The late Benjamin Garcia, who was for many years a well known hotel man in Louisiana, came to California upon his retirement from active business some years ago and his last days were spent in Tulare, where he died in 1922.

Since taking up her residence in this county Miss Garcia, together with her sister, Pauline M. Barousse, has taken quite an interest in alfalfa and chicken culture and has a fine place of thirty acres in the vicinity of Visalia, twenty acres of which she has under cultivation and on which place she has had a pleasant home erected. In addition to looking after the development of this place she also is acting as secretary- manager of the H. J. Caldwell interests and has been quite successful in her operations.

KARL A MACHETANZ

Karl A. Machetanz city attorney of Exeter, California, was born in Kenton, Ohio, December 20, 1879. His parents, Fred and Minnie (Traeger) Machetanz, were descendants of Ohio pioneer families. For many years Fred Machetanz was a prominent manufacturer of leather goods in Kenton. After attending the public schools of his native town, Karl A. Machetanz entered the Ohio Wesleyan University, where he received his degree of A. B., but left that institution for the University of Minnesota, where he received his LL. B. and Master of Laws degrees, after which he was instructor of mathematics and history for one year in the Pomona high school, Pomona, California. From Pomona he went to Porterville, where he remained only a short time, when he began the practice of law in Visalia. In 1914 he located in Exeter, where he has attained a high rank as an attorney.

As a high school boy Karl A. Machetanz was an active participant in all outdoor games. Some of his classmates there have since won distinction in professional baseball. His fondness for athletic sports remained with him throughout his college career. In the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, Ohio, he was a pitcher on the baseball team, played the important position of halfback in football, and was left guard on the basketball team. At Pomona he was coach of the high school baseball team. In the university he became a member of the Phi Kappa Psi and Delta Omicrom Alpha fraternities. He is also a Scottish Rite Mason and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine in the Masonic fraternity.

On January 18, 1922, Karl A. Machetanz and Lillian L. Timmermeister of Wapakoneta, Ohio, were united in marriage. She is a member of one of Ohio's old families. Mr. Machetanz takes an active interest in civic affairs. Politically he is a democrat and has served as a member of the county central committee. In addition to his law practice he is interested in grape culture. Associated with him in practice is his younger brother, W. G. Machetanz, a graduate of the law department of Yale University, who came to Exeter immediately upon receiving his degree. He is now a deputy in the district attorney's office in Visalia.

PETER BARBIS

Peter Barbis, one of the owners of the Visalia Cafe, was born August 15, 1895, in Greece, where his parents still reside. He received a practical education in the schools of his native land and at the age of seventeen years he decided to seek his fortune in the United States. Having relatives in Visalia, California, he came directly to that city, where he found employment in a restaurant. For several years he worked at this occupation, saving his earnings with a view to going into business for himself. In 1920 he and a cousin opened the Visalia Cafe, now one of the popular eating houses of the city.

In 1918 Mr. Barbis made application for citizenship and in 1925 received his papers, in which he takes a commendable pride. He takes a worthy interest in public affairs, especially those of a local nature. He belongs to the Fraternal Order of Eagles, which is the only organization of that character to claim his membership. He is unmarried.

ORLANDO HENRY HUBER

Orlando Henry Huber, head of the Mission Building Company of Porterville, former member of the city council, a former member of the California state legislature and for years recognized as a leader in the building trades hereabout, architect and builder of some of the most notable buildings erected in and about Porterville during the period of that city's "modern" development, is a native of the state of Illinois, but has been a resident of California since the days of his boyhood. He was born on a farm in the immediate vicinity of the old Mormon town of Nauvoo, on the Mississippi river, in Hancock county, Illinois, August 9, 1857, and is a son of Martin and Philippina (Ritter) Huber, members of pioneer families in that section of Illinois. Martin Huber died in 1868 and his widow survived him for many years, her last days being spent in California, where she died in 1899.

Reared on the home farm in the neighborhood of Nauvoo, Orlando Henry Huber acquired his education in the schools of that town and on account of being bereft of his father when but eleven years of age early began to assume mature responsibilities. He was attracted to the carpenter trade and as a boy became pretty well skilled along that line. When he was sixteen years of age, in 1873, he came to California and in San Francisco found plenty of work at his trade, for the demand for carpenters and builders in the city about that time exceeded the visible supply for skilled workmen. Finding conditions here to his liking, Mr. Huber determined to make California his home. His mother was agreeable to this plan and a few months later joined him here and in this state spent the remainder of her life.

For more than ten years Mr. Huber continued working as a carpenter in San Francisco and in the neighboring cities, and then, in 1887, established himself in business as a building contractor in Azusa, Los Angeles county, where he took part in the extensive building operations then being carried on at that place. Mr. Huber made his home in Azusa for more than fifteen years, or until 1904, when he moved to Huntington Beach, in Orange county, and was there engaged in building operations, contractor of much of the notable work in the building line being done there during that period, until in 1907, when he established his home in Porterville, where he since has resided and where he is very pleasantly and very comfortably situated. For four years after his arrival in Porterville, Mr. Huber carried on his contracting business independently, and then, in 1911, organized the business as the Mission Building Company, of which he is the head, and has since been carrying on his operations under that firm style. It is perhaps not too much to say that Mr. Huber is recognized as the leading building contractor in and about Porterville. Among the numerous notable contracts he has carried out of recent years is that involved in the erection of the city library building; Loyd's funeral parlors, which are said to be the best designed of any similar establishment in California, and which have been copied by discriminating morticians in other cities of the state; quite a number of the better class of the business buildings erected in recent years; and no end of the better residences which have gone up in and about Porterville during the period of his residence here.

In July, 1885, Mr. Huber was married to May Griffith of Gold Hill, Oregon, who was one of the leading educators of the state, holding a life diploma. She passed away on April 1, 1910. In November, 1912, in Fresno, Mr. Huber was united in marriage to Miss Grace Zehrbaugh, who was born in Muncie, Indiana, and who has been a resident of California since 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Huber are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and are republicans, the former for years having been regarded as one of the leaders of that party in this section. He was a member of the common council of the city of Porterville during the period of this country's participation in the World war and in other ways has taken part in local civic activities. During the time of his residence in Azusa he took an active part in local politics and was elected to represent that district in the state legislature, in which body he served during two regular sessions and one extra session. Mr. Huber is a Knight Templar (York Rite) Mason and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, and is also affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World.

JOHN J JANELLI

One of the business concerns of Visalia, California, that has made distinctive progress in recent years is the Rex Bottling Works, operated by John J. Janelli and Vincent Di Muccio. John J. Janelli was born in the city of New York, October 8, 1898, a son of Joseph and Marie Janelli. His mother died while he was still in his infancy. In his, early boyhood he attended the public schools in his native city, but circumstances compelled him to become a bread-winner at a comparatively early age. He was engaged in various occupations, including newspaper work, in New York city until 1920, when he decided to come to California.

His first residence in the state was in Fresno, where he was engaged in the butcher business for a year. He then formed the partnership with Mr. Di Muccio and bought the Rex Bottling Works of Visalia. At that time the plant was doing but a small business and the new proprietors faced the problem of increasing the sale of products. By systematic effort and a close attention to the details of management they succeeded beyond their expectations. They manufacture the Rex brand of grape juice, charge tanks for soda fountains, and turn out practically all kinds of soft drinks. In building up this business they have added to their equipment until the old building does not afford sufficient room. Consequently they erected a larger structure, which is fitted out with the most approved machinery used in the bottling business. Their trade now extends to all the principal towns of Kings and Tulare counties, and they expect to corer a still wider territory. They have increased the floor space three times in the new plant. They have increased their motor equipment from one small truck to six machines. They are a progressive company and have made many friends since coming here. Mr. Janelli has built his home adjoining the plant. Mr. Janelli was married to Miss Rose Janelli, and they have one daughter, named Marie. Mr. Janelli is a democrat and his fraternal relations are with the Order of Eagles, in which he is a member in good standing.

REV PATRICK F McLAUGHLIN

Since 1918 Rev. Patrick F. McLaughlin has been the priest in charge of St. Mary's church in Visalia, the mother parish of all the Catholic churches in the San Joaquin valley. In that time he has erected the convent and school, the buildings of which were completed and the institution opened in 1923.

Patrick F. McLaughlin was born in the city of Boston, Massachusetts, April 4, 1864. His elementary education was acquired in the St. Mary's Parochial school of his native city, after which he attended the Boston College. In 1895 he was graduated from Fordham College,New York city, and later received a degree from the Seminary of St. Sulpice, in France. Returning to the United States, he continued his studies in the University of Niagara at Niagara Falls, New York, and on June 4, 1898, he was ordained to the priesthood.

His first assignment was as assistant priest in the parish of St. Vincent de Paul, the church of which is located on Twenty-third street, New York city. In 1906 he came to California and was for a time associated with the Indian school at Banning. His first pastorate in California was with St. Bridget's church in Hanford. In 1911 he was transferred to East San Diego, where he organized the parish of Our Lady of the Sacred Heart. During the seven years he was in charge of this parish he built a new church edifice and a priest's residence. In 1918 he came to Visalia, where his work has already been described.

Before entering the priesthood Father McLaughlin thoroughly prepared himself for each and all of his various duties. By his personality and public spirit he has made many friends, not only among Catholics, but also among non-Catholics, who respect him for his sterling character and earnestness in his work.

JUDGE E C ARCHER

The biography of a man is of importance and interest to other men just to the degree that his life and work touches and influences the lives of his fellow individuals. The story is best told as it is written on the hearts of men and women, and the man himself does the writing. Judge E. C. Archer has so lived among his fellowmen that to an unusual degree he commands the confidence and esteem of the entire community, and has for eleven years served ably and impartially as justice of the peace in Cutler. He was born on his father's ranch near Visalia, on the 16th day of July, 1877. His parents were Andrew J. and Martha E. (Van Tassell) Archer, the former of whom is deceased, while his widow still resides in Dinuba. Andrew J. Archer, who was a native of Missouri, crossed the plains by ox teams at the age of six years. The family first located in Sonoma county, where they remained until 1870, when they came to Tulare county, locating near Visalia, where Andrew J. Archer engaged in farming and stock raising. Later he also homesteaded near Dinuba, but before that town was founded. Grandfather Van Tassell was a native of New York state, later lived for a time in Indiana, and in 1849 joined the host which crossed the great western plains to California. In this state his daughter, Martha E. Van Tassell, was born.

E. C. Archer acquired a good practical education, graduating from high school, and remained on his father's farm until he had attained his majority. He then engaged in ranching near Orosi, also followed dairy farming, and is now in partnership with his brother, R. C. Archer, in the mercantile business in Cutler. He is progressive and enterprising in his business methods, which are in accordance with the highest principles of business honor, and the business has been successful to a very gratifying degree. Mr. Archer still owns a splendid vineyard of twenty-five acres.

Judge Archer has been a lifelong supporter of the democratic party and has given loyal service as a member of the county central committee. He has been three times elected justice of the peace and his record during the eleven years of his incumbency of that position has been such as to reflect in the highest possible degree his fidelity, ability and fairness as a judicial officer. His qualifications for the office of judge are unquestionable, for he possesses to a marked degree the acumen of the judicial temperament.

Judge Archer was married to Miss S. Elizabeth Minter, a native of Missouri, who came to California in 1911. They are the parents of a son: Ralph Minter. Judge Archer is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Fraternal Brotherhood, and he is a past president of the Cutler Chamber of Commerce.

VINCENT DI MUCCIO

Vincent Di Muccio, junior member of the firm of Janelli & Muccio, proprietors of the Rex Bottling Works of Visalia, was born in sunny Italy, April 4, 1902. His parents, Nicholas and Josephine Di Muccio, still live in that country.

Vincent Di Muccio was educated in the schools of his native land and in 1920 came to California. The same year he formed the partnership with Mr. Janelli and purchased the Rex Bottling Works, then in a rather run-down condition, but they have since placed it upon a paying basis. (See sketch of Mr. Janelli on another page of this volume.)

Since coming to the United States Mr. Di Muccio has attended night school and has in other ways shown an ambition to improve his education. He has applied for his citizenship papers and is desirous of possessing the essential qualifications of a real American, hence his attendance upon night school. Still a young man, unmarried, he is fond of outdoor sports, particularly baseball and horseshoe pitching. In the latter he is considered one of the best inVisalia.

REV JOSEPH B HOWARD

Though a comparative newcomer in Tulare county, the Rev. Joseph B. Howard, pastor of St. Aloysius's Roman Catholic church in Tulare, has created a distinct impression by the enthusiastic character of his labors in that field and has been gladly welcomed to citizenship in this community. Not long after his arrival in Tulare, Father Howard came to be recognized as a young clergyman of brilliant powers and of high promise and he has had the enthusiastic support not only of the members of his own parish but of many thoughtful citizens representative of other communions. Upon his installation as pastor of the parish of St. Aloysius, Father Howard found there much ground for improvement, a fertile field, indeed, and one susceptible of promising tillage. By creating new enthusiasms for the work of the church among his parishioners and by his earnest manner of winning the confidence of the whole community, he presently found that an entirely new spirit was being created in the parish, together with a sincere desire to push forward. This spirit has been cultivated under the earnest ministration of the young clergyman, and even now the erection of a new church edifice is in building, the plans contemplating an expenditure of around thirty thousand dollars, with a view to giving the parish of St. Aloysius an establishment in keeping with the fervor and the enterprise of its members and their energetic spiritual leader. Though an Englishman by birth, the Rev. Joseph B. Howard is enthusiastically American in his impulses and ambitions, and by willing adoption a devoted Californian, continually delighted with the selective chance which brought him to this favored region. He was born in Liverpool, England, son of Joseph B. and Ann (Worsley) Howard, both also natives of England, the former of whom was a substantial building contractor. Both are deceased, all their lives having been spent in their native land.

Reared in his home place, Joseph B. Howard was given the advantage of excellent schooling in his boyhood and his thoughts early turned to the service of the church. Under proper preceptorship his studies were directed in this channel and he presently entered upon his classical studies in the University of London, from which venerable institution he received his Bachelor of Arts degree. For theology and the humanities he then went to Rome and in the great Gregorian University in that city completed his theological studies and was prepared for holy orders. He then came to the United States, under direction of the church, and in 1920, in San Francisco, was ordained to the priesthood and assigned to duty as assistant to the pastor of Basil parish, in Los Angeles. From that station he presently was transferred to Cathedral parish in Fresno, and in this latter place rendered service as assistant to the pastor until September, 1924, when he was made pastor of the parish of St. Aloysius in Tulare and has since been rendering acceptable and efficient service to the church in that promising and expanding field. Father Howard is the spiritual director of the local council of the Knights of Columbus in Tulare and is an enthusiastic and helpful member of the local Rotary Club, his classification in Rotary having been warmly welcomed by the enterprising members of that locally influential and progressive organization.

CLEMENT T BUCKMAN

One of the leading insurance houses of Visalia, California, is the firm of Buckman, Mitchell & McGinty, Incorporated. The senior member of this firm was born in Visalia, May 23, 1889, and is a son of Clement T. and Irene C. (Combs) Buckman. The father crossed the plains with his parents some time in the '50s and located first in Arizona. Some ten years later they came to California and located in Tulare county. There Clement T. Buckman, Sr., passed the remainder of his life and was actively identified with public affairs. He held the office of county auditor and served several years as justice of the peace. The latter years, of his life were spent as a contractor and road builder. His death occurred in 1916. His widow is still living.

Clement T. Buckman was educated in the public schools of Exeter and the Visalia high school, being a member of the graduating class in the latter institution in 1909. He then was employed in the engineering department of the Southern Pacific Railroad until 1916, when he embarked in the insurance business for himself. His success is evidenced by the fact that in February, 1924, the business of Buckman, Mitchell & McGinty was incorporated, with offices in Visalia and Fresno. All three members of the firm are wide-awake insurance men and the company carries a large part of the insurance of Tulare and Fresno counties, with a constantly growing patronage.

On February 27, 1912, Mr. Buckman was married to Miss Edna R. Tschumy, a native of Visalia, and they have one daughter, Marjory Lois. Mr. Buckman is a prominent Mason, being a Knights Templar, a thirty- second degree member of the Scottish Rite, and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the Order of Sciots, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and the Rotary Club of Visalia. Politically he is a republican and he takes a commendable interest in public affairs, though he is not an office-seeker. He is fond of outdoor sports, such as hunting and fishing, and is a great lover of good bird dogs.

GUY WEBB

Guy Webb, a prominent undertaker of Lindsay, California, was born near Glasgow, Kentucky, September 10, 1885. His parents, Walter H. and Agnes (Holsclaw) Webb, were members of old southern families. They were the parents of eight children, viz.: Andrew, Loma, Oscar, Guy, Fred, Broda, Fannie and Roy. Andrew and Fannie still live in Kentucky; Loma is Mrs. W. A. Ebert of Miami, Florida; Oscar, Fred and Roy live in Los Angeles; and Broda lives in Montgomery, Alabama.

Guy Webb lived on his father's farm until he was about nineteen years of age and by attending the public schools during the fall and winter months he acquired a good practical education. In 1904 he came to California, located in Lindsay and engaged in the livery business. Among the vehicles he possessed was a hearse which was used by J. M. Hadley, undertaker, and in this way he became connected with the business. In 1915 he entered the employ of Mr. Hadley and four years later bought out his employer, who then went to Visalia. Mr. Webb conducts the business at his residence on Mirage avenue, in the large home erected by Mr. Hadley, with rooms for undertaking purposes.

In 1909 Mr. Webb was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Keeley, a descendant of one of Lindsay's pioneer families. Her father was a prominent citizen in his day. Mr. and Mrs. Webb have five children: Agnes, John, Jay, Gyneth and Winifred. Fraternally Mr. Webb is a member of the Masonic and Elks lodges of Lindsay. He takes an interest in all projects for the improvement of local conditions, is a director of the Lindsay Chamber of Commerce, and is now serving his first term as one of the city trustees. He owns residence property in Lindsay.

FRANCIS K RITCHIE

Francis K. Ritchie, manager of the plant of the Sunflower Packing Company of Porterville and one of the most energetic, enthusiastic and enterprising young fruit men in this section of California, has been a resident of this state since 1912 and here literally "grew up" to the fruit business, obtaining a first hand knowledge of orchard development and of the fruit-packing industry in Orange county, and since he engaged in practical operations along these lines in Porterville he has become recognized as one of the leaders in that line hereabout. He was born in the village of Beaver Crossing, Seward county, in southeastern Nebraska, November 11, 1894, and is a son of J. H. and Myrtle M. (King) Ritchie, who in 1912 came to California and established their home at Anaheim, in Orange county, where they are now living, J. H. Ritchie being a well known orchardist and packing-house manager there.

By a comparison of above dates it will be observed that Francis K. Ritchie was but eighteen years of age when he came to California with his parents in 1912. He at once became enthusiastically interested in orange culture and in association with his father's enterprises soon became thoroughly familiar with the details not only of growing but of packing and marketing, a business to which he readily adapted himself and willingly adopted as a vocation. Along this line he became acquainted with conditions in Tulare county, and particularly in the Porterville district, and in 1922 located in Porterville as the manager of the plant and affairs of the Sunflower Packing Company. He has since been thus engaged, a practical, experienced and successful young fruit man who is devoting the best of his energies to the development of this great industry in this section.

On December 27, 1915, in Anaheim, Mr. Ritchie was united in marriage to Miss Lila R. Abbott, who was born in Minnesota, daughter of J. L. Abbott, but who was reared in California. Mr. and Mrs. Ritchie have a pleasant home in Porterville. They are republicans and take a proper interest in general community affairs. Mr. Ritchie is the president (1925) of the popular and locally influential Lions Club, is a Royal Arch Mason and is also a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

RANKIN R SPARKS

Rankin R. Sparks, superintendent of the city cemetery in Visalia, California, was born on a farm near Springfield, Missouri, on March 31st of the year 1867. He was educated in the rural schools of Missouri and assisted his father with the farm work until 1886. In that year he came with his parents, William H. and Elmira (Goins) Sparks, to California. The family arrived in Visalia in September and the father engaged in farming and poultry raising. He died in 1889 and his widow survived until June, 1914, when she, too, passed away.

Rankin R. Sparks was made superintendent of the City cemetery soon after his arrival in Visalia and held that position for about a year. He was then employed in mechanical work for twelve years, when he again took charge of the cemetery. Since that time he has greatly improved the grounds until he has one of the most beautiful burial places in the San Joaquin valley. That his labor in this respect has been appreciated is seen in the fact that he has been continued in his position year after year.

Mr. Sparks was married to Miss Mary Isabelle Kelly of Three Rivers, Tulare county. This union has been blessed with two sons and a daughter : Ernest 0., Roscoe R. and Naomi Ruth. The two sons were in the army and saw service in France during the late World War. Both were honorably discharged and returned home to engage in civilian pursuits. Mr. Sparks is a member of the Visalia Chamber of Commerce, the Woodmen of the World and the American Association of Cemetery Superintendents.

FRANK E CORWIN, M D

Some one has aptly said: "He serves the Master best who serves humanity most." There is no class to whom greater gratitude is due than to the noble-minded men whose lifework is the alleviation of suffering and the lengthening of human life. Among the physicians of Tulare county who have risen to eminence in their chosen calling, specific mention should be made of Dr. Frank E. Corwin, the efficient resident doctor at the California Hot Springs. He is a native of the state of Iowa, born on the 11th day of April, 1873. His parents, W. B. and Mary (Tuft) Corwin, were both natives of Ohio, the father having been a nephew of Governor Tom Corwin of that state. W. B. Corwin was a veteran of the Civil War and during his period of service had charge of the maintenance of the highway between Louisville and Nashville,Kentucky, being stationed at Bowling Green. After the war he went to Iowa, where he engaged in farming and stock dealing for a few years, but died at the comparatively early age of thirty-six years.

Frank E. Corwin received his elemental education in the public schools and after graduating from high school, he entered the Northern Illinois Normal School, at Dixon, Illinois. Later, having decided to devote his life to the healing profession, he matriculated in the Keokuk Medical College, from which he was graduated in 1897. Later he attended and graduated from the Southern School of Osteopathy, at Franklin, Kentucky. For a few years after completing his professional studies, Dr. Corwin engaged in running a drug and grocery store in Park City, Montana, but in 1903 he opened a health resort known as Corwin's Hot Springs, in Montana, near Yellowstone Park. He met with fair success, but was unfortunate in having his buildings destroyed by fire three years later. He then became resident physician at Hunter Hot Springs, remaining there two years, and then engaged in the general practice in Anaheim, California. In 1915 he was induced to come to California Hot Springs as resident physician and has here remained. Careful professional training, supplemented by close study, has made him unusually well qualified as a diagnostician and he has been an important factor in the successful handling of many difficult cases at the Springs. Genial and unassuming, he has made many warm and loyal friends since coming here and is deservedly popular. Mrs. Corwin is the Doctor's assistant.

Dr. Corwin is a member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, and is also a Noble of Algeria Temple of the Mystic Shrine and belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Mrs. Corwin is a member of the P. E. O. Sisterhood and the Order of the Eastern Star.

At Cantril, Iowa, August 28, 1895, Dr. Corwin was married to Miss Ada Belle Tharp of Mount Sterling, Iowa, and they have a daughter, Harriette, who is the wife of Virgil Cook of  San Jose, California. The Doctor has a ten-acre orange grove at Strathmore, a vineyard of twenty acres at Delano, and a mountain home ranch of eighty acres. He is a republican and Mrs. Corwin is a democrat.

WILLIAM SHERMAN CASE

William Sherman Case, proprietor of the popular Troy Steam Laundry in Porterville, a member of the common council of that city and one of the energetic and enterprising factors in the general civic and commercial life of the city and of the community at large, has been a resident of California for the past fifteen years and more and is thus thoroughly conversant with conditions here. Mr. Case is a Hoosier by birth, a fact of which he never has ceased to be proud, for the name Hoosier has come to take on a different meaning than it had in the days when it was regarded as a term of ignominy and reproach, a synonym for backwoods ignorance and sloth. Prior to his coming to California, Mr. Case had traveled widely and was familiar with the capitals of Europe and the best cities of America, but he has found conditions in California so much to his liking that he was quite content to cast in his lot with that of the people of this state when he arrived here and found so truly a goodly land and one fair to look upon. He was born on a farm in Pike county, in the southwestern portion of Indiana, December 1, 1879, and is a son of Thomas and Margaret (Dawson) Case, both members of old American families and both of whom died before he was six years of age.

Having been thus bereft of his parents while but a child, William Sherman Case was reared by kinsfolk in the historic old city of Vincennes, Indiana, and in the public schools of that city acquired his early education. Becoming attracted to the study of dentistry after he left the high-school, he entered the dental department of the University of Michigan, starting in to work his way through college by selling maps for the Scarborough map publishing concern, which in those days was not only doing a fine business in this country but had extended its operations to cover Europe. Mr. Case displayed such an unusual aptitude as a salesman along this line that his company induced him to give up his idea of becoming a dentist and take a permanent connection with its sales and distribution department. He accepted this proposition and was sent to England as salesman and later became the manager of the London offices of the company, a position he occupied for five or six years, during four years of which time he also was the assistant manager of the company's Paris office.

Upon his return to the United States following this European experience in international salesmanship, Mr. Case was for several years engaged as a traveling salesman, representing various companies, and then for a year was in charge of the selling operations of the Southern Seating & Cabinet Company, with headquarters in Jackson, Tennessee. In January, 1910, he came to California to spend the remainder of the winter in Los Angeles and while there became so deeply impressed by the possibilities of the situation in this state that he decided to become a permanent resident. Closing out his eastern connections, Mr. Case formed a partnership with an experienced laundryman and in August of that year (1910) established the Troy Steam Laundry in Porterville, which city ever since has been his home and where he now is very comfortably and very pleasantly situated. In 1911 he bought his partner's interest in this laundry plant and carried on the business until July, 1920, when he sold out; but two years later he again took charge of the establishment and has since been operating it, proprietor of a well established and well equipped modern laundry plant and one of the best known men in his line in this section of the state. Mr. Case is a republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs, at present (1925) serving as the representative of his ward in the city common council.

In 1907, in Jackson, Tennessee, Mr. Case was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Ingersoll, who was born and reared in Tennessee, a member of one of the old families of that state, and they have one child, a daughter, Mary Lillian Case. Mr. Case is a member of the Masonic order and he and Mrs. Case are members of the local chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star. In addition to his laundry interest Mr. Case owns a profitable orange orchard and finds much of interest in its cultivation.

JOSEPH R BARBONI

Joseph R. Barboni was born in San Jose, California ,September 6, 1894, a son of Joseph C. and Josephine C. (Yocco) Barboni. The father came to California in 1879 and was for years the chef at the old Hotel Vendome in San Jose. He has passed away. The mother is a native of California and is now a resident of Visalia.

Joseph Barboni was educated in the public schools, graduating from the San Jose high school as a member of the class of 1911. His first position in Visalia was with H. H. Holley in the insurance business, as stenographer and bookkeeper. After a year with Mr. Holley, he accepted a position with the First National Bank of Fresno, where he remained for about a year. He then came to Visalia as bookkeeper for the bank with which he is still connected, and in 1920 was elected to the position of cashier.

On February 12, 1916, Mr. Barboni was married to Miss Ora Barr of Visalia, and they have one daughter: Betty Jane. They are members of the Episcopal church. Mr. Barboni takes a commendable interest in the welfare of Visalia and Tulare county and is president of the Rotary Club. He is a Royal Arch Mason, a past exalted ruler of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and belongs to the Order of Sciots. Politically he is a republican and is now (1925) serving his first term as mayor of Visalia. He is a great lover of baseball and rarely misses an opportunity to attend a game.

FRANK CARSON

When the Visalia Land & Investment Company was formed in 1911, Frank Carson became identified with it and is now the company's general manager. He was born in the Dominion of Canada, April 23, 1872. While he was still in his early childhood his parents, James and Annie Carson, removed to the state of Maine. There he was educated in the public schools and upon arriving at manhood's estate started out to seek his fortune. For several years he followed the occupation of miner in different parts of the country and came to California about the beginning of the present century. In 1909 he located in Visalia and two years later took a position with his present company, in which he has demonstrated his executive ability.

Although born a British subject, Mr. Carson is now a citizen of the United States. As an adherent to democratic principles he takes an interest in all subjects of a public nature, though he has never been an active politician. He is a member of the Visalia Kiwanis Club and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, in both of which he is deservedly popular because of his manly conduct and genial good fellowship. He is unmarried and finds his recreation in hunting and fishing, pastimes of which he is especially fond.

LEWIS BRUCE, D O

In the treatment of the ills to which human flesh is heir, various schools of medicine, or the healing art, have come into existence. Prominent among these systems of treatment is osteopathy, of which Dr. Lewis Bruce is a well qualified representative. He was born and reared on a farm near Cumberland, Iowa, and is a son of H. S. and Irene (Burch) Bruce. The father was born in Ohio, though his parents came to that state from Virginia and were of Scotch descent.

Lewis Bruce received a high school education, after which he enrolled as a student in Dr. S. S. Still's School of Osteopathy at Des Moines, Iowa, from which he was graduated in January, 1902. In 1903 he came to California and began practice in Hanford. He remained in Hanford until 1914, when he came to Lindsay, where he has built up a lucrative practice. He was the first osteopath to locate in Lindsay and is one of the pioneer osteopathic physicians of the San Joaquin valley.

Just before coming to California Dr. Bruce was married to Miss Leone Peterson and they have two daughters Gloria and Wilda May. Since locating in Lindsay Dr. Bruce has become connected with one of the city's substantial financial institutions. He was one of the organizers of the Lindsay National Bank, in which he was a stockholder and director. Later a branch of the Pacific Southwest Trust & Savings Bank was established in Lindsay and in 1924 it took over the business and good will of the Lindsay National. Dr. Bruce is now a member of the advisory committee of the bank. He owns a grove of forty acres of oranges, lemons and grapefruit.

JOHN F MICHELS

In 1905 John R. Michels came to Tulare county from Dodge county, Nebraska, and engaged in fruit culture. At that time his son, the subject of this sketch, was about twelve years of age, for he was born in Hooper, Dodge county, March 10, 1893. His mother's maiden name was Hermine Schaber. Both parents are living.

John F. Michels acquired his education in the public schools. After graduating from the high school he was employed for four years as a deputy in the office of the tax collector. He then entered the employ of the old National Bank of Visalia as a bookkeeper. His close attention to his duties and the readiness with which he mastered many of the problems of banking, led to his being advanced to the position of assistant cashier. When the National Bank ofVisalia was merged with the Bank of Italy, Mr. Michels was continued as assistant cashier of the new institution, which place he still occupies, together with being assistant secretary and stockholder of an auxiliary corporation.

When the United States entered the great World War in the spring of 1917, Mr. Michels was assigned to the work of acting as interpreter for the draft board, where he continued for eight months, being at the time in the service of the United States army. Subsequently he spent eight months at Camp Lewis, in the state of Washington, but did not get overseas. Politically he is an unswerving republican and in the presidential campaign of 1924 was district captain for his party. 

Mr. Michels was married to Miss Ruth Olmstead of Pomona, California, a teacher in the Visalia high school, and they have one son: John L. Mr. Michels is prominent in fraternal circles, being a Master Mason, exalted ruler of the Visalia Lodge of Elks, a member of the Loyal Order of Moose and the American Legion. He is also president of the Kiwanis Club and is active in the promotion of all movements having for their object the advancement of the material interests of Visalia and Tulare county. He is likewise interested in ranching and finds his recreation on the farm.

NATHAN M BALL

Among the street and highway building contractors who in recent years have done much toward the improvement of the great system of highways which adds so greatly to the pleasure of travel throughout this section of California, it is believed there is none who has contributed more largely to that desirable end than has Nathan M. Ball, the well known cement contractor in Porterville and an acknowledged expert of long experience in his line. Mr. Ball has been in the cement business in this state for years and is thoroughly conversant with local conditions and needs. During the period of his activities in Tulare county he has constructed no fewer than fifty miles of cement highway in this county, besides doing much similar contract work in Stanislaus and Fresno counties and street work in various of the cities hereabout besides Porterville, so that he has come to be one of the best known cement contractors in this section of the state. He formerly and for years had wide experience in Riverside and is  thus quite as familiar with conditions in that section of the state. He has a thoroughly up-to-date equipment for his work and is thus able to carry out his contracts in a workmanlike manner and with a minimum of delay.

Nathan M. Ball was born on a farm in Piatt county, in the western part of Illinois, July 19, 1868, and is a son of Dennis and Annie (Lowe) Ball, both now deceased, whose last days were spent in Illinois. Dennis Ball was a resident of California during the hectic days of the mining camps in the late '50s and was here during the period of the Civil War, driving wagon trains between Sacramento and Virginia City. He returned east and after his marriage settled on a farm in Piatt county, not far from the Mississippi river on the western border of Illinois. He lived to be seventy-seven years of age, his death and that of his wife occurring with but nine days intervening.

Reared on the home farm in Illinois, Nathan M. Ball acquired his early education in the little district school three miles from his home, walking this distance during the four months of the year then devoted to school purposes in that community. He remained on the home farm until he had attained his majority and then, with a desire to extend his scholastic attainments, he took a course in the college at Valparaiso, Indiana. When twenty-five years of age, in 1893, Mr. Ball came to California and in Riverside was associated with the operations of the Gage Canal Company, contractors in repair work. While in Riverside he became prominently connected with cement construction work, a large stockholder in the Concrete Pipe & Cement Company, which had a plant in Riverside and one in Porterville. In 1908 Mr. Ball became personally and actively connected with the operations of the Porterville plant of this company and when in 1920 this concern's affairs were liquidated he bought the company's interests centering in the Porterville section, discontinued there the manufacture of cement pipe, and has since been giving his whole attention to cement construction work, with particular reference to street and highway construction, and has done very well; as noted above, having done a large percentage of the public work in this line carried out here within recent years. Mr. Ball is an active and influential member of the Porterville Chamber of Commerce and takes a good citizen's interest in the general affairs of the community. He has well appointed offices in the Masonic building.

In 1895, in Bement ,Illinois, Mr. Ball was united in marriage to Miss Clara A. Finnegan of Chicago, Illinois, and they have seven children: Irvin, Ruth, Stanley, Gordon, Blanche, Vernon and Mildred. During the time of this country's participation in the World War Irvin Ball rendered service in the quartermaster department of the United States Navy. The Balls are republicans and Mr. Ball is a member of the fraternal order of the Knights of Pythias and of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

COBB & DOFFLEMYER

The firm of Cobb & Dofflemyer of Exeter, California, was formed in 1914 for the purpose of engaging in the business of packing and shipping oranges. It is composed of J. G. Cobb and W. T. Doffiemyer, each of whom was interested in the fruit growing industry as the owner of orange orchards and vineyards. During the packing season Mr. Cobb acts as outside man, looking after the delivery of the fruit to the packing house on time, where Mr. Dofflemyer attends to the office work. The firm handles about three hundred carloads of fruit annually.

J. G. Cobb, a son of Joseph and Mary (Crawford) Cobb, was born in Knoxville, Tennessee. His parents were both natives of New York state and returned to that state when their son was only about six months old. In 1888 they went to Denver, Colorado, and six years later located in Los Angeles. J. G. Cobb received a good public school education and all his active life he has been interested in the fruit business. From 1912 to 1922 he was the Tulare county representative of the Earl Fruit Company, besides having his interest in his own firm during the greater part of that time. He is a member of the Exeter Chamber of Commerce and belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He married Miss Margaret Rucker of San Jose, whose family was one of the oldest in the Santa Clara valley. Mr. Cobb resides on the state highway near Merryman, where he has a fine twenty-acre orange orchard. He also owns a ten-acre orange grove near Porterville and a tract of land near Bakersfield.

W. T. Doffiemyer was born in Pueblo, Colorado, December 7, 1888. His parents, T. J. and Minnie (Robertson) Doffiemyer, removed to Los Angeles in 1890, where the father had extensive real estate interests. He also owned several hundred acres of land in Tulare county, well adapted to raising grapes and citrus fruits. After graduating from the University of California, W. T. Dofflemyer located in Exeter and two years later entered into the partnership with Mr. Cobb. He is especially interested in citrus fruits, while his brother, L. L. Dofflemyer, looks after the vineyards. Mr. Doffiemyer belongs to the Kiwanis Club and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mrs. DOfflemyer was formerly Miss Josephine McIntosh, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland. She is an active member of the Exeter Women's Club. They have two children: Frances and Robert.

WILLIAM W COLLINS

William W. Collins, probation officer of Tulare county, California, is a native of the Buckeye state, born in Coshocton county, Ohio. In the spring of 1873 he came with his parents, A. O. and Sarah J. Collins, to California. In May of that year they left the train at Tipton, Tulare county, and made the remainder of the journey to Bakersfield by stage. There the father embarked in the butcher business. While the railroad was being built through the mountains he supplied the construction camps with meat. He then disposed of his meat market in Bakersfield and during the remainder of his active business life was engaged in cattle raising. The last ten years of his life were spent in retirement. Both parents are deceased.

William W. Collins was educated in the grammar schools of Kern county, the Visalia Normal School and later the State Normal School at Los Angeles. Upon leaving school he located in Inyo county, California, where for three years he was interested in the live stock business. In 1889 he came to Tulare county, and here for the next nine years he was employed as a farm foreman by J. Goldman. Being a republican in this political affiliations, during the time he was employed by Mr. Goldman he formed the acquaintance of the leaders of that party in Tulare county, took an active part in local political affairs, and was frequently chosen as a delegate to county and state conventions. In 1902 he was elected to the office of sheriff for a term of four years and was twice reelected, holding the office for twelve years, the longest of any incumbent up to the present time. Shortly after the expiration of his third term (in September, 1915), he was appointed probation officer by the judge of the juvenile court. The appointment was confirmed by the board of county supervisors and this position he still holds.

While a resident of Inyo county Mr. Collins was married to Miss Louise Clarke, a native of California, and to this marriage were born three daughters: Hazel M. is a postgraduate of the University of California and a teacher in the Napa (California) high school; Blanche M. graduated from Mills College of Oakland, California, after which she prepared herself for library work by taking a course in the Children's Library of the Carnegie Library Institute of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Vera Louise died in 1915, aged eighteen years. Mr. Collins has forty acres in orchard, east of Exeter, and also owns other lands. Mr. Collins is a member in good standing of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and the Woodmen of the World.

ROY N FULLER, M D

Dr. Roy N. Fuller, proprietor of the San Joaquin Hospital in Tulare; a veteran of the World War; and for fifteen years and more a practicing physician in that city; one of the best known members of the medical profession in this section of the state, is a native of California, a member of one of the real pioneer families. He was born in Lincoln, Placer county, November 2, 1885, a son of Dr. George W. and Jeannette (Newton) Fuller, who were born on adjacent ranches in that same county, the latter a daughter of Hollis Newton, who was one of California's '49ers. Dr. George W. Fuller also was a son of a '49er, his father, Richard Fuller, having come into this state from New York, in the year of the great gold rush and presently establishing himself in Placer county, becoming one of the substantial pioneers of that section of the state. In 1887 Dr. George W. Fuller was graduated from Cooper Medical College, now the medical department of Stanford University, and became engaged in practice in San Francisco, where he remained until his death, which occurred in 1907.

Born in Lincoln and reared in San Francisco, Roy N. Fuller completed his early education in the high school of the latter city and early began the study of medicine. After proper preparation along that line he entered Cooper Medical College at San Francisco and was graduated from that institution in 1908, with the degree of M. D. For about three years following his graduation Dr. Fuller rendered service as an interne in Lane Hospital and in St. Luke's Hospital in San Francisco, there acquiring some extremely valuable practical experience, particularly in surgery. In 1910 he established himself in practice in Tulare, where he ever since has been located, with present offices in the Advance building. Upon his arrival in Tulare, Dr. Fuller entered into partnership with Dr. T. D. Blodgett and this mutually agreeable arrangement was continued until the death of Dr. Blodgett in 1919, since which time Dr. Fuller has been practicing independently. When this country took a hand in the World War in the spring of 1917 Dr. Fuller enlisted his services in behalf of the Medical Corps of the army and was in service until the close of the war, on duty at Lettermann Central Hospital at San Francisco. As a surgeon Dr. Fuller has a much wider than local reputation and as the proprietor of the San Joaquin Hospital at Tulare he has provided an institution for the community that has been of much service. This hospital is admirably equipped in up-to-date fashion and there the Doctor performs his major operations.

On October 21, 1914, in Tulare, Dr. Fuller was united in marriage to Miss Lena Hesse, who was born in Tulare county, daughter of Fred J. Hesse. Dr. and Mrs. Fuller have two daughters: Katherine and Rosamond. Dr. Fuller is a member of the Tulare County Medical Society, the California State Medical Association and the American Medical Association and in the deliberations of these learned bodies he takes a warm interest. He is a member of Tulare Post, No. 15, of the American Legion, in Tulare and is also a member of Visalia Lodge No. 1298, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

ROBERT LEE HILL

The Hill family may be classed as California pioneers. In 1852, when the state was but two years old, John and Melissa (Moore) Hill crossed the plains by the southern route with an ox team, meeting with the usual hardships undergone by the emigrants of that early period. They first located in San Diego, but not long afterward removed to San Juan, where Mr. Hill was engaged in mining. From San Juan they went to the northern part of the state and in 1857 located in Visalia, where they passed the remainder of their lives on a farm. Mrs. Hill died in 1874 and her husband survived until 1908, when he passed away at the ripe old age of eighty-seven years.

Robert Lee Hill, a son of this pioneer couple, was born in Tulare county, California, May 29, 1871. His boyhood was passed on his father's farm. He attended the country schools until he reached the eighth vale, but the greater part of his education was acquired in the great school of experience. At the age of sixteen years he found employment as a cowboy and for the next six years followed that occupation, "riding the plains." Locating then near Visalia, he was occupied during the next five years as a road grader. He then spent a similar period in the saw mill business, after which he served eleven years as marshal and constable in the town of Dinuba ,California. In 1923 he was elected sheriff of the county for a term of four years.

Mr. Hill married Miss Lucy Russell, a native of Merced, California, and they have seven children: Edna is now Mrs. Heinbach; Roberta is in Los Angeles; Ruth is Mrs. Conrad; Shirley, John E. and Lelland are attending school; and Glenn Allen is at home. Mr. and Mrs. Hill have one grandchild. Mr. Hill is a democrat in his political affiliations, but in his race for sheriff his well known public spirit, his interest in all local affairs and his personality doubtless won him many votes from the opposition. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he is a past noble grand, and he also belongs to the Woodmen of the World. As most of his active life has been spent in the great out-of-doors, he is fond of hunting and fishing, in which he finds his recreation.

CHARLES FELTON BURR

Charles Felton Burr, mayor of the city of Lindsay, California, and head of a large fruit-packing and shipping plant, was born in Menlo Park, San Mateo county, California, May 6, 1876. His father, John Burr, was a native of Scotland and came to California in the '50s via Cape Horn. About the same time a Scotch lassie named Annie Philpot also made the voyage via Cape Horn and landed in California, where she became the wife of John Burr, who was a gardener in Scotland before coming to the United States. For fourteen years he followed that occupation in Menlo Park, in the employ of ex-United States Senator Charles N. Felton. He then spent two years in Goshen, at the end of which time he located in San Fernando, Los Angeles county, where he bought a tract of land and established a nursery. He was elected sheriff of Los Angeles county and was the first man to hold that office for a term of four years. His death occurred in 1913 on the ranch in San Fernando, where his widow is still living.

Charles Felton Burr received a good public school education. In 1897 he accompanied his brother John to Lindsay and bought a ranch of one hundred and twenty-eight acres. They still own the same acreage, which is devoted to orange culture, and John still lives on the ranch. Another brother, William, lives with their mother in San Fernando. Charles lived on the ranch with his brother until 1908, when he became manager for the Randolph Fruit Company, packers and shippers. Six years later he went to the Joseph Digigeorgio Fruit Company as manager and started the citrus department for that company. In 1918 he bought the business, which he now conducts under the name of Charles F. Burr, Packer & Shipper. He handles as high as five hundred cars of citrus fruit every season.

Mr. Burr also owns an interest in a ninety-acre ranch, or orchard, in Los Angeles county, and a tract of one thousand, five hundred acres near Watsonville. He was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Lindsay, of which he was vice president for three years. He also assisted in the organization of the Lindsay Board of Trade (now the Chamber of Commerce), in which he is one of the directors, and is president of the Lindsay Mercantile Company, another concern he helped to establish. From these several business connections it can readily be seen that Mr. Burr is one of the live wires of Lindsay, ready to assume responsibilities for the good of the community, as well as for his personal benefit.

Since 1912 Mr. Burr has been one of the city trustees and he is now serving his second term as mayor of Lindsay. The first term as mayor Mr. Burr was appointed to fill out the unexpired term of Allen McGregor, who was appointed judge and resigned the office of mayor. As a public official he has displayed the same sound judgment, the same careful attention to details that have distinguished him in his private business affairs.

On August 21, 1901, Mr. Burr was married to Miss Elsie L. Hoyt, of San Fernando, and this union has been blessed with two sons Felton and Allen. Felton is married and is associated with his father in business. Allen is a student in the Fresno State College, where he has achieved quite a reputation as an athlete, his most notable record being in the high jump. Mr. Burr is a republican in politics. Fraternally he is a member of the Woodmen of the World and he has been the ruling spirit of the Lindsay camp of that order for the past fourteen years. He is also a Mason and belongs to the Elks in Porterville.

A W McWHINNIE

Tulare county's sanitary inspector, A. W. McWhinnie, was born in the city of New York, February 16, 1876. When he was about three years of age his parents, Dr. John Wallace and Hellen A'Dell (Scofield) McWhinnie, came to California and located in Petaluma. There the father practiced his profession with marked success until his death in 1885. The mother died the same year.

A. W. McWhinnie was educated in the public schools of Woodstock, Ontario, Canada. After completing his schooling, he started in to learn the drug business, and graduated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy. Returning to California, he was employed in a drug store in San Rafael until the breaking out of the Spanish-American war in 1898. He then enlisted in the Eighth California Volunteer Infantry and served until the close of the war. Upon receiving his discharge he resumed work in his profession until 1918, when he was appointed to his present position of county sanitary inspector. In the meantime he had become a resident of Visalia in 1913.

Mr. McWhinnie is a republican in his political convictions and while in Solana county he held the position of under-sheriff for one year. He is a past exalted ruler in the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and a member of the United Spanish War Veterans. In the last named organization he is a past commander of Henry W. Lawton Camp No. 1, at Vallejo, California. He is unmarried and finds his recreation in the study of mechanics, a subject in which he is deeply interested.

BEN M MADDOX

Among the citizens of Visalia, California, who have been active in the industrial and commercial development of the city is Ben M. Maddox, resident manager of the San Joaquin district of the Southern California Edison Company. He was born in Chattooga county, Georgia, October 18, 1859. His parents, George B. T. and Sarah (Dickson) Maddox, were both natives of that state and members of well known southern families. He made his home in Georgia until he was about seventeen years of age, attending the local schools, where he received a good practical education. In 1877 he started in life for himself, going to Texas, where he spent some time in hunting buffalo on the plains. He then went to Arizona and from the spring of 1878 to February, 1879, was engaged in mining.

In February, 1879, in company with two friends, with one pack horse and one saddle horse, the little party of three left Prescott, Arizona, for California. The overland journey was uneventful and in due time they arrived at the mining camp of Bodie, Mono county, where Mr. Maddox found employment on a newspaper. Subsequently he was similarly engaged in Mammoth city, in the same county. Abandoning newspaper work, he engaged in mining, first in Mammoth city and in 1880 in Fresno Flats, where he was employed in the Enterprise mine. Here he also clerked in a hotel for a time. In September, 1881, he went to Mariposa and became a compositor on the Gazette. The following year he went to San Francisco, where he was employed on the Chronicle, but he returned to Mariposa in October, 1882, and accepted a position with the Herald. Later in the same year he purchased the paper and continued to publish it for about four years. In 1886 he sold the Herald and went to Tulare county, with the intention of purchasing the Tulare Register. Circumstances prevented the carrying out of that plan and he returned to San Francisco to resume work at the printer's trade, but for a short time only, as in October, 1886, he was appointed deputy clerk of the Supreme court, a position which required his entire time and attention.

On Thanksgiving Day of 1890 a hope which Mr. Maddox had long cherished was realized. At that time he became the owner of the Visalia Times, which he conducted as a weekly for more than a year, but on February 22, 1892, the Times was changed to a daily. He continued the publication of the Daily Times until he became associated with the Mount Whitney Power Company, which was later absorbed by the Southern California Edison Company, and the paper was taken over by his son, Morley M. Maddox.

When the Mount Whitney Power Company was organized in 1899, Mr. Maddox was chosen as a member of the board of directors. In 1900 he became secretary and on September 9, 1902, he was made business manager. He has also served as a director of the Visalia Electric Railroad Company; president of the Encina Fruit Company; president of the Evansdale Fruit Company, and as chairman for the county in the routing of the State Highway through Tulare county. In connection with William H. Hammond he organized and put on the market the Lindsay Heights and Nob Hill orange colonies.

Politically Mr. Maddox is a democrat. In 1894 he was nominated by his party for secretary of state, but was defeated with the rest of the ticket. He has served his party for several terms as chairman of the county central committee, and for two terms he was secretary of the democratic state central committee. Mr. Maddox is prominent in Masonic circles, being a Knight Templar, a thirty-second degree Mason in the Scottish Rite and a Noble of Islam Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a Knight of Pythias and a member of the Woodmen of the World. In all these fraternal bodies he is popular because of his sterling worth and genial disposition.

On March 15, 1883, in Mariposa, California, Mr. Maddox and Miss Evalina J. Farnsworth were united in marriage. To this union there have been born five children: Morley M., Hazel C., Ruth E., Dickson F. and Ben M., Jr. Mr. Maddox is a member of the local advisory board of the Pacific Southwest Trust & Savings Bank of Visalia.

NEWTON O BROWN

Newton O. Brown, dealer in furniture and one of the best known merchants of the city of Porterville, a member of the common council of that city and in other ways an active and influential factor in its civic and commercial life and that of the community at large, is a Hoosier by birth but has been for nearly twenty years a resident of California and is thus thoroughly familiar with interests and conditions here and an enthusiastic promoter of those interests. He was born one farm in Wayne county, Indiana, October 5, 1876, and is a son of W. M. and Rebecca (Dwire) Brown, the latter of whom is still living, now making her home in Decatur. The late W. M. Brown was a well-to-do farmer and stockman. He died in 1903.

Reared on the home farm in Indiana, Newton O. Brown acquired his education in the rural schools in the neighborhood of his home  and supplemented this by a course in the commercial college at Lima, Ohio. He then became a bookkeeper in a commercial establishment at VanWert, Ohio, and a year later engaged in department store work in Laurel, Iowa, and was for ten years in the merchandising business in that state, or until 1908, when he came to California and in Turlock, Stanislaus county, became connected with the mercantile operations of Osborne & Son, proprietors of a general store in that city, continuing this association for ten years, and then in 1918, in association with his brother, J. M. Brown, he became established in the furniture business in Portervine, a line which he since has followed. In 1923 Mr. Brown bought his brother's interest in the store and has since been carrying on the business independently and is doing very well, proprietor of an admirably equipped and adequately stocked furniture store at No. 209 Main street, where he has all the goods essential to the needs in that line of the fine trade area centering in Porterville. Mr. Brown is a republican and has come to be regarded as one of the leaders of that party in this county. He finds time amid the exactions of his commercial business to give a good citizen's attention to the city's general civic interests and is now (1925) representing his ward as a member of the city common council. During the time of his residence in Iowa, Mr. Brown also took a hearty interest in the civic affairs of that state and rendered public service in certain local capacities.

On December 19, 1902, in Decatur, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Fleming, who also was born in Indiana, and they have one child: a daughter, Altice Carroll Brown. The Browns are members of the Christian church and Mr. Brown is a member of the local camp of the Modern Woodmen of America.

JOSHUA MILTON HADLEY

The undertaking business of Hadley & Locey of Visalia, is one oi the oldest concerns in the city. It was established about 1888, though the present firm is of comparatively recent origin. Joshua M. Hadley, the senior member, was born in Beaver City, Nebraska, September 3, 1886. His father, Manley R. Hadley, was a native of Iowa, and his mother, whose maiden name was Ella Grible, was born in West Virginia. The former crossed the Missouri river from Iowa to Nebraska in his boyhood. He and two associates founded the town of Beaver City, at that time the farthest west of any town in the state. He was a typical son of the Great West, served for some time as a scout and interpreter with William F. Cody, better known as "Buffalo Bill", and later became actively identified with the affairs of Furnas county, Nebraska. His family consisted of three sons and three daughters.

Joshua Milton Hadley was educated in the public schools of his home town. Owing to the financial reverses of his father he was compelled to become a bread-winner before he had an opportunity to complete his schooling. He came with his parents to California and for two years lived in Whittier. He then went to Lindsay, where he found employment as clerk in a grocery store. A little later, in 1906, he formed a partnership with his father-in-law in the furniture and undertaking business in Lindsay. They sold out in 1910, but Mr. Hadley repurchased the establishment. In 1919 he was elected coroner. In order to conduct the business of the office properly, it was almost necessary for him to be at the county seat and in 1920 he became a citizen of Visalia.

Upon locating in Visalia he entered into partnership with Mr. Locey. Their place of business at No. 410 West Center street, is considered one of the best undertaking concerns on the Pacific coast, being supplied with the most modern equipment and provided with a chapel for holding funeral ceremonies. Mr. Hadley was reelected coroner in 1922, which is an evidence of his popularity in the county. He is prominent in fraternal circles, being a Royal Arch Mason, a Knight of Pythias, an Elk, a Woodman of the World, an Eagle, and a Moose. He is also a member of the Rotary Club and a director of the Visalia Chamber of Commerce. He has five children: Thelma; Dorothy and Dudley (twins); J. Milton; and Burgess. He is fond of outdoor life and spends his vacations in hunting and fishing.

DE WITT MONTGOMERY

Few men in the last quarter of a century have done more to improve the public schools and elevate the educational standards of California than De Witt Montgomery, superintendent of the Visalia city schools. He was born in Eaton Rapids, Michigan, October 29, 1872. His parents, Alonzo and Cornelia (Dunham) Montgomery, came to California in 1894 and located in Fullerton, where the father became interested in fruit culture. The mother is still living.

De Witt Montgomery received his initial education in the public schools of his native state. After coming to California he finished high school at Fullerton. then spent five years in Stanford University at Palo Alto, from which he was graduated in 1901, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The following year he received his Master's degree, being an instructor in English during his last year in the institution. He then went to Gridley, Butte county, where he was principal of the high school for one year. The next three and a half years he spent as principal of the Union high school of Sonoma, when he was elected county superintendent of schools for Sonoma county. Preferring other school work to that of superintendent, he held this office only one term of four years, then became the head of the Senior and Junior high schools, as well as the Junior College at Santa Rosa. Altogether he was engaged in educational work in Sonoma county from 1903 to 1919, when he came to Visalia to accept his present position.

On June 27, 1903, Mr. Montgomery was married to Miss Neva Gilfillan of Salinas, and they have two children: De Witt, Jr., and Anne. Mr. Montgomery has a vineyard of twenty acres, two and a half miles southwest of Exeter. Mr. Montgomery is a member of the California State Teachers Association and the National Education Association. Through these organizations, and by reading educational journals, he keeps in close touch with the general progress of the schools of the country. During his six years inVisalia he has done much to awaken an interest in education and has been otherwise influential in promoting the general interests of the city. He is a member of the Rotary Club and is a republican in his political views.

RAYMOND INGALLS CARRUTHERS

Raymond Ingalls Carruthers, district manager for the Southern California Edison Company in the Visalia district, is a native of the Hawkeye state, born in Indianola, Iowa, July 9, 1885. His parents, John Howard and Clara Emily (Ingalls) Carruthers, were born and married in Iowa. They came to California in 1895. Mr. Carruthers was a graduate of the law department of the University of Iowa and practiced his profession in Iowa. His widow is still living. They had two children: Raymond Ingalls  and a daughter who died in infancy.

Raymond Ingalls Carruthers was educated in the public schools of California and the high school of San Bernardino. His ambition was to attend Princeton University, but circumstances prevented him from carrying out the plan. In 1904, before he was old enough to vote, he was for seven months attached to the staff of George H. Cortelyou and Frank H. Hitchcock, members of the Republican National committee from New York. His association with these party leaders strengthened his faith in the principles advocated by the republican party, with which he has been affiliated since reaching his majority, though he has never been an aspirant for public honors.

Shortly after the political campaign of 1904, Mr. Carruthers came toCalifornia and was engaged in business as a ranchman in Los Angeles county until the spring of 1910. On May 12, 1910, he entered the employ of the Southern California Edison Company as a light salesman, or contracting agent, in the city of Pasadena. About a year later he was transferred to Los Angeles as a light and power salesman, confining his activities to the business and manufacturing districts. In 1917 he was sent to Pomona to make contracts for power and on February 1, 1918, he was made district manager at Visalia. 

Since locating in Visalia, Mr. Carruthers has identified himself with practically every agency for the promotion of the general interests of the city. He is a member of the Commercial Club, a director of the Rotary Club, has been a director of the Chamber of Commerce for the past four years and is chairman of the improvement committee of that organization. His experience as a light and power salesman brought him into contact with the leading business men in the various cities where he was employed. In his conversations with these men he gained many progressive ideas concerning municipal government and civic affairs, and these ideas aid him to advance the material welfare of Visalia, as well as the interests of the corporation which he represents as district manager. His successive transfers and promotions by the Edison company bear witness to his capability and trustworthiness.

In Los Angeles, Mr. Carruthers found a congenial companion in the person of Miss Rowena Potts, daughter of F. W. Potts of that city, and they were happily married. Four children have come to bless their union: Jane, John Ingalls, Sue Virginia and James W.

ORVEL SCHELLING

Among the business men of Exeter ,California, Orvel Schelling, proprietor of Schelling's grocery, is an example of a self-made man, one who began at the bottom of the ladder and worked his way upward by sheer industry and close attention to whatever he had in hand. He was born in Exeter in 1886. His parents, J. E. and Mattie (Wilson) Schelling, came to Exeter as young people, the former from Kansas and the latter from Arkansas. J. E. Schelling followed the occupation of ranch man for years and is now living retired in Exeter. His wife died in 1923.

Orvel Schelling received a public school education and at the age of fourteen years began clerking in a grocery, in which line of business he has been occupied since that tithe. With the exception of one year in Bakersfield and eight years in Visalia, his entire business career has been passed in his native city. In 1918 he acquired a financial interest in the Hahn-Livingston grocery and was made manager. On January 1, 1925, he purchased the interests of the other partners and became sole owner. His long experience has taught him how to study the demands of the trade and it is no disparagement of his competitors to say he has one of the best stocked grocery houses in Exeter and enjoys a large patronage.

Mrs. Schelling, who is active in the work of the Exeter Women's Club, was formerly Miss Mabel Fitzpatrick of Exeter. Mr. Schelling is a member of the Exeter Chamber of Commerce, the Kiwanis Club and the Boy Scouts Council. In fact, he is one of the charter members of the Kiwanis Club. His well known public spirit and his liberal support of all worthy charities, as well as his interest in municipal affairs, led to his being elected a member of the city council in April, 1921, for a term of four years.

GEORGE A O'BRIEN

Among the commercial and industrial features of the city of Porterville there are several establishments that are entitled to more than passing notice by reason of their excellent character. One of these is the bakery of G. A. O'Brien at No. 127 Main street, an establishment which is considered one of the best of its kind in this section of California and which serves to supply the trade throughout a wide district in this fine trade area. Mr. O'Brien has been established in business in Porterville for something More than ten years and during that time has built up a business which marks him as among the leaders in his line in this region. Starting in a modest way with a small oven and one baker, he has found the quality of his products has caused a normal expansion of the business until he has gradually increased his facilities to the point that now requires the services of no fewer than sixteen persons in his bakery. Mr. O'Brien's enterprise and alertness to the needs of his trade are attested by the fact that he installed in his bakery in Porterville the first three-hundred-and-sixty-loaf electric oven set up in the state of California. It is needless to say that the other equipment of his establishment is in keeping with this and that he thus has one of the best equipped and most up-to-date bakery plants in this section of the state. He serves from this plant the trade needs of all the towns and villages in the Porterville area and the popularity of the products of his ovens attests their excellence. George A. O'Brien is a native of the old Green Mountain state but has been a resident of California since the days of his young manhood. He was born on a farm in the immediate vicinity of the fine old town of Waterbury, Washington county, Vermont, not far down the state from the birthplace of President Coolidge, in the near-by county of Windsor, March 7, 1887, a son of James and Nancy (O'Neill) O'Brien, both of whom are still living there in comfortable retirement.

Reared on the home farm, George A. O'Brien finished his education. in the Waterbury high school and remained at home until he was nineteen years of age when, in 1906, he came to California and in Oakland became employed in a bakery, learning there the rudiments of a vocation in which he has achieved a distinctive success. In the next year (1907) he left Oakland and became located in Santa Cruz, where he set up a bake shop and was in business at that place until 1915, when he moved to Porterville and in this latter city set up an establishment which, as noted above, has gradually developed until now it is one of the leading bakeries here-about. In connection with his extensive wholesale trade, covering this region, Mr. O'Brien also maintains a local retail store and the contents of his shelves and cases are widely distributed throughout the city. Everything connected with this bakery in the way of operative equipment is electrical, and the highest modern standards are maintained in these operations.

On September 10, 1921, in Porterville, Mr. O'Brien was united in marriage to Miss Loretta Meighan, who at that time was a teacher of languages in the Porterville schools. They have one child: A daughter, Mary Patricia. Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien are members of the Roman Catholic church and are democrats. Mr. O'Brien is a member of the local council of the Knights of Columbus and is also affiliated with the local lodge of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

PHILIP GAFVERT

Philip Gafvert, former cashier of the old Pioneer Bank of Porterville and present manager of the Porterville branch of the Pacific-Southwest Trust & Savings Bank of Los Angeles, one of the best known and most influential bankers in this section of the state, is a native son of California and his been a resident of this state all his life. He was born in the city of San Francisco, May 2, 1877, and is a son of Alfred and Sarah (Johnson) Gafvert, the former of whom is still living, now making his home in Soquel, Santa Cruz county. The mother passed away in September, 1920. Alfred Gafvert is a native of the kingdom of Sweden who came to this country in the days of his youth and became a resident of the city of Chicago, living there at the time of the great fire which destroyed the larger part of that city in 1871. Two years later, in 1873, he came to California and after a sometime residence in the city of San Francisco, became established on a ranch in Santa Cruz county. There he resided until 1923, when he sold his ranch and now resides with his son, Louis J., in Soquel.

Reared on the home ranch in Santa Cruz county, Philip Gafvert acquired his education in the neighborhood schools and for four seasons during his vacation periods worked in a box and shingle factory. In 1896, then being nineteen years of age, he entered the employ of the Southern Pacific Railway Company, starting in as a clerk in the transportation department of that company's offices in Hanford. While thus engaged he learned railway telegraphing and for some time served as relief telegrapher at various stations along the line of the Southern Pacific. In 1899 he was made clerk and telegrapher in the company's offices at Mojave and was presently promoted to the position of cashier in that office, a position he occupied until 1905, when he was transferred to the company's Ventura office as assistant agent and operator, and was there occupied until 1909, when he was assigned to the Visalia agency. It was thus that in 1909 Mr. Gafvert became a resident of Tulare county and he never has had cause to regret the step in his progress that brought him to this county. He remained with the railway people until February 4, 1911, when he entered the employ of the old Pioneer Bank of Porterville and thus became connected with the banking interests of this county. By gradual promotion Mr. Gafvert was advanced in the service of that bank until in 1915 he was made its assistant cashier. In 1921 he was promoted to the position of cashier and when on January 1, 1924, the Pioneer Bank was taken over by the Pacific-Southwest Trust & Savings Bank of Los Angeles he was made manager of the branch of this latter financial institution's activities thus created in Porterville, and has since been serving in that important and responsible capacity.

On September 10, 1901, in Porterville, Mr. Gafvert was united in marriage to Miss Myrtle McCalister, who was born in Kansas, daughter of George McCalister, but who was reared in Porterville. Mr. and Mrs. Gafvert have one child: a daughter, Agnes N. Gafvert. Mr. and Mrs. Gafvert are affiliated with the Presbyterian-Congregational church and are republicans. During the time of this country's participation in the World War Mr. Gafvert was an active figure in the labors connected with the various government loan drives and rendered effective service in that behalf. He is a member of the local lodge of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

THOMAS J BLACK

Thomas J. Black, who is the proprietor of the Jack & Jeff Transfer Company of Visalia, California, was born on a farm in the state of Ohio, August 1, 1873. His parents, Francis and Clara (Dysert) Black, have both joined the silent majority. The mother passed the closing days of her life in the city of Los Angeles.

Thomas J. Black received his education in the grade schools. Upon leaving school he took up the occupation of miner, which he followed for fourteen years at various places in California, with two years in the Nevada mines. He was then for six years employed in the oil fields at Taft and in 1914 came to Visalia. His first business venture here was in the ice and fuel business, in which he was measurably successful. In 1916 he saw an opportunity to engage in the trucking and transfer business and then established his present company. He has a fleet of seven trucks and constantly employs five men on "long and short hauls." In addition he conducts a storage warehouse and has won a reputation for promptness and reliability.

Some years ago Miss Josephine Hurst became the wife of Mr. Black and they have two sons: Claude and Thomas J., Jr. Mr. Black is a republican in his political affiliations, but has never been especially active in public affairs in the sense of being a candidate for public preferment. His fraternal relations are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he is a member in good standing. Although his business interests require his entire time and attention, he maintains an interest in the general welfare of Visalia and Tulare county.

RALPH E WOLF

One of the best known business men of Lindsay, California, is R. E. Wolf, cashier, manager and one of the principal stockholders in the Lindsay Savings Bank. He is a native of Oregon, born in McMinnville, on September 24, 1889, a son of Samuel L. and Dorothy (Spray) Wolf, the former a native of Ohio and the latter (now deceased). of Indiana. The father went to Oregon in 1886 and lived there for twelve years, when he came to California and engaged in fruit culture in Lindsay. In 1919 he removed to Galt, where he still resides.

Ralph E. Wolf obtained a good public school education and began his business career as a clerk in a store. He followed this occupation in various mercantile establishments until 1909, when he entered the employ of the First National Bank of Lindsay as a bookkeeper. Here he found a field to his liking and worked his way up until in 1916 he was made assistant cashier of the Lindsay Savings Bank, then affiliated with the First National. In 1920 he was made cashier. Since then he has become cashier, one of the leading stockholders, one of the board of directors and manager. The president is Ernest L. Daniels; vice president, D. O. Bishop.

On December 24, 1907, Mr. Wolf was married to Miss Darl E. Wright of Whittier, California, and they have three children: Berenice, Mildred and Wayne. They attend the Baptist church and in politics Mr. Wolf is a republican. Mr. Wolf is president of the Chamber of Commerce, to which office he was elected in October, 1924. He was appointed city treasurer to fill an unexpired term in October, 1923, and was elected for a full term in April, 1924. He is treasurer of the Lindsay Masonic Lodge and is active in the good works of that order.

ORVAL OVERALL

Since July, 1923, Orval Overall has occupied the important position of appraiser for the Pacific' Southwest Trust & Savings Bank of Visalia. He was born in Farmersville, Tulare county, California, February 2, 1881, and is a grandson of one of the old "forty-niners." (See sketch of his father elsewhere in this volume).

After attending the grammar and high schools of Visalia, Orval Overall enrolled as a student in the University of California, where he completed the four-year course. While in the university he was a prominent figure in athletics, achieving the distinction of being captain of both the baseball and football teams in the same year the only student ever thus honored. Upon leaving the university he joined the Tacoma Baseball Club, in the Pacific Coast League. The next year he went to the Cincinnati (Ohio) Club, where he remained one year, when he joined the Chicago National League Club (commonly called the Cubs) as a pitcher. While he was a member of this club the Cubs won four pennants in the National League and two World's Series championships, much of which was due to Overall's pitching ability.

When he gave up professional baseball Mr. Overall was engaged for two years in mining and was then for a similar period in the employ of the Maier Brewing Company of Los Angeles. He then came back to his native county of Tulare and was occupied in ranching until July, 1923, when he came into his present position. The Pacific Southwest Trust & Savings Bank has eight branches and Mr. Overall does the appraising for all of them. These branches are all in Tulare and Kings counties.

In 1907, in Chicago, Mr. Overall and Miss Ethel M. Hinson were united in marriage. Mr. Overall belongs to both the York and Scottish rites in Masonry, and is also a Noble of the Mystic Shrine and a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

WATSON S CLAWSON

Watson S. Clawson, owner and proprietor of the Exeter (California) Sun, is a native of the Keystone state, born in Blairsville,I ndiana county, December 24, 1892. His parents, Adam and Mildred (Moorehead) Clawson, were representatives of old families of Pennsylvania. For many years the father was a mill worker, but is now living retired.

Watson S. Clawson received a good common school education. While still in his early teens he went into a printing office and began learning to set type. With the exception of three years since then his energies have all been directed to the printing and publishing business. One of these three years he was in a glass factory and the other two he was in the employ of the Mellon estate of Pittsburgh. In 1911 he came to California. After a short time in Los Angeles he came to Exeter, where he was foreman in the mechanical department of the Tribune for two years. In 1913 he embarked in the job printing business. About two years later he bought the Exeter Sun and combined it with his job business. He now owns the property in which the Sun is published and has a well equipped plant. The Sun is issued weekly and has a circulation of about one thousand copies.

Mr. Clawson was married to Miss Lefa Ray Crookshank, whose father was one of the pioneer ranchmen near Exeter. Mr. Crookshank was for many years a teacher in high schools of Tulare county and served for eight years as county superintendent of schools. Mrs. Clawson is a talented musician and was a music teacher prior to her marriage and still gives lessons to a selected few who receive high school credit from their instructor, as Mrs. Clawson is an accredited teacher in Tulare county. As an accompanist on the piano her services are in demand in church and concert work. Mr. and Mrs. Clawson occupy a comfortable home in Exeter and have four children: Samuel R., James M., Nancy E., and Watson Phillip. Mr. Clawson is a charter member of the Exeter Commercial and Kiwanis Clubs and is vice president of the Chamber of Commerce. He was one of the youngest who served as master of his blue lodge and is also a Royal Arch Mason, a Modern Woodmen of America, and belongs to the Order of Sciots.

History of Tulare County California: By Kathleen Edwards Small
History of Kings County, California: By J Larry Smith
Volume 1 - Chicago - The S J Clarke Publishing Co, 1926

Transcribed by: Martha A Crosley Graham, Pages: 252-371


Biography Pages Created: 29 June 2009

Rights Reserved: 2017

Updated: 14 September 2017

 Biographies