Tulare County, California

Biographies
1926

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CAPTAIN FOREST HENRY LANCASHIRE

Captain Forest Henry Lancashire, a veteran of the World war, a civil and mechanical engineer of wide and varied experience and one of the best known and most successful horticulturists of Tulare county, proprietor of a fine orchard at Naranjo (Woodlake) and of one of the best equipped packing plants in the fruit region, is a native son of the old Wolverine state but his interests for many years have centered in the west and southwest and for the past ten years and more in California, he having taken hold in 1914 of the citrus holdings at Naranjo of the late Fred E. Harding, uncle of his wife. With characteristic energy Captain Lancashire has developed that property until now it is recognized as one of the best and most successfully operated ranches given to the growing of oranges and grapefruit in this region.

In the distribution of the Harding estate the Lancashire's received the home and the seventeen acres of oranges and grapefruit surrounding the same, also another six acres of citrus. This was in the fall of 1914. Captain Lancashire ran this property for the following season, doing all the work himself and investigating and studying the best methods of citrus culture in the process. The results were so satisfactory that first season that he decided to stay with the citrus business. That he has had no occasion to regret this decision his neighbors well know, for the success which has attended his efforts has gained for him a most gratifying measure of distinction in the best informed circles in the great industry he so conspicuously represents, a distinction that recently (June, 1925) was recognized by The California Citrograph, which gave over three of its pages to a review of Captain Lancashire's career as a grower and packer, with an interesting and informative description of the methods whereby this success was achieved, concluding with the statement that "the expansion citrus holdings from a few acres to one hundred within ten years, and the development of a noteworthy packing business at the same time well entitles the subject of this sketch to a position on the list of those who have achieved in the citrus industry."

With acknowledgment to the Citrograph article above referred to it may be stated that in the fall of 1915, a year after he had taken hold of his ranch here, Captain Lancashire leased a tract of eighteen nearby acres for a term of three years, which tract later was purchased. Three acres also were planted. Because he felt that he was not getting as good prices as his fruit should command in the market, Captain Lancashire decided to become a packer himself. There was on the ranch property a small packing house which years before had been in operation. This he decided to re-equip. His engineering experience here came in good stead and new equipment was installed efficiently and yet economically. The capacity of the house was such that he found he could handle some outside fruit. So during the season 1916-17 he packed and shipped about thirty cars of outside fruit, giving special care to the grading and to the appearance of the pack. As a result the fruit brought good prices and the packing business since then has grown consistently, with a present output of one hundred and fifty cars or more annually.

On the entrance of the United States into the World war in 1917 there was an immediate. call for engineers, as that department was organizing all of the special technical corps. Captain Lancashire immediately offered his services to the chief of engineers but was not called until in the spring of 1918. At that time he was commissioned a captain of engineers and was ordered to report to Camp Lee (Virginia) for military training, presently being transferred to the office of the chief of engineers at Washington for special duty on a confidential detail, while on this assignment serving as the executive officer in charge of a section having fourteen captains and various civilian employees. Not long before the collapse of the Teutonic forces Captain Lancashire succeeded in getting assigned to field troops, being sent to the Eleventh Division which at that time was being mobilized for embarkation overseas, and was made commander of Company B of the Two Hundred and Eleventh Engineers Sappers. The war was over before all of the division got to France and in December, 1918, Captain Lancashire secured his discharge and returned to California to take up his citrus work. In the following December (1919) the Captain's packing house' vas destroyed by fire and he then purchased the house of the Antelope Heights Orange Company, which he since has been successfully operating, at the same time continually expanding and developing his operations as a grower. In 1921 he purchased fifty-seven acres of young citrus orchard north of Wood lake, a few miles from his Naranjo holdings, and has there developed a fine piece of property. The Captain now owns one hundred and forty acres of orange and grapefruit orchards, is affiliated with the California Fruit Growers Exchange through his membership in the Central California Citrus Exchange, is also an active and influential member of the Woodlake Valley Chamber of Commerce and takes a proper interest in all movements and measures having to do with the promotion of the best interests of the community in which with pleasure he long ago elected to make his home, and to which he and Mrs. Lancashire are thoroughly devoted. 

Forest Henry Lancashire was born in the city of Detroit, Michigan, October 18, 1879, and is a son of Lawrence Henry and Josephine Mary (Conner) Lancashire, the latter of whom was a member of one of the oldest families of that historic old town, her grandfather, Richard Conner having settled there following his appointment in settlement days to the post of Indian agent in the old fort town. She was born on the site in that city now occupied by the plant of the Chalmers Motor Car Company. The Conner's of this line in America are descendants of that Conner who was one of the plucky adventurers in the train of Joliet and Pere Marquette, explorers of the Great Lakes country in the '70s of the seventeenth century. Lawrence Henry Lancashire, a native of England, came to this country in the days of his young manhood and located at Detroit, where after his marriage he established his home and spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1896. He became one of the leading merchants of Detroit and at the time of his death was vice president of the company operating the Mabley department store there. An instance of his enterprise in business is cited in the fact that he was the first merchant in the state of Michigan to employ billboard advertising.

Reared at Detroit amid an excellent social environment, Forest H. Lancashire was given every advantage in the way of schooling and in 1902 was graduated from the University of Michigan, majoring in engineering and earning the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Master of Engineering. Upon securing his diploma he became connected with the staff of the engineering firm of F. F. VanTyle & Company at Detroit, and in the next year (1903) was made construction engineer in the work of building the Davenport (Iowa) interurban electric railway. Upon the completion of these labors he was made general superintendent of the operations of the Davenport Gas and Electric Company and not long afterward was made consulting engineer of the Burlington Railway, Light and Power Company and later chief engineer and manager of construction of the Rock Island Southern Railway Company and was thus engaged until in June, 1906, when he went to Monterey, Mexico, as construction engineer in the operations of the Monterey Railway Company, in charge of the erection of light and power plants. Three years later he established offices in Dallas, Texas, as a consulting engineer and in that capacity had charge of various engineering projects in the southwest, including the construction of the Elk City waterworks, sewer system and street paving, the sewage reduction system at Oklahoma City, the lighting plant and sewers at Ryan and the plans for the waterworks at Foraker. He also superintended the construction of the storm water sewer system at Dallas, had charge of the engineering on the waterworks system at Hamilton, made a report on the municipal waterworks and lighting plant at Paris, Texas, and was actively connected with the work of construction or improvement of the waterworks, lighting plants and sewer systems of Georgetown and Corpus Christi in that same state. In 1914 Captain Lancashire returned to Monterey (Mexico) as efficiency engineer for the Monterey Railway, Light and Power Company and was thus engaged when Europe went to war in the late summer of that year. The combination of a World war and the revolution then going on in Mexico caused all operations to stop and with his family he returned to the States, losing most of his personal property in the transfer. On his arrival in St. Louis he came down with an attack of typhoid fever. About that time Mrs. Lancashire had fallen heir to a third interest in the citrus holdings in Tulare county of her uncle, Senator Fred A. Harding of Monmouth, Illinois, and upon his recovery he and his wife decided to come to California and settle upon this place at Naranjo. As set out above, they never have had occasion to regret the choice then made and they are very comfortably situated in their California home.

It was on May 26, 1906, at Monmouth, Illinois, that Forest H. Lancashire was united in marriage to Miss Lois Harding, a member of one of the old and influential families of that city, and they have one child, a daughter, Lois Justine, born in 1913. Captain and Mrs. Lancashire are republicans and take a proper interest in local civic affairs as well as in the general social and cultural activities of the community in which they live. The Captain is a member of the American Legion and takes an interested part in the activities of that patriotic organization. In 1906 he was elected a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, one of the youngest men ever achieving membership in that body, and is widely known in engineering circles. He is a member of the College fraternity, Theta Delta Chi.

JOHN WILLIAM RUTHERFORD

The life of John William Rutherford, enterprising rancher, and sexton of the Tulare county cemetery in Porterville, has been such as to elicit just praise from those who know him best, owing to the fact that he has always been true to the trusts reposed in him and has been up­right in his dealings with his fellowmen, at the same time lending his support to the advancement of any cause looking to the welfare of the community at large. He was born on the 13th day of August, 1872, in Castroville, Monterey County, California, and is the son of Samuel Theodore and Rebecca Jane (Kincaid) Rutherford. His parents were born and reared in the state of Missouri, but early in life they crossed the plains by ox team to California, the father making the trip in 1849 and the mother two years later. Samuel T. Rutherford became a pioneer rancher in the Pajaro valley, but later entered a homestead at Santa Maria. This land he afterward sold and pre-empted land near the Indian reservation, near Porterville.

John William Rutherford secured his education in the common schools, and his first active work was as a farm hand. For many years he was also engaged in conducting pack trains into the mountains east of Porterville. Eventually he became the owner of one four-acre and one acre and a half ranch east of Porterville, to which he has since given his attention. Here he gives special attention to the raising of fruit and has built a very comfortable and attractive modern residence. He is energetic and industrious and has been fairly successful in his work. In October, 1923, Mr. Rutherford was appointed sexton of the Tulare county cemetery, near Porterville, and this demands a fair share of his time. He is painstaking and reliable in his attention to the property under his care and his work thus far has received the approval and commendation of all who are acquainted with his efforts as caretaker of the cemetery.

In Visalia, on December 23, 1897, Mr. Rutherford was married to Miss Ivy McCutcheon, and they are the parents of seven children: Faudene, who is the wife of Peter Smith; and Ludd, Floyd, Bonnie, Nona, Lottie and Jack. All the members of this family are well known in the community where they reside and are deservedly popular in the social circles in which they move. Mr. and Mrs. Rutherford are republicans and are attendants at the Christian church. Mr. Rutherford is a member of the Masonic fraternity and his wife belongs to the Order of the Eastern Star and the Ladies of the Maccabees.

H H HOLLEY

Among the professional men of Tulare county none has occupied a higher place in the esteem of the public than H. H. Holley, who, in his capacity as a consulting civil engineer, has performed very important and appreciated service for the district in which he lives. He was born in Dorset, Vermont, on the 16th day of August, 1879, the son of Hiland and Mary Elizabeth (Sykes) Holley. He is the scion of a sterling old New England family, which was founded in America by John Holley in 1618. Hiland Holley was for many years engaged in the marble business in Vermont, cutting the stone from his own quarry. In 1888 he brought his family to California, locating in Los Angeles, but subsequently moving to Palo Alto, where his death occurred. He was the father of three sons: C. H., of Exeter, California; E. L., of Los Angeles, and H. H., of this review.

H. H. Holley received a good public school education and then entered Stanford University, from which he was graduated with the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Mining Engineering. For a number of years he was employed in northern California and in Mexico, following his profession, and in 1904 he came to Visalia and has since been engaged here as a consulting engineer. From 1908 to 1912 he was in partnership with his brother, C. H. Holley, prior to that time having been in the employ of the Mount Whitney Power Company, now the Southern California Edison Company. Since the dissolution of the partnership he has been alone in the practice of his profession..

Mr. Holley is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Association of Engineers. Locally he is a member of the advisory council of the Sun Maid Raisin Growers Association, is a member of the city library board, member of the Delta Mosquito Abatement District, and of the local council of Boy Scouts. Besides his professional interests he is the owner of forty acres of fruit and vineyard near Ivanhoe.

Mr. Holley was married to Miss Grace H. Bruckman, a native of Utah. After her graduation from Stanford University she was instructor in Stanford University for one year and also did some high school teaching prior to her marriage. To Mr. and Mrs. Holley have been born five children, namely : Marion, who is a senior in the Visalia high school; Sanford, Richard, Patricia and Anne. Mr. Holley's relations with the community in which he lives have been those of a public-spirited man, alive to the best interests of his fellows. Well educated, a close observer of men and events, and a man of decided convictions, he has exerted a large influence in the development of this section and his efforts have been fully appreciated by those familiar with his work.

LEROY McCORMICK

Leroy McCormick, district attorney for Tulare county, California, was born on a ranch near Madrid, Nebraska, December 12, 1891, and is one of three sons born to W. F. and Jessie B. (Fulmer) McCormick. His ancestry on both sides is of old American stock. The mother died in Nebraska and in 1909 the father came to California and located on a ranch near Orosi.

Leroy McCormick attended the public schools and the high school of Valley, Nebraska, from which latter he was graduated in 1909. He also attended school after coming to California and in 1913 received the degree of LL. B. from the University of Nebraska. He was then admitted to the bar in Nebraska, but returned to California in 1913 and for the next five years was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Tulare county. In 1918 he was appointed under-sheriff and held that position for two years. He formed a partnership with J. A. Chase in 1921 for the practice of law. In January, 1922, he was appointed deputy to the district attorney and on October 18, 1924, was appointed district attorney to fill the unexpired term of Mr. Fred C. Scott, deceased.

Mr. McCormick is a republican in his political views and takes an active part in his party's affairs. He is a prominent figure in fraternal circles, being a member of the Masonic fraternity, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Sciots, the Odd Fellows Lodge and the Rebekahs. He is an active member of the First Methodist Episcopal church of Visalia. In his various lodges and in the church he is always ready and willing to promote good works. As a citizen he takes a keen interest in the affairs of his city and county. He is fond of athletic sports and finds time from the duties of his office to keep in good physical condition by outdoor exercise.

Mr. McCormick has been twice married. He was married to Miss Gertrude Bertrand of Nebraska, on December 15, 1914. She died on January 13, 1919, leaving one daughter, Verna Fay. On June 17, 1922, Mr. McCormick was married to Miss Lillian McMeekin of Merced, California, a native of Iowa. To this second marriage has been born one son, Wesley Leroy. Mr. McCormick is interested in ranch property near Orosi and has ten acres in raisin grapes.

C J GIDDINGS

A gentleman of pleasing address and quiet appearance, frank and kindly in manner, and popular among the people of his community, characterizes C. J. Giddings, the subject of this brief review. Like many of the enterprising citizens of Tulare county, Mr. Giddings hails from the old Buckeye state, but the major portion of his active life has been spent in the locality of which this history treats, having lived to see and have a part in the wonderful changes that have taken place here. He was born near Cleveland, Ohio, on the 29th day of December, 1843, the son of Sidney and Polly (Sackett) Giddings, who were both born and reared in Ohio. The father of Sidney Giddings came to Ohio from Massachusetts in about 1810, making the trip by ox team and being one of the pioneers of his section of Ohio. Sidney Giddings, who was a farmer by vocation, died when his son, C. J., was but eight years old, and eight years later his widow also passed away. At the age of eleven years C. J. Giddings began working on farms and was bound out for three years. During the second year the man to whom he was bound, sold his farm, thus releasing him, and he then started out on his own account. His great ambition was to secure an education and he worked his way through the common schools, but also fitted himself for office work, which he followed for some time. He had one sister, younger than he, Sophia, who later became the wife of Frank E. Welsh, and he took care of her during the years of their youth. Thus in the stern school of necessity he learned those important lessons which had so great an influence on his later life and he has always had a broad sympathy for others in similar conditions, many less fortunate than he having received help from him when help would be most needed and most appreciated.

In November, 1869, Mr. Giddings came to California, locating in Woodland, where he obtained a position in the county clerk's office as auditor and bookkeeper. He was there four years, proved himself a capable and efficient officer, and during the years of his incumbency he was acting county clerk. In 1873 he came to Tulare county, locating near Hanford, prior to the organization of Kings county, and there bought a ranch. In 1876 he sold that property and came to Visalia, where he has since resided. In 1877 he opened an abstract office, in which he was successful, and in 1880 he accepted a position in the Bank of Visalia, of which he became the cashier. Later he was made vice president and eventually became president of the institution. The bank was changed to the National Bank of Visalia and Mr. Giddings became its vice president, retaining that position until 1912, when he became president, which position he holds at the present time, though in 1921 the bank was sold to the Bank of Italy, but the two former banks are still in process of liquidation. In 1922 Mr. Giddings bought an eighty acre ranch in the Oak Grove school district, which, he has devoted mainly to dairy purposes, maintaining a fine herd of high class Guernsey cattle on it. He also owns an eighty-acre dairy ranch east of Visalia and several beautiful residence properties in Visalia. He is essentially a man among men, commanding respect by innate force as well as superior ability, and as a citizen he easily ranks with the most influential of his compeers in affairs looking toward the betterment of the community.

In 1869 Mr. Giddings was married to Miss Minnie Holcomb of Ohio, who died in 1906. To them was born a daughter: Blanche, who is the widow of J. 0. Hickman, late of Hanford. In 1908 Mr. Giddings was married to Miss Anne Olsen and they have three children: Claude S., Josephine and Clarence J. Mr. Giddings is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, having passed through the chairs in the two first- named organizations.

WILLIAM HERBERT SAVAGE

William Herbert Savage, general accountant and attendance officer for the Lindsay school district, was born in Liverpool, England, February 13, 1864, a son of Charles William and Frances M. (Timms) Savage. The father was an artist and designer of note in Liverpool.

Will H. Savage received an academic education, after which he studied chemistry, science and the arts, but devoted his attention to chemistry in Liverpool until he came to California in January, 1907, hoping that a change of climate would prove beneficial to his health.

Before leavingEngland, Mr. Savage was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Nash, whose people were extensively interested in the furniture business in Liverpool. About eighteen months after he arrived in California he was joined by his wife and two children. Since that time the family has resided in Lindsay. Seeing an opening for a public accountant, Mr. Savage took up that line of work as his principal business. Because of his knowledge of chemistry, he has been called by the county horticultural commissioner to assist in testing fruit, and his work in this line has been highly appreciated, both by the commissioner and the fruit- growers whose products have come under his inspection.

He has been attendance officer of the school district since 1911. In 1918 Dr. Kelley of the University of California appointed Mr. Savage his assistant to examine and test the water of the wells about Lindsay. Here his ability was so quickly demonstrated that Dr. Kelley went back to the university, leaving him to make further examinations and tests and report, a work he efficiently and promptly performed.

Mr. Savage and his family occupy a comfortable home at No. 693 North Elmwood avenue. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and takes an interest in its projects for the general good of Lindsay. Of his three children—Jessie Edith, Kenneth Herbert and George William— the two older ones were born inLiverpool and the youngest in Kaweah, Tulare county. Miss Jessie is rapidly becoming prominent as a soprano soloist.

MRS. ANNIE F PAGE

Wholly devoted to home and domestic duties, doing through all the best years of her life the sacred work that comes within her sphere, there is not much to record concerning the life of the average woman. And yet what station so dignified, what office so holy and ennobling as that of home-making wifehood? Among the leaders of social and religious life in Visalia, none occupies a higher place in the esteem of her associates than does Mrs. Annie F. Page. She was born in West Virginia, the daughter of J. T. and Elizabeth E. (Martin) Singleton. The Singletons were one of the fine old families of Virginia and the family record is traced back to 1609 in Scotland. Mr. Singleton was related on his mother's side to President John Adams. J. T. Singleton was an expert mechanic and followed that vocation many years. He brought his family to California, locating in Visalia, where his death occurred in 1895. He was survived a number of years by his widow, who passed away in 1911. Annie F., of this review, was their only child.

Annie F. Singleton was given the advantage of a good public school education. She then learned the trade of dressmaking, which vocation she was following prior to her marriage to Dr. S. C. Page. Dr. Page was a native of Pennsylvania, who had attended medical colleges in Louisville,Kentucky, and St. Joseph, Missouri. He entered upon the active practice of his profession in Effingham, Kansas, and at Kansas City ,Kansas, where he remained until 1895, when he came to Visalia. Here he rapidly gained a large practice and was one of the leading physicians and surgeons here up to the time of his death, which occurred February 25, 1919. He was personally a very popular man throughout this section of the country and was prominent in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Mrs. Page has taken a very active part in many phases of local life. She is an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which she is first vice president of the Ladies Aid Society; member of the Oxford class in the Sunday school and of the Home Missionary Society; member of the Visalia Welfare Club and the Daughters of Rebekah, being a past noble grand of her lodge. She has traveled extensively through­out the United States, having made a trip through the east in 1920 and in 1924 was in Texas, where she has relatives living. Mrs. Page was the owner of a fine forty-acre fruit ranch, but has sold it. She is a lady of unusual tact and soundness of judgment. These and other commendable attributes, coupled with her gracious personality, render her popular with all classes and she has won and retains a host of warm and loyal friends. Dr. Page is also survived by two children of a former marriage—Mrs. Ida Webb and Presley Page.

HAROLD A COLE

Harold A. Cole, who for years has been recognized as the leading teacher of the practice and theory of music in Tulare county, with studio in Porterville, is a native of the old Pine Tree state but is a resident of California by choice and inclination. He was born in Hallowell, a delightful suburb of the city of Augusta, capital of the state of Maine,December 19, 1876, and was reared there amid a fine social environment. Musically inclined from the days of his boyhood, he pursued preparatory studies in music in Hallowell and in Augusta and became a recognized figure in musical circles in the capital, a church organist and a welcome participant in the best of the local musical performances. He early gave his serious attention to the study of the theory of music and harmony and became a teacher in his home town, later pursuing his studies in the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, and in 1907 was graduated from that institution, and for some time was a resident of that city, serving there as organist in the First Unity church and in the Bethany Baptist church.

Mr. Cole's departure from the east came when he responded to a call to take a position as instructor in the conservatory of music of Millikin University at Decatur, Illinois. There he was thus engaged, teacher of pipe organ and the history and theory of music, at the same time serving as organist in one of that city's leading churches, until the summer of 1912, when during a vacation trip into this section of California he became so deeply and definitely attracted to the situation of things in this wonderful valley that he decided to cast in his lot definitely with the people of California. With that end in view he closed out his eastern connections and opened a music studio in Porterville. From the beginning of his residence here Mr. Cole's impress upon local musical circles and upon the general cultural life of the community has been unmistakable, and it is freely acknowledged that he has been an intelligent and influential factor in the promotion of a better understanding of music here within the general sphere of his activities as a teacher. For some time Mr. Cole also maintained a part time studio in Visalia, and for five years rendered service as organist for the Porterville Congregational church, but of recent years his classes have grown to such proportions that he has been compelled to devote his whole time to his Porterville pupils.

Not only as a music master, a teacher with a rare understanding and a sympathetic appreciation of the needs of his pupils, has Mr. Cole be­come widely recognized throughout this section of California, but as a composer he has attained an even wider recognition, some of his songs and piano compositions having attracted the appreciative attention of music critics generally, and he has a definite place in the musical circles of the coast country. Mr. Cole has an admirably appointed studio at No. 732 East Putnam street and is a helpful participant in the city's general social activities. He is a charter member of the Porterville Rotary Club, is a member of the Masonic order, affiliated with Porterville Lodge No. 303, F. & A. M., and is also a member of Porterville Lodge No. 1342, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

GEORGE S YANT

George S. Yant, a well known and successful building contractor of Exeter and one of the leading operators in his line in Tulare county, is a native of the old Buckeye state but has been a resident of California for more than twenty years and is thus thoroughly familiar with conditions here. Active in the building trades since the days of his boyhood, he has continued along those vocational lines since becoming a resident of this state and has long been regarded as one of the most competent contractors in the building trades hereabout, the character of the structural work that has been done here under his direction being convincing evidence of the efficiency of his methods. Since 1919 he has carried on his operations in Exeter and has had charge of much of the better class of building that has been done there and in that vicinity since then. He was born in the city of Canton, the county seat of Stark county, in the state of Ohio, November 16, 1871, a son of William B. and Sarah (Criswell) Yant, the former of whom, a plasterer by trade, came to California in August, 1899, and settled in Los Angeles.

Reared in Canton, George S. Yant had his schooling there and under his father's direction practically grew up to the building trades, in time becoming thoroughly familiar with all phases of building operations, an expert carpenter and an experienced contractor. He continued working along these lines in Ohio until 1902, three years after his father had come to California, when he also came here and established himself in business in Los Angeles, doing a good business there during the height of the boom which struck in there about that time, and was thus engaged there and in other points in southern California until 1919, when he came to Tulare county and established himself as a building contractor in Exeter, where he since has been located and where he has done very well, having come to be recognized as the leading building contractor in that section of the county.

On March 5, 1895, in Alliance, George S. Yant was united in marriage to Miss Maggie Gibson, who was born in Salem,Ohio, daughter of William W. Gibson. Mr. and Mrs. Yant have two sons : W. E. and J. Russell Yant, the latter of whom was graduated from the Exeter high school in 1925, an honor student and president of the student body during his senior year. W. E. Yant, the elder son and a veteran of the World war with an overseas record, is now in the drug business in Coachella, Riverside county. He was graduated from the University of Southern California with the class of 1916 and during the time of this country's participation in the World war rendered service in the army, a private in Company K of the Eighth Regiment, with the American Expeditionary Forces in France and was overseas for a year or more. He is a Scottish Rite Mason and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. Mrs. Yant is one of the active members of the locally influential Woman's Club of Exeter and has served as vice president of that organization. The Yants have a very pleasant home setting in grounds of two or three acres just on the southern edge of the city and take much pleasure in the orchard and vine­yard they have there developed.

REV HERBERT W TWEEDIE

Rev. Herbert W. Tweedie, pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Visalia, California, is a native of the Hawkeye state, born in Shenandoah, Iowa, December 28, 1890. He came to California when only four years of age, attended the public and high schools of Berkeley, and in 1915 was a member of the graduating class in the University of California. In that institution he studied civil engineering, but after graduating he entered the San Francisco Theological Seminary at San Anselmo, from which he was graduated in 1918. While in college he was active in the work of the Young Men's Christian Association and after receiving his degree from the Theological Seminary entered actively into the work of the ministry.

Mr. Tweedie's first charge was the Union Street Presbyterian church of Oakland,California, where he remained four years. In 1923 he came to Visalia. The First Presbyterian church claims to be the largest religious society in Visalia, the church proper numbering three hundred thirty-seven communicants and the Sunday school shows an average attendance of two hundred fifty. Mr. Tweedie is president of the Visalia Ministerial Association, and is active in Young Men's Christian Association and community service work. He has served as president of the Alumni Association of the Theological Seminary, is now a director in the Boy Scout council and also a director of the Visalia Rotary Club and president of the Visalia Community Service. In politics he is a republican.

In 1914 Mr. Tweedie and Miss Evelyn Edith Slater were united in marriage. Mrs. Tweedie was born in Buffalo,New York, but came to California in early life and is a graduate of the University of California. Mr. and Mrs. Tweedie have four sons: Herbert C., aged nine years; Roy Leonard, aged five ; Jack J., aged three, and Thomas, aged one year.

CYRUS R GURDY

Among the personal factors that in recent years have done much toward promoting the substantial development of the city of Porterville and of this section of California the name of Cyrus R. Gurdy, a well established contractor, widely known as "the cement man" of Porterville, must be given high place, for he has done much in the way of real substantial building hereabout—streets, highways, sidewalks, bridges and buildings throughout Tulare county carrying the unmistakable evidences. of the extent and high character of his operations. For nearly twenty years Mr. Gurdy has been a resident of Porterville. He came here an experienced cement man in 1907 and became the foreman of the operations of one of the leading cement contractors and manufacturers in this. section of the state and was for ten years thus occupied, during that time superintending some of the biggest cement operations carried on hereabout. In 1917 he became engaged in business on his own account. and has since then become widely recognized as a leader in his line, doing a general contracting business and being proprietor of a well equipped establishment at No. 320 Orange street.

Cyrus R. Gurdy was born on a farm in Fayette county, in northeastern Iowa,February 9, 1879, and was there reared. At the age of seventeen he took up the trade of plasterer and thus early became acquainted with that phase of the building trades. It was about that time that cement construction began to attract the favorable attention of builders all over the country and Mr. Gurdy wisely took up that line of constructive work. Iowa towns then also were beginning to replace their old sidewalks with cement and a profitable field thus was opened for the experienced cement man. Presently becoming qualified as a contractor, Mr. Gurdy did considerable business of that character, working in various towns and cities in Iowa, and was thus engaged until 1907, when he came to California and was employed as foreman of the works of N. M. Ball, general cement contractor and manufacturer of cement blocks and pipes in Porterville. As noted above, Mr. Gurdy was for ten years thus employed. In 1917 he opened business for himself and since then has done the major part of the new and reconstruction work in the cement line hereabout. Some of the contracts thus carried out by Mr. Gurdy have been of an unusually heavy character and he has equipment for all sorts of work in his line. He also has facilities for carrying out contracts in steel bridge work. He erected the steel foot bridge across the Tule river south of Porterville, and also has done much in contract painting of bridges; but cement work is his specialty. He has erected numerous new cement bridges for the county, including the hundred-foot bridge across Salt creek and the long span across St. Johns river near Visalia, several of the city bridges in Porterville and miles of sidewalks, curbs and gutters in that city and in Tulare, besides cement flooring in many of the business houses and garages in Porterville, and in the county barn; and he has done much highway work including the cement shoulders on the Lindsay-Tulare highway. Cement building construction hereabout also bears the imprint of his craftsmanship, among works of this latter type being the recent erection of the cement warehouse of the Williamson-Loyd Brothers Company in Porterville.

On October 1, 1910, in Visalia, Mr. Cyrus R. Gurdy was united in marriage to Grace Weger, who also was born in Iowa, and they have a pleasant home in Porterville. Mrs. Gurdy was formerly married to Wm. Bisset, by whom she had one son, Ormond, now twenty-two years of age. Mr. Gurdy is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is also affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

WALTER M GOINS

In all that constitutes true manhood and good citizenship, Walter M. Goins, one of the best known and most substantial of Tulare county ranchers, is a notable example and none stands higher than he in the esteem and confidence of the community honored by his citizenship. Mr. Goins, proprietor of what is known as the D. K. Zumwalt ranch, was born on the 10th day of July, 1888, a son of William and Narcissus (Watkins) Goins, representatives of old southern families. The Goins family came to Tulare county in 1892, and here the father operated a ranch up to the time of his death, which occurred when Walter M., of this review was but a child, and he was then taken into the home of D. K. Zumwalt, who reared him as though he were his own child.

Walter M. Goins secured a good practical education in the common schools, and remained with Mr. Zumwalt, assisting him in the work of the ranch, of which he eventually took complete charge. He has lived on this place continuously from childhood and is now the owner of the place, which comprises three hundred and sixty acres of splendidly improved land. He has been financially successful in his business affairs and now also owns orange groves in Success and 3,500 acres of cattle range in the foothills. He operates on a large scale and his sound judgment and wise discrimination have enabled him to handle his operations profitably. He is a member of the California Cattlemen's Association, a director of the Tulare Cattlemen's Association and a member of the Tulare County Farm Bureau. He has a pleasant and comfortable residence in Visalia and in the public affairs of that community takes a deep interest, giving his support to every movement for the advancement of the general welfare.

Mr. Goins was married to Miss Ruth Eberhart, the daughter of Lewis and Mary (Rosenow) Eberhart. Mr. and Mrs. Goins have one son: Lewis William. Mr. and Mrs. Eberhart were pioneer settlers of Colorado, having gone there in the days of ox-team transportation and they did their part in the development of the section in which they lived. They now reside in Long Beach, California. Mr. Goins has been universally recognized as a splendid citizen, of lofty character, sturdy integrity and unswerving honesty. Always modest and unassuming, and easily approached, he possesses a strong and vigorous personality and in the best sense of the term is a leader of men and well fitted to engage in important enterprises. Because of his earnest life, well-rounded character and large influence, he is eminently entitled to representation in the per­manent records of his county. In politics he is a republican and his religious faith is evidenced by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church.

REVLEE AXTELL WOOD

The Rev. Lee Axtell Wood, pastor of St. John's Episcopal church in Porterville and for years one of the most potent personal factors in the development of the general social and cultural interests of Tulare county, is a native of the old Sunflower state but has been a resident of California since the days of his childhood, and is thus as much a Californian in impulse and interest as though indeed "native and to the manner born". A scholarly product of the educational institutions of California, Mr. Wood is thoroughly conversant with the history and the traditions of this state and his activities in connection with development work here during what properly may be regarded as the modern period of this great central section of central California, the heart of the wondrous valley of the San Joaquin, have written his name high on the roster of those whose interests during the past two or three decades have been so earnestly devoted to that end. Not only in stimulating the spiritual impulses of the people among whom he has so thoughtfully and so effectively labored has he done a good work, but his energies and unselfish efforts have found outlet in other directions and he has long been accounted among the leaders in the general civic life of the community and in social and welfare service, so that he has come to be widely known throughout this whole section of the state.

Lee Axtell Wood was born in the interesting old frontier town of Emporia, Kansas, August 9, 1878, and was eight years of age when, in company with his parents, Lewis C. and Gertrude (Axtell) Wood, he came to California in 1886, the family locating in San Diego. He finished his primary education in the Southwest Institute in that city and then entered Pomona College at Claremont, from which he was graduated in 1900. After two years of postgraduate work at Stanford University he entered the Church Divinity School of the Pacific at San Mateo and in 1906 was graduated from that institution and was admitted to holy orders. Upon his entrance into the ministry of the Episcopal church Mr. Wood was appointed curate of the parish of St. Matthew's in San Mateo. In March, 1908, he was given his first pastoral charge, this being in St. Paul's, Visalia, and it was thus that he became in that year a resident of Tulare county, with the best interests of which county he ever since has been definitely and closely identified.

Pastoral service at St. Paul's in Visalia at that time also included service in St. John's parish at Tulare and Mr. Wood found himself in a wide and interesting field. Field which he gradually and serviceably extended by establishing missions in Porterville and Lindsay. In September, 1911, he was installed as pastor of St. John's parish in Porterville and since has been a resident of that city. During the time he was in charge of St. Paul's at Visalia, Mr. Wood remodeled and enlarged the church edifice and built the parish house. He also directed the erection of St. James church in Lindsay and the attractive St. John's church and parish house in Porterville also were built under his pastoral direction.

During the time of this country's participation in the World war (1917-18) Mr. Wood rendered service as the chairman of the exemption board for district No. 2 in Tulare county and also rendered effective service in the local operations of the American Red Cross, serving for three years as chairman of the local society of that beneficent organization. When it came time to establish a community nurse in connection with the operation of the city schools in Porterville he was one of the prime movers in that direction and also has been for years active in all local relief work movements. In civic affairs Mr. Wood ever has taken a good citizen's interest and long has served as a member of the board of directors of the local public library. As before noted, he has long been an interested and observant student of local history, well informed in matters relating to this section of California, and as a member of the advisory board acting in conjunction with the operations connected with the compilation and publication of this present work, has rendered a service to the editor and compilers of this history that is gratefully acknowledged by the pub­lishers.

On April 22, 1908, in San Mateo, the Rev. Lee A. Wood was united in marriage to Miss Jessie Cuthbert, daughter of J. D. Cuthbert, of San Mateo. Mr. and Mrs. Wood have two children: A daughter, Helen, born in 1916 ; and a son, Lee Axtell Wood, Jr., born in 1925. Mrs. Wood is a native daughter of California, born in Alameda, and by scholastic training is admirably qualified to serve as a devoted helpmate to her husband in the exacting and difficult duties of his ministerial vocation, a gentle and helpful factor in the social and cultural activities to which she has been able to lend herself. Mr. Wood is a Knight Templar Mason, an active member of the influential Rotary Club of Porterville and is a past chaplain of Porterville Lodge No. 1342, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

Rev. Mr. Wood was instrumental, through the Red Cross, in establishing in 1923-24, the children's playground; a dental clinic, through the Tuberculosis Association, in the public schools; was chairman and vice chairman of the Red Cross in 1922-24, and is now one of the directors and chairman of the relief committee.

RICHARD S WYGAL

Among the substantial and energetic citizens of Tulare county who are contributing in definite measure to the prosperity of their respective communities, mention should be made of Richard S. Wygal of Woodlake, where he is engaged in the mercantile business and owns good property. He was born in Butler, Missouri, on the 15th day of February, 1870. His parents were J. P. and Martha (Warren) Wygal, the former of whom is deceased; his widow now lives in Los Angeles, to which city the family moved in 1888. Mr. and Mrs. Wygal were the parents of five children, namely: William, Richard S., the immediate subject of this sketch; Martin O., Edward and Anna.

Richard S. Wygal secured a good education in the public schools and then learned the barber trade, which vocation he followed in Los Angeles until 1897, when he came to Visalia and was similarly employed until 1916, when he came to Woodlake and opened a barber shop on his own account. He gave his attention to that business until about two years ago, when he leased the shop and has since given his attention to his other business interests. He is the owner of a good store, a pool hall, and other local property and also gives considerable attention to building operations and to investments. A keen and sagacious business man, with a high reputation for fair dealing and integrity, he has richly earned the success which is crowning his efforts and is enjoying the respect and good will of the entire community.

Mr. Wygal was married to Miss Jennie Morris, who was born and reared in the same locality in Missouri as himself. They are genial and hospitable and are popular members of the social circles in which they move. Mr. Wygal is a member of the Woodmen of the World.

HARRY E MARTIN

On the roster of that fine group of alert and enterprising husbandmen who in recent years have done so much to promote and develop the great dairy industry in Tulare county, the name of Harry E. Martin, substantial landowner and dairyman, dairy commissioner in and for Tulare county, president of the Tulare County Farm Bureau and for years an active and influential factor in the development of the dairy interests hereabout, ever will hold a place near the top, for he has done well his part in the general stimulation of a phase of farming here that has meant much in the way of increasing the products of this favored region. Though not a native of California, Mr. Martin has been a resident here for about twenty years and during that time has created a definite personal impress upon the fine community with whose interests he identified himself upon coming to this state in 1907.

Harry E. Martin is a native of the old Buckeye state, born in the city of Canton, county seat of Stark county, and a thriving commercial and manufacturing center in northeastern Ohio, October 11, 1875, a son of W. B. and Rella (Wingerter) Martin, members of pioneer families in that state. Reared in Canton, Mr. Martin attended the schools of that city and early became employed in clerical work in connection with mercantile enterprises. As a young man he was attracted to the possibilities attending development in the west and northwest, and went to Montana, in which state he was engaged in commercial work until 1907, when he closed out his interests there and came to California, establishing himself as a farmer and dairyman in Tulare county, where he since has made his home. Mr. Martin has a well improved place in the immediate vicinity of Tulare and has long been well established there as a dairyman, having from the beginning of his operations here given his chief attention to the dairy phase of his farming. Mr. Martin long ago developed on his place a dairy plant that is regarded as one of the best equipped in this section and he thus has long been recognized as one of the leaders in the great dairy industry of this section of the state. In March, 1922, he was appointed dairy commissioner in and for Tulare county and since has occupied that highly responsible position, exerting his best efforts in behalf of the extension of the county's dairy interests. Mr. Martin has for years been an active and efficient factor in the stimulation of a better interest in behalf of the general farm interests of this region, a close student. of farm problems, and when some years ago there came to be a general recognition hereabout of the need of a well organized "get- together" movement on the part of the farmers he became one of the real leaders in that movement. Mr. Martin was elected president of the Tulare County Farm Bureau in 1924, and in that executive capacity he has demonstrated so capably his fitness for the position that he was reelected and has been retained by the bureau as the administrative head of that compact and influential body, one of the best known men in agricultural circles hereabout. Mr. Martin has a forty-acre ranch, largely in alfalfa, and milks twenty-five cows.

On December 30, 1902, in St. Anthony, Idaho, Harry E. Martin was united in marriage to Miss Lydia Mathews, who was born in Salina, Utah, daughter of J. H. Mathews. Mr. and Mrs. Martin have three children: Howard S., Harry E. Martin, Jr., and Helen. The Martins are republicans and take a proper interest in the community's general civic affairs, ever helpful in promoting such movements as have to do with the advancement of the common welfare. Mr. Martin is a member of many years standing of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is also affiliated with the local Fraternal Aid Union.

STACEY E NAYLOR

Stacey E. Naylor, deputy sealer of weights and measures for Tulare county, California, is a native of Michigan, born in the city of Benton Harbor, February 16, 1891. When he was about three years of age his parents removed to Oklahoma. In 1904 they came to California and settled in Dinuba, Tulare county. After graduating from the Dinuba high school, Stacey took the engineering course in the Oakland Polytechnic School and was then engaged in the jewelry business in Dinuba until the United States entered the great World war.

Mr. Naylor then entered the United States navy and was assigned to duty on one of the submarine chasers. While in the service he was stationed for a time at San Pedro, California, then was ordered to the eastern coast and was in New York Harbor until after the signing of the armistice. When he received his honorable discharge he was chief machinist on the United States Supply ship Surprise. He saw no foreign service.

After the war Mr. Naylor was engaged in ranching near Dinuba, but sold out there and embarked in the mercantile business in Badger. Disposing of his interest in Badger, his next business venture was as a ranchman near Cutler until appointed to his present position, in which he has made good and has won the reputation of an efficient and conscientious official.

Mr. Naylor is a member of Alta Post No. 19, American Legion, of Dinuba. The Legion is an organization composed of those who served in the army and navy of the United States in the World war and is devoted to aiding disabled veterans and their families, collecting and preserving historical data relating to the service of the legionaires, and keeping alive the fraternal relations among their comrades in arms. Mrs. Naylor before her marriage was Miss Rowena Fraser, a native of Dinuba, Tulare county. They have two sons: Jack and Paul.

RALPH R WALBRIDGE

Ralph R. Walbridge, district manager of the affairs of the Southern California Edison Company, light and power, with headquarters in Porterville, one of the best known men in Tulare county, is a native son of California and has been a resident of this state all his life, connected with the operations of the Edison company since 1911. He was born in the city of Santa Ana, Orange county, July 30, 1888, and was reared in that city, acquiring his education in the local schools. Upon leaving school he became employed in the offices of the Wells Fargo Express Company in Santa Ana, there gaining a practical experience in bookkeeping and auditing that later was to prove valuable to him, and he continued that employment until 1911, when he transferred his services to the Southern California Edison Company, going on as bookkeeper in the office of that great public service concern in Long Beach. Presently he was sent back to Santa Ana as cashier in the office of the Edison company in that city and in due course was made chief clerk in that office.

In 1917, when the Mount Whitney Power Company's plant and affairs were taken over by the Edison company Mr. Walbridge was sent to Tulare county to install the Edison system of accounting in the books of the power company, preparatory to transferring its affairs to the Edison company. In the next year (1918) he was stationed in the company's general office in Los Angeles, on a special accountancy detail there, and was thus engaged until January 1, 1920, when he was promoted to the position of manager of the affairs of the Edison company in this district, with headquarters in Porterville, and he has since been stationed in this city with offices and headquarters at No. 208 Mill street, not only in direction of this public service concern's affairs throughout this district but actively interested in the general affairs of the community, an earnest advocate of all measures and movements having to do with the promotion of this region's general interests.

On January 14, 1919, in Riverside, Mr. Walbridge was united in marriage to Miss Mira Knupp, who was born in Visalia, the county seat of Tulare county, daughter of the late V. D. Knupp and a member of one of the pioneer families of this section of California. Mr. and Mrs. Walbridge have one child, a daughter, Constance E., born September 27, 1920. Mr. and Mrs. Walbridge are members of the Tulare County Golf and Country Club and take an interested part in the community's general social activities. Mr. Walbridge is a charter member of the locally influential Porterville Rotary Club and was president of that organization during the term 1923-24. He is a member of Porterville Lodge No. 1342, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and takes a proper interest in the affairs of that popular fraternal organization.

HENRY G TRAEGER

For more than forty years Henry G. Traeger, community builder, retired merchant, former town trustee and one of the best known men in this section of California, has been a resident of Porterville and he thus has been a witness to and a participant in the development of that flourishing trade center almost from the time of organized settlement there, for when he arrived in Tulare county the village of Porterville was just getting a fair start in the race toward community development, and it is undoubted that the efforts he presently was able to put forth in development work thereabout had much to do with the general promotion of the commercial and general industrial activities of the place. Now practically retired from the active direction of the interests which long engaged his attention, Mr. Traeger is in a position to enjoy the well earned rewards of his useful endeavors and is thus approaching the calm evening time of his life with the happy consciousness that not all his labor has been lost, for in the upbuilding of the city of Porterville there are many permanent evidences of the part he has taken in that substantial growth. Due to his many years of active participation in local affairs, there are few persons in this valley who are better informed on the history and traditions of the locality than is Mr. Traeger, and his interest in local history is a never waning one. As a member of the advisory board concerned in the compilation of this present History of Tulare County he has rendered a further acceptable service to the community and his kindly and efficient services in that behalf are hereby gratefully acknowledged by the publishers of this work.

Henry G. Traeger is a native of the old Buckeye state but has been a resident of California since the days of his young manhood and his interests therefore for many years have centered in this state. He was born on a farm in the immediate vicinity of the city of Kenton, the county seat of the county of Hardin, in one of the most interesting and picturesque sections of the state of Ohio, April 10, 1859, and remained on the farm until he was sixteen years of age, when, along in the middle '70s, he was caught by the lure of the west and left Ohio, facing toward what seemed to him a fairer and more attractive horizon, and presently found himself in California, a land of promise that during that period was offering much to young men from the east. After some adventuring in various sections of the state Mr. Traeger, in 1884, found himself in the Porterville settlement in Tulare county. There had been a death in the settlement the day before and the first job he struck following his arrival was that of grave-digger, it apparently being thought proper to pass this usually unwelcome task on to the stranger. He then got a job herding hogs in the mountains, another unwelcome task. It was not long until he had enough of that sort of a job to last a lifetime and he took to the woodchoppers camps and was for some time engaged in this strenuous form of exercise, becoming an expert woodsman. He then got a job as a clerk in the general merchandise store of Wilko Mintz in Porterville, and was for fourteen years thereafter connected with that old mercantile establishment, during that time becoming acquainted with practically everyone in the county. Gold questing then attracted him for awhile and for a year he was engaged in mining in the White river district. With the profits derived from this adventure Mr. Treager opened a men's furnishing goods store in Porterville and was for some time thus engaged in business. He also acted for awhile as grain buyer for Eppinger & Company and later became engaged in the furniture business.

As his affairs prospered Mr. Traeger expanded his operations and became a community builder in earnest, one of the monuments to his enterprise being the attractive and substantial commercial block he erected on Main street. He also laid out and put on the market a tract of two and a half acres of town lots known as Traeger's Subdivision to the city of Porterville and in that venture profited fairly well and at the same time afforded an outlet for city expansion that gave to the town one of its most attractive residential districts. For some time also he interested himself in orange growing, and in other ways kept himself busy, for there was no place in his active life for idle moments in those days. He had other mercantile interests in addition to those maintained in Porterville and was for years the president of the company store at Rochdale. Diligent in his own business, Mr. Treager found time to give a good citizen's attention to general civic affairs and for four years served as a member of the board of trustees of the city, during which term of service he helped to put through the paving of Mill, Main and Putnam streets. He also rendered public service for some time as deputy county assessor and in other ways has done what his hand has found to do in the way of promoting the general public interest.

On September 5, 1891, in Porterville, Henry G. Traeger was united in marriage to Mrs. Mary Jane (Schmidt) Myers, who died in 1915. To that union were born two sons: Henry A. and Wilko J. Traeger, both of whom now are living in Fresno. By her former marriage the late Mrs. Traeger was the mother of two daughters, Mrs. Will Hall and Mrs. Minnie Leyva, who are now living inLos Angeles. Mr. Traeger is a Royal Arch Mason and has for years taken an earnest interest in local Masonic affairs. In politics he is a republican. He is one of the veteran members of the Tule River Fishing and Hunting Club, an organization of local sportsmen which in 1891 built a club house on Tule river, and in his later years he has found his chief diversion in the activities of that club, one of the most experienced and ardent disciples of Izaak Walton hereabout.

FRED E HUFFAKER

Fred E. Huffaker, dealer in stationery and confectionery at No. 113 West Main street, Visalia, California, is a native of that city, born March 3, 1877, and all his life he has been a resident of Tulare county. His father, Jacob V. Huffaker, was born in the state of Illinois, but while still in his early childhood his parents removed to Texas. In the early '50s, when he was about thirteen years old, the family came to California and settled in Tulare county. Before he reached his majority he "rode the range" as a cowboy. At that time Tulare county was almost uninhabited except by Indians, wild animals were plentiful in the mountains and on the plains, and the site of Visalia was only a part of a vast wilderness.

Jacob V. Huffaker was one of the pioneers of Visalia and established the first livery stable in the town. At first his equipment consisted mainly of buckboards, drawn by Indian ponies. As the population increased and business improved, he introduced better horses and more comfortable vehicles. Later he was superintendent of streets and all his life was an active citizen. He married Palestine Downing, a native of Missouri, who is still living. Their children were: William, who for some time conducted his father's livery stable and is now living in Coalingo; Mrs. Elsie Dollner of Visalia; Fred E., the subject of this sketch; J. E. Huffaker; Arthur, of Richmond, California ; and Harold, at home. These children were all born in Visalia and all are married except Harold. Palestine Downing crossed the plains with her parents when she was only three years of age. They settled in the Squaw valley, in Fresno county, where her father was engaged in farming and served several years as postmaster.

Fred E. Huffaker's first school was the old frame schoolhouse in Visalia, which occupied the site where the Tipton-Lindsay school now stands. He was a member of the graduating class of 1898 in the Visalia high school and was afterward associated with his father in the management of the livery stable. In 1900 he found employment as clerk in a grocery store. In 1904 he started in business with Austin Foucht as a partner, his part of the capital being only fifty dollars. They had a small cigar and candy store, which by industry and close attention to business, they soon placed on a paying basis. Two years later Mr. Huffaker purchased his partner's interest and since then has been the sole owner and proprietor. Under his control, by studying the demands of the trade and adding to his stock from time to time to meet such demands, he has made Huffaker's Stationery Store one of the leading concerns of its kind in Visalia. Mr. Huffaker owns valuable business property in Richmond, California.

Mr. Huffaker's father was a prominent member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, which doubtless influenced him to become a member himself. He also belongs to Visalia Lodge No. 128, F. & A. M. ; Visalia Lodge No. 1298, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks ; the Woodmen of the World, and the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and is a republican in politics.

Mr. Huffaker married Miss Ethel Parr, who was born in Tulare,California, and is a daughter of one of that town's early settlers. To this union has been born one son, Fred E., Jr., now a student in the Visalia high school.

S J BRAINERD

For years S. J. Brainerd, supervising principal of the Tulare high school and a member of the California state council of education, has been identified with educational work in Tulare county and has thus come to be recognized as one of the real vital personal factors in the gratifying development that has taken place in the local school system during the period of his activities in this behalf. Mr. Brainerd has been particularly interested in the promotion of the interests of the central high school with a view to meeting the needs of the adjacent rural communities and has done an excellent work along that line. After some years of valuable practical work in the schools of this county, his experience here having included work in the schools of Tulare and of Exeter, in 1918 he was made principal of the Tulare high school and has since been serving in that responsible capacity, during this time having done much to extend the facilities and the influence of this school. In February, 1923, he was requested to take charge of the city elementary school, and since then has had charge of both. No fewer than twelve teachers have been added to the staff of the Tulare high school during Mr. Brainerd's incumbency as principal and the general facilities of the school have been extended in proportion, a community labor being performed there that places these schools right up near the top of the list of efficient local centers of education in this section of the State. S. J. Brainerd was born on a farm in Saginaw county, in the state of Michigan, July 22, 1880, a son of F. C. and Hannah (Jones) Brainerd, both members of pioneer families in that state. Reared on the home farm, S. J. Brainerd attended the rural schools of that neighborhood and early began teaching, his experience in teaching district schools covering work along that line not only in his native Michigan but in the state of Illinois. Meanwhile he was continuing his studies and in 1909 was graduated from Olivet College at Olivet, Michigan, from which institution he received his A. B. degree. Through postgraduate work in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, he received his Master of Arts degree in 1914. Since coming to California, Mr. Brainerd also has taken postgraduate work in the University of California and is constantly alert to advances being made in educational methods.

It was in 1915 that Mr. Brainerd came to California and never has he had occasion to regret the decision which brought him here. His first work in the educational field here was as a teacher of mathematics in the Tulare high school. He later spent three years in the high school in Exeter and then, in 1918, was appointed by the school board to the exacting and responsible position of supervising principal of the Tulare high schools. As a member of the California state council of education Mr. Brainerd's influence in educational circles has a wider than a merely local application and he has a high standing in professional circles, a standing well earned by years of faithful, practical and effective service.

On August 11, 1915, in South Bend, Indiana, Mr. Brainerd was united in marriage to Miss Hilda Youngquist, daughter of August Youngquist, of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Brainerd have two children: A son, Walton Kirk Brainerd; and a daughter, Mary Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. Brainerd are members of the Congregational church and take a proper interest in church work as well as in the general social and cultural activities of the community, and both have rendered effective service in behalf of the local chapter of the American Red Cross. Mr. Brainerd is a member of the executive committee of the locally influential Tulare Rotary Club and is also one of the active workers in behalf of the extension of the interests of the local branch of the Young Men's Christian Association. As a member of the executive committee of the Tulare Chamber of Commerce he also gives his thoughtful and intelligent attention to all proper movements having to do with the advancement of the city's material interests.

GEORGE HOLADAY

A man who has stamped the impress of his strong individuality upon the people of his community, and who is numbered among the successful ranchers of Tulare county, is George Holaday, who now owns and operates the old Holaday ranch, one mile west of Tulare. He was born in Tulare on January 29, 1881, the son of Miles and Frances (Mann) Holaday, both of whom were born and reared in the state of Iowa. In the early '70s they crossed the plains to California, locating on a ranch near Tulare, where they were successful to an eminent degree and there spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying there in 1319 and the mother in 1923.

George Holaday received a good practical public school education and remained at home assisting his father until he had gained his majority. Thereafter for several years he was employed on the Government Experimental Farm, near Tulare, but aside from that he has applied his energies continuously to ranching. He is the owner of a finely improved place of thirty-two acres, on which he carries on dairy farming and the raising of chickens. His life history has been distinguished by the most substantial qualities of character and, because of his success and his public-spirited interest in everything tending to benefit the community, he enjoys a well deserved popularity among his fellowmen.

Mr. Holaday was married to Miss Irene Carpenter, whose father was a pioneer wagonmaker and blacksmith here. To this union have been born two sons, namely: Kenneth, who is a graduate of the Tulare high school, where he was president of his class and a leader in dramatics and athletics, and is now a student in the law department of the University of Southern California; and LeRoy, who is now a student in the Tulare high school and he, too, is making a fine record. Mr. Holaday is a member of the Woodmen of the World and he and his wife are active members of the Baptist church, he being a member of the finance committee of his church, while Mrs. Holaday is a deaconess.

MISS MARTHA H RADKE

If a thorough preliminary training counts for anything in business, it is no doubt responsible for much of the success of Miss Martha H. Radke, proprietor of a millinery store on West Main street. Visalia, California. As a young girl she was reared and educated in the city of St. Paul, Minnesota. Upon leaving school she entered the wholesale millinery house of Strong & Warren in that city, where she learned the art of trimming hats. Later she was with the wholesale millinery firm of Robinson & Strause, also of St. Paul, where she became recognized as an expert trimmer.

Robinson & Strause sent Miss Radke to various cities as an expert to assist local milliners in building up a trade in St. Paul millinery. She was for some time in La Crosse, Wisconsin, as well as other leading cities in that state: then he went to Montana,  from there to Portland, Oregon; was for some time with Mrs. Abrams in Aberdeen, Washington; and came to California as a trimmer for S. H. Gill in Selma. In 1920 she came to Visalia, and liking the appearance of the city, determined to make it her home.

Relying upon her knowledge of the millinery business and her ability to please the women of Visalia in the matter of headwear, Miss Radke purchased the millinery store operated by Mrs. Bodie. For some time the business was conducted under the name of Radke & Walton, but Miss Radke is now the sole owner. Her trade has grown and she is the proprietor of the only exclusive millinery house in Visalia. She is a member of the First Methodist Episcopal church, owns a comfortable home, which she has built since coming to Visalia, and is regarded as one of the city's progressive business women.

CLARENCE R OGLESBY

Among the "live wires" and town "boosters" of the flourishing city of Porterville there are few who are more actively and effectively "on the job" than is Clarence R. Oglesby, one of the city trustees, who is in the automobile sales business in that city. Though not a native son of California, Mr. Oglesby has lived in this state long enough to become thoroughly imbued with the spirit of this delectable region and he is as enthusiastic a booster for the interests of the state at large as any.

Mr. Oglesby is a native of Kansas, born on a farm in Cloud county, in the north central part of that state, December 12, 1889, and is thus now in the very prime of his vigorous young manhood. When he was but a lad his parents moved from Kansas to a farm in Logan county in central Illinois. He finished his education in the schools of the city of Dixon, in the Rock River valley in that state and when seventeen years of age sought a wider outlet for his energies in the "bounding" west. Going to Montana in 1906, he became employed in the operations of the Continental Oil Company at Great Falls and later was transferred to Butte. After awhile he became engaged in business for himself but in 1915 he closed out his interests in Montana and came to California, where he became connected with the operations of the Union Oil Company inFresno. Presently he again took up business on his own account, becoming the proprietor of a garage in McFarland, Kern county. In 1921 he closed out that business in favor of a new location in Porterville and in that year established himself there in business where he since has been operating a very successful salesroom and general accessory store at No. 516 North Main street. Mr. Oglesby also is the local agent for the sale of the Reo automobile - "speed-wagons" and has built up a thriving business, one of the best known automobile men in this section of the state. Not only has he been active in his own business but in the general affairs of the community he has taken a warm interest and has come to be known as one of the most effective local promoters of the flourishing trade center in which he elected to make his home. In September, 1924, Mr. Oglesby was appointed to fill an unexpired term on the board of city trustees and since then has devoted his earnest attention to municipal affairs. He is a member of the Porterville Rotary Club and in the affairs of that locally influential organization takes an active interest. Mr. Oglesby is Porterville agent for the California Transit Company stage line.

On June 18, 1913, in Helena, Montana, Clarence R. Oglesby was united in marriage to Miss Maude Boyd, who was born in Falls City, Nebraska, a daughter of Hugh Boyd. Mr. and Mrs. Oglesby have three children: two daughters, Margaret Beth and Carolyn Ruth; and a son, Hugh Richard. The Oglesbys have a pleasant home in Porterville and take a proper interest in the city's general social activities.

CHARLES E MACKEY

Charles E. Mackey, a substantial rancher and landowner living in Exeter, former justice of the peace in and for that district, present constable, formerly and for years in the livery business there and one of the best known men in Tulare county, is a Missourian by birth but has been a resident of California since the days of his young manhood. He was born on a farm in Ozark county, Missouri, December 20, 1871, a son of Arch and Penelope (Hawkins) Mackey, both members of old families in the south and the former of whom, a soldier of the Confederacy during the time of the Civil war, died when his son Charles was but an infant.

With the exception of two years spent in the state of Arkansas, Charles E. Mackey had his home in Missouri until he was about eighteen years of age when, in 1889, he came to California and became employed working on ranches out of Visalia. In 1896 he established his home in Exeter and has ever since been a resident of that flourishing little city. Upon locating there he opened a livery stable and was for years in business along that line in Exeter. In 1910 he suffered a serious loss by fire, but rebuilt his stable and continued in business until 1912, when he sold out and has since been giving his attention to the development of his orchards and vine­yards. It was in 1911 that Mr. Mackey bought his first tract of orchard land. Since then he has increased his holdings until now he is the owner of no less than forty acres of vineyard and fruit lands in various localities hereabout, besides a tract in Kern county.

Mr. Mackey is an ardent democrat and has long taken an active and interested part in local civic affairs. His first elective office came to him in 1898, two years after he had taken up his residence in Exeter, when he was elected constable for a term of four years. At the end of that term of service he was elected, in 1902, to the office of justice of the peace and served in that magisterial capacity for four years. In 1910 he again was elected constable and by successive re-elections has been retained in that office, thus now serving his fifth term as a law enforcement officer, this continued service being an evidence of the public's appreciation of the efficacy of the service that is unmistakable. He and his family have a pleasant home in Exeter and are comfortably situated.

On July 6, 1894, in Tulare county, Charles E. Mackey was united in marriage to the widow of W. R. Hawkins who was formerly Miss Lou A. Kay, and they have one child: A son, Aubrey Elmer Mackey, who was graduated from the Exeter high school and is now living in Fresno. Aubrey E. Mackey is a veteran of the World war, having served for two years and five months in the navy, most of this time having been spent in patrol duty on the Atlantic coast. Mrs. Mackey is a native of the state of Georgia but has been a resident of California since the days of her girlhood. For some time prior to her marriage she had been rendering public service as a teacher in the schools of Missouri and continues to maintain an active interest in local school work, a helpful factor in the general cultural activities of her home town, and is a member of the Woman's Club of Exeter, a member of Woman's Woodcraft and of the local Bridge Club and the Thimble Club. Mr. Mackey is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and is also affiliated with the Woodmen of the World. He has served as delegate to state conventions, etc.

JOHN F CLARK

John F. Clark, city assessor, tax collector and collector of license fees in the city of Visalia, California, was born in Frankfort, Maine, May 30, 1868. As a boy he attended the common schools of his native town until he was thirteen years of age. He then started in to learn the trade of granite cutter with his father, though he continued to attend school during the winter months. His desire for a better education led him to save his earnings while working in the granite quarries, and with these earnings he paid his way through the East Maine Conference Seminary, where he was graduated in 1889. At the age of twenty-six years he was elected one of the board of selectmen of his native town.

After completing his education he worked in many of the granite quarries of New England, including the Bodwell Granite Company and the Mount Waldo Granite Company of Maine; the 0. W. Norcross Company of Worcester,Massachusetts; and the Hardwick Granite Company of Hardwick,Vermont, reputed to have the largest granite cutting sheds in the world. In the last named plant he held the position of foreman. Leaving the Hardwick Company, he accepted a position as foreman and draftsman for the W. N. Flint Granite Company, of Mounson, Massachusetts. He remained with this company for fifteen years, during the greater part of which time he traveled over the eastern states making estimates on granite work.

In October, 1917, Mr. Clark arrived in Visalia, purchased five acres of ground on South Conyer street and erected thereon a new residence. For two years he was employed as a cutter by the Visalia Marble & Granite Company. Later he was employed by the county authorities to make plats for the appraisal board from which to appraise the property of the county. He was appointed to the office he now holds under the new city charter, which went into effect in 1921.

Mr. Clark married Miss Ila M. Gray, a native of Bradley, Maine, and they have two sons and a daughter: Henry G., Beulah L., and J. Elden Clark. While in the east Mr. Clark joined the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Improved Order of Red Men. He is a past noble grand of the Odd Fellows' lodge at Monson, Massachusetts, and a past sachem of the Red Men's lodge of Troy, New Hampshire.

RUFUS J BAGBY

Rufus J. Bagby, one of the oldest contractors and builders in Visalia and a citizen who commands the highest respect throughout this community, was born on the 3d day of September, 1860, near Raleigh, North Carolina, the son of J. W. and Jane (Edwards) Bagby, both of whom also were natives of North Carolina. The family is of Scottish origin, Rufus J. Bagby's paternal grandfather, Abner Bagby, having come from Scotland to North Carolina in an early day. J. W. Bagby was drafted by the Confederate army during the Civil war, but his sympathies being with the northern cause, he escaped through the lines and enlisted in the Union army, in which he saw much active service. After the close of that struggle, having lost all his property, he went to Iowa, where he became a minister of the Presbyterian church, and later of the Seventh Day Adventist church, and filled a number of leading pulpits through the middle west. His death occurred in 1882.

Rufus J. Bagby received a good education, having passed through the common schools, the high school and a normal college at Clay Center, Kansas. He then served an apprenticeship to the plastering and brick­laying trades and became a contractor in those lines. He has followed this business intermittently all his life and has handled a number of large and important contracts in Kansas and California. He came to the latter state in 1888, locating first in Fresno, where he followed his trade, and in 1890 came to Visalia, where he has since resided. He has been very active in many ways since locating here and no man in the entire community stands higher in the confidence and esteem of the people generally. In 1901 he was elected a member of the city council, but resigned from that body in order to take charge of the construction of Visalia's first sewer system. It involved the building of nineteen miles of sewers and was a two-year job. He served as foreman on the construction of the city hall, the Catholic church and the Goldstein building, and was city superintendent of the construction of the Mill Creek conduit, which required a year to build. In July, 1913, Mr. Bagby was appointed post­master of Visalia, holding that position until June, 1922, a period of nine years, and giving to both his official superiors and the public, faithful, painstaking and conscientious service. This was a trying period, as during the period of the World war much extra labor fell to the post­master. Since retiring from the postmastership Mr. Bagby has not taken a very active part in business affairs, his health having become somewhat impaired.

Mr. Bagby was married to Miss Elizabeth Hughes, a native of England who came to the United States in girlhood. Mr. and Mrs. Bagby have a son, Earl A., who is a graduate of the law department of Michigan State University and is now chief counsel for the California Transit Company at Oakland. Mrs. Bagby is a lady of many commendable qualities of head and heart and is active in local lodge and social life. In May, 1925, Mr. Bagby was elected to the city council, being one of four candidates for two places, and was elected by one hundred twenty-five majority over the next high man. Mr. Bagby is a democrat in his political affiliation and has served as a delegate to many state and county conventions. He has also served on school and election boards many times, always with entire satisfaction. Fraternally, he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the World and the Loyal Order of Moose.

R B SINGLETARY

Upon the list of fruit handlers of Lindsay, California, the name of R. B. Singletary, foreman and manager of the warehouse and packing plant of the Lindsay Orange Growers Association occupies a prominent place. He was born in Riverside, California, in 1885, a son of John Fred and Elizabeth Pickens (Glover) Singletary. His father came to California from his native state of North Carolina in 1884 and located in Riverside, where for a number of years he worked at the carpenter's trade, and where he is now actively engaged as a cabinetmaker although seventy-six years of age. Elizabeth Glover was born in Alabama and both parents belonged to old southern families.

R. B. Singletary acquired his elementary education in the public schools of Riverside. After that he attended night school for three terms, thereby obtaining a good business education. When only fourteen years old he began work in a packing house and since then has been interested in the fruit shipping industry. In 1905 he came to Lindsay as an employe of the Independent Packing Company, with which concern he continued for ten years as foreman. He was then for four years foreman for the Lindsay District Orange Company. When that company was merged with the Lindsay Orange Growers Association in 1919 Mr. Singletary was made foreman and manager. Thus it will be seen that since 1905 he has been with only two employers. The plant of which he is now manager has a daily capacity of seven cars during the shipping season.

Mr. Singletary occupies a cozy home at No. 386 Samoa street. Mrs. Singletary was formerly Miss May Campbell of Redlands, California. Her father, Richard Campbell, was one of the real pioneers of Redlands, having crossed the plains in 1852. He is still living and is hale and hearty, though he has passed the age of fourscore years. Mr. Singletary belongs to the Woodmen of the World and his wife is one of the active members of the Ladies of the Maccabees. They have two children— Margaret and Thomas.

ORAL I DALEY, M D

Dr. Oral I. Daley, formerly and for many years a practicing physician in Porterville and who of late years has been giving his attention to his extensive live stock interests in Tulare county, one of the best known and most successful breeders of pure bred registered Hereford cattle in this section of the state, is a native son of California and has been a resident of this state all his life, a resident of Porterville, with a brief exception, for nearly a quarter of a century. He was born on a farm in the valley of the Moraga, in Contra Costa county, August 21, 1879, and is a son of James M. and Lizzie (Hunsaker) Daley, the latter of whom, a native of Missouri and a resident of California since the days of her girlhood, is still living on the old home place in the vicinity of the village of Lafayette in Contra Costa county. She came into California in a covered wagon with her parents in the '60s and has many an interesting tale to tell of the days of the pioneers in that section in which her family settled. The late James M. Daley, who was a native of Tennessee, also came into this state by the plains route, in the '60s and was for some time after his arrival here engaged in teaching school. After his marriage he established his home on a farm in Contra Costa county and there developed a good piece of property. Of the nine children born to him and his wife, of whom Dr. Daley is the fifth in order of birth, all are living save one.

Reared on the home farm in the neighborhood of Lafayette, Oral I. Daley had his initial education in the local schools and early became seriously interested in the study of medicine. Under local preceptorship he was prepared for college and then he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons in San Francisco, from which institution he was graduated with the class of 1901, then being in his twenty-second year. In the fall of that same year (1901) Dr. Daley became established in practice in Porterville and continued in practice there for five years, or until 1906, when he moved to Loyalton in Sierra county. In this latter place he practiced until the fall of 1911, when, following his marriage, he returned to Porterville and reestablished himself in that city. In 1915 he retired from practice in order that he might give his undivided attention to the considerable live stock interests he meanwhile had been developing there.

Dr. Daley has a well equipped and well stocked cattle ranch in the mountains east of Porterville and on that place has one of the best herds of registered Herefords in this section of the state. This herd is led by registered sires and the products of the ranch are in wide demand on the part of those seeking pure bred Range stock, some of the cows from the ranch selling for as high as eight hundred and fifty dollars. It is no unusual thing for a young bull from this ranch to fetch as much as five hundred dollars in the market and calves from the ranch sell for one hundred dollars to three hundred dollars. In addition to his live stock interests Dr. Daley also is the holder of other substantial interests, including valuable real estate in Porterville, and in association with his brother is the owner of a business block on Main street. In the spring of 1924 he was elected to represent his ward on the board of city trustees and has since been giving considerable attention to local municipal affairs.

On July 27, 1911, in San Francisco, Dr. Oral I. Daley was united in marriage to Miss Florence Agnes Moran, who was born in San Francisco, a daughter of Harrison Moran. Dr. and Mrs. Daley have three children, sons all : Oral Richard, born in 1915; Vinton Allan, born in 1917; and Donald Leroy, born in 1924. Dr. Daley is a Royal Arch Mason, affiliated with Alamo Lodge No. 122, F. & A. M., in Contra Costa county, and with Chapter No. 31, R. A. M., in Martinez, and both he and Mrs. Daley are members of Palm Leaf Chapter No. 114, Order of the Eastern Star, in Porterville. Though no longer active in practice, the Doctor retains his interest and keeps abreast of the time in medical science. The Daleys have a very pleasant home at No. 547 Murray avenue. They are republicans in politics and are affiliated with the Congregational church.

W E HOLADAY

W. E. Holaday, the well known cattleman, rancher and banker of Tipton, is among the favorably known and representative citizens of Tulare county, having by his indomitable enterprise and progressive methods contributed in a material way to the advancement of the community. He was born in Tulare on the 20th day of March, 1888, the son of Miles and Frances (Mann) Holaday. These parents, who were born, reared and married in Iowa, came to Tulare county in the '70s, settled on land near Tulare and Miles Holaday gained considerable prominence as a successful rancher and public-spirited citizen. The father died in 1919 and his wife passed away in 1923.

W. E. Holaday was reared on his father's farm and secured a good common school and high school education. For awhile after leaving school he clerked in stores inTulare and Taft, then became associated with his father-in-law, W. M. Thomson, and his brother, Carter Holaday, under the firm name of Thomson & Holaday Brothers, in the cattle business. They have been very successful and have handled an enormous number of cattle and hogs. Mr. Holaday also assists in caring for Mr. Thomson's lands, comprising about eight hundred acres of fine land, devoted to cattle raising and farming. Mr. Holaday is the owner of a fine ranch of forty acres and has been very successful in its operation. Mr. Holaday is a member of the board of directors of the Farmers State Bank of Tulare and Tipton and was one of the organizers of the branch bank in Tipton. He has been deeply interested in educational affairs and has rendered efficient service' as a member of the school board.

Mr. Holaday was married to Miss Gladys Thomson, the daughter of W. M. Thomson, who is represented elsewhere in this work, and they are the parents of two children; Billy and Gale. He is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and he and his wife have membership in the Order of the Eastern Star. The qualities which have made Mr. Holaday one of the successful men of his community have also brought him the esteem of his fellowmen, who appreciate his many fine qualities of character.

JOHN T FULLER

John T. Fuller, one of the best known lawyers in Tulare county, for years engaged in practice in Porterville, where he makes his home, and long recognized as one of the most energetic and public-spirited citizens of that flourishing city, is a Tennessean by birth but has been a resident of California since the days of his boyhood, and thus to all practical intents and purposes is as much a Californian as any, for his interests have been centered here since his childhood. He was born, May 28, 1882, and was twelve years of age when in 1894 he came to California with his parents, J. R. and Mary J. (Kile) Fuller, the family locating in Whittier, Los Angeles county.

It was thus that John T. Fuller's initial education was finished in the excellent public schools of the city of Whittier. He went on through the high school and early became seriously interested in the study of law. After a thorough course of preparatory study along that line under local preceptorship, he entered the Law School of the University of Southern California at Los Angeles, and in January, 1909, passed the examination prescribed by the state and was admitted to the bar. For a year there­after Mr. Fuller was engaged in the practice of law at Santa Ana and then, in 1910, he came to Tulare county and entered into practice in Lindsay. Not long afterward he moved to Porterville and has since been practicing in that city, with present offices in the Pacific Southwest Trust & Savings Bank building, at the corner of Main and Putnam streets.

Mr. Fuller is an active member of the Tulare County Bar Association and has a wide and lucrative practice throughout the county. He finds his chief diversion in his fine stable of saddle horses at his mountain ranch home in the immediate vicinity of Porterville and takes much pride in maintaining it up to the highest standards. As one of the active "community builders" Mr. Fuller has long been recognized as a "booster" whose zealous efforts in behalf of his home town have been productive of results. It was he who led in the movement which brought about the organization of the locally influential Porterville Rotary Club in 1921 and he was elected the first president of that alert organization. He also is a charter member and one of the most active spirits in the institution of Porterville Lodge No. 1342, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, organ­ized in 1917, and was elected first exalted ruler of that popular lodge, an honor which by successive re-elections he bore for three terms and in 1920 was elected district deputy grand exalted ruler of the order for the district covering central California. He also is a member of the board of trustees of the Porterville Elks Building Association and has given his earnest attention to the plans being worked out in connection with the erection of the new clubhouse of that lodge in that city.

On April 12, 1906, in Los Angeles, John T. Fuller was united in marriage to Miss Bessie C. Clayton, who was born in Kentucky, a member of one of the old families of the Bluegrass state, and they have two children: A son, Kenneth Fuller, born January 23, 1907; and a daughter, Virginia, born in 1913. As noted above, the Fullers have a pleasant mountain home adjacent to the city of Porterville and have ever taken an interested and helpful part in the general social and cultural activities of the community.

MANUEL V CASTELLO

In the successful business career of Manuel V. Castello may be seen an illustration of what can be accomplished by industry, where labor is accompanied by intelligence and good judgment. He was born on one of the Azores Islands, April 25, 1885. In 1901, when only sixteen years of age, he came to the United States and joined his brother, Joseph Castello, at San Rafael, California. There he found employment in a dairy, where he worked long enough to learn how the business should be conducted. He and his brother then established themselves in the dairy business at Crow's Landing, where they succeeded in building up a good trade.

Disposing of his interest in the dairy at Crow's Landing, Manuel V. Castello came to Tulare county and leased one hundred and sixty acres of what is known as the Higby ranch, four miles south of Visalia. His capital was somewhat limited, but with a courage worthy of emulation, he bought a few cows and started a dairy. A little later he sold his stock here and with his brother as a partner purchased one hundred and twenty- five acres from the Melaskine Orchard Company, four miles east of Visalia. Here the Castello brothers again engaged in dairying and now have a herd of thirty high-grade milch cows. In addition to their dairy interests they have a prune orchard of twenty acres, and in 1924, harvested thirty acres of alfalfa. Manuel V. Castello's name was third on the list of signers for the organization of the Dairymen's Cooperative Creamery of Tulare county, of which he is now one of the directors.

Castello's Cash Grocery, of which Manuel V. Castello is the proprietor, was established in 1911 at No. 115 North Church street, where he is still in business and has built up a large patronage, owing mainly to the quality of his goods, his reasonable prices and the uniform courtesy accorded his customers. In recent years he has turned his attention to sheep-raising and has an interest in a flock of fine sheep, which is gradually increasing in numbers.

Mr. Castello is a member of the Visalia Chamber of Commerce. He is a past president of the Portuguese Society, I. D. E. S. of Tulare county, and is also a past president of the Portuguese Society, U. P. E. C. In the latter society he is now secretary of the local organization and grand marshal of the grand lodge of California, which places him in line for the office of grand president in two years. Mr. Castello is married and has one son : Elmo Castello, aged five years.

AMOS T BOONE

In a list of Tulare county boosters the name of Amos T. Boone would stand near the head. And what is better, he believes that actions speak louder than words; that deeds are more important than mere talk. He was born in Kansas City, Missouri, September 18, 1883, and after attending the public schools he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked for several years. He made his first visit to California in 1900 and worked on the Times building in Los Angeles. The following year he went to Trinidad, Colorado, where he was employed in building operations until 1922.

In 1922 Mr. Boone came to Visalia, California, where he began the manufacture of cottage and pimento cheese for the Castle Products Company of Los Angeles. The officers of this company are: W. J. Llewellyn, president; Amos T. Boone, vice president; J. H. Hamilton, secretary. The Visalia plant utilizes the skimmed milk from the Dairymen's Cooper­ative Creamery and manufactures from six thousand five hundred to seven thousand pounds of cheese daily. Prior to the establishment of this business the skimmed milk was regarded as so much waste by the creamery people.

This is just an example of Mr. Boone's idea of doing good for a community—taking a waste product and turning it into an article of commercial value. The cheese made by the Castle Products Company is sold at wholesale only and since the business was established by Mr. Boone it is safe to say that no industry in Visalia has done more to advertise the city as an important business center.

Mr. Boone married Jennie Strickland, a native of Missouri, and they have three children: Erwin D., Helen A. and Roland A. Mr. Boone is a republican in politics and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church.

CHARLES A LINDLEY

Charles A. Lindley, horticultural inspector for the Visalia district of Tulare county, California, was born in Purcell, Oklahoma,May 1, 1891. His father, L. M. Lindley, had come to Oklahoma from Texas some years before and homesteaded a tract of land near Purcell. In 1906 he disposed of this land and removed with his family to Selma, Fresno county, California, where he engaged in farming. He is now a grape grower in the Porterville district of Tulare county.

Charles A. Lindley was educated in the public schools of his native town. Upon coming to California in 1906 he found employment as an orange grader in the fruit-packing houses of Orange county, where he remained for about five years. When the United States entered the great World War, in the spring of 1917, he was mustered into the military service as a corporal in the Three Hundred and Sixty-fourth Infantry, which regiment formed a part of the Ninety-first (Wild West) Division. Corporal Lindley accompanied his command to France and took part in all the battles in which the "Fighting Ninety-first" was engaged.

At the close of the war he received an honorable discharge, returned to his home in California and was for a time associated with his father on the latter's ranch near Porterville. On January 1, 1920, he was appointed to his present position of horticultural inspector. His work as inspector has been characterized by an ability and alertness rarely excelled in a public official. As an example of these qualities, in November, 1924, a box containing fifty-eight specimens of the products of a large plantation in Alabama was sent by mail to a friend in Visalia. There was nothing in the appearance of the box to indicate its contents and the Visalian to whom it was addressed knew nothing about it until notified by the postoffice authorities. A clerk in the post office also notified Mr. Lindley, who was present when the box was delivered to the consignee and insisted upon an examination. Among the articles were some half a dozen noxious weeds unknown in California and a stalk of cotton on which most of the bolls had been eaten away by live boll weevils, five of which were found still alive and active. Mr. Lindley recalled that in 1887 only a few boll weevils found their way into Texas, yet these few multiplied and spread over the entire south, almost ruining the cotton industry in those states. The same thing would doubtless have occurred to the cotton growers of California had it not been for the promptness of Mr. Lindley in ordering the destruction of the pests, as well as of the noxious weeds.

Mr. Lindley's action in this matter unquestionably saved the planters of the San Joaquin valley millions of dollars, for if those weevils had been turned loose it could have been only a question of a few years until the California cotton growers would have suffered the fate of their southern brethren. And just how much benefit he conferred upon the ranchmen of the valley by ordering the destruction of the noxious weeds can only be conjectured. Mr. Lindley and the post office clerk were highly commended by the horticultural commissioner and by the newspapers of Visalia. Such an official is worth to the community many times the amount paid him in salary.

Mr. Lindley married Miss Jessie B. Fruend, a native of Kansas, and resides in Visalia, at No. 1002 West Kaweah street. Mr. Lindley is a member of Visalia Post No. 18 of the American Legion, in which he assists in keeping alive the recollections of his military service overseas and enjoys meeting with his former comrades in arms.

JAMES L VENN

Among the wide awake and progressive business men of the city of Porterville the name of James L. Venn, manager of the Porterville branch plant of the W. R. Spalding Lumber Company and one of the most experienced lumbermen in this section of the state, has come to occupy an important position, for during the nearly twenty years of his residence in that city he has created a very definite place for himself in the general commercial and industrial life of the community, one of the helpful men of affairs who has done so much to advance the material interests of this community during the past two decades. Mr. Venn is a Kentuckian by birth and rearing and had his initial business training in the city of Cincinnati but has been a resident of California and of Porterville since the days of his young manhood and has thus been a helpful factor in development work here during what might properly be regarded as the "modern" period of this wondrous development.

James L. Venn was born May 19, 1884, in Ludlow, a pleasant suburb of the city of Covington, Kenton county, Kentucky, across the river from Cincinnati, where he was reared and received his education, going on through the high school. When sixteen years of age he began work on his first formal "job", that of a presser in a Cincinnati hat factory, and not long afterward became a clerk in the Cincinnati office of the Washburn-Crosby Company, manufacturers and distributors of flour, and there remained until 1907, when at the age of twenty-three he came to California and became a resident of Porterville. Upon his arrival in Porterville, Mr. Venn became connected with the operations of the Porterville Lumber Company, founded and at that time operated by H. F. Brey, and for something more than ten years was thus connected, during that time becoming thoroughly familiar with the details of the lumber business as related to the fine trade area centering in Porterville. In 1918 he became the assistant manager of the Citrus City Lumber Company of Porterville, now carrying on its operations as the W. R. Spalding Lumber Company, and in September, 1924, was promoted to the responsible position of manager of the Porterville branch of that company's extensive holdings in the lumber trade. It thus will be observed that by years of experience Mr. Venn is a thoroughly qualified lumberman and since assuming the duties of manager of the business of the Spalding company in Porterville has done much to advance the local interests of that concern.

On May 4, 1911, in Porterville, James L. Venn was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Rheinbold, who was born in Reese, Michigan, and he and his wife have a pleasant home in Porterville. In addition to his lumber interests Mr. Venn gives a good citizen's attention to general civic affairs and is known as one of the most effective of the progressive town "boosters" of Porterville. He is the secretary of the Arboleda Company and is also secretary of the Home of Peace Cemetery Company. He is an active member of the locally influential Lions Club of Porterville and is a member of the Masonic order, affiliated with Unity Lodge, F. & A. M., of Ludlow,Kentucky, his old home town. He is also a member of Porterville Lodge No. 1342, B. P. 0. E.

SCHUYLER A BARBER, M D

Dr. Schuyler A. Barber, for more than twenty-five years a medical practitioner in Porterville and one of the best known physicians in this section of California, is a Hoosier by birth, a fact of which he never has ceased to be proud, but is a resident of California by choice and inclination, having made his home in this state since the year in which he attained his majority, and is thus in all but birth and rearing as much a Californian as any, for his interests have been centered here ever since he began to assume mature responsibilities. He was born in the pleasant village of Wolcottville, Lagrange county, northeastern Indiana, September 20, 1870, and has been a resident of California since 1890, his first activities in this state having been carried on in connection with the nursery business in Porterville.

Reared in his native town of Wolcottville, Schuyler A. Barber finished the work in the high school there and supplemented this by attendance for one year at that admirable state institution of learning, Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana. In the meantime his elder brother, Clayton Barber, had become a resident of California and engaged in the nursery business in Porterville, back in the days when that now flourishing trade center was struggling for a proper "place in the sun", for it will be recalled that in the late '80s and early '90s Porterville yet had a long way to go before attaining its present distinctive place among the municipalities of this section of California. In 1890, the year in which he came into his majority, Schuyler A. Barber left his old home in Indiana and rejoined his brother here in California, taking part in the latter's nursery operations at Porterville. From the days of his boyhood he had been giving his attention seriously to the study of medicine and after his arrival here he continued these studies privately, with the expectation presently of being able to carry on his studies formally in college. Conserving the money earned at the nursery business, in 1896 he was matriculated by the medical college of Stanford University and in 1899 was graduated from that institution with the degree of M. D.

Upon receiving his diploma Dr. Barber returned to Porterville and established himself in practice in that city, where he ever since has been located, with present offices in the Pacific-Southwest Bank building, and has done very well, for years having been recognized as one of the leaders in his profession hereabout. The Doctor is a member of the Tulare County Medical Society, of the California State Medical Associa ion and of the American Medical Association and has long taken an earnest interest in the deliberations of these bodies. Though a busy professional man, he has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs and for six years rendered public service as a member of the common council of the city of Porterville. He also served for some time as local health officer and in that capacity did much to establish adequate hygienic and sanitary standards for the community. The Doctor also has substantial interests of one sort and another and was for some years a member of the directorate of the Pioneer Bank of Porterville. He formerly owned and operated a fine orange grove but some time ago disposed of it. He also has been more or less interested in local real estate development projects and at one time and another has built and sold no fewer than a half dozen dwelling-houses in the city. He is a member of Porterville Lodge No. 1342, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and has long taken an active interest in the affairs of that popular fraternal organization.

On March 21, 1901, in San Francisco, Dr. Barber was united in marriage to Miss Edith F. Henry, also a native of Indiana, born in Wolcottville. They have a son: Philip S. Barber, who is now (1925) a student at the University of California. Young Mr. Barber is one of the "star" athletes of the university, the captain of the track team, and has a record of :09.9 for the hundred-yard dash, 21 4/10 for 220 yards, which is just a shade under the present established record for that event.

MARCUS CICERO ZUMWALT

In the largest and best sense of the term, Marcus Cicero Zumwalt has been for many years a leader in his community and as such his life record is entitled to a conspicuous place in the history of Tulare county. As an associate of L. E. Schoenemann since 1886, he enjoys the distinction of belonging to the oldest business partnership in his county. Mr. Zumwalt is a native of California, born in Red Bluff, the son of J. B. and Lydia A. (DeWitt) Zumwalt. He is the scion of a long line of sterling ancestors, his family having been established in America in 1728 by Jacob Zumwalt, who located in York, Pennsylvania. Adam Zumwalt was a soldier for the colonies in the War of the Revolution, serving five years, was with Daniel Boone in Kentucky in 1796-97 and later was one of the founders of the city of St. Charles, Missouri. J. B. Zumwalt was orphaned at an early age and in 1849 he left St. Charles and crossed the plains by ox team to California. He first engaged in mining in Hangtown (now Placerville) , later engaged in farming in Red Bluff and in 1878 located in Tulare county, where he bought a tract of railroad land. He was successful in his business affairs, gained considerable prominence in the community and took part in all enterprises for the advancement of local improvements. He was one of the first to advocate the bringing of water through ditches for irrigation and was the first president of the ditch company organized for that purpose. He died at the age of fifty-nine years. His wife had also been a pioneer of California, having crossed the plains in 1859. They were the parents of eleven children.

Marcus Circero Zumwalt was born in Tehama county, December 18, 1860, was reared on his father's farm and received a good public school education. In 1886 he entered into a partnership with L. E. Schoenemann and engaged in the gents furnishings business, in which he has continued to the present time, a period of almost forty years. During this period he has witnessed and taken an active part in the wonderful transformation which has taken place in this county and has been financially successful to a gratifying degree, being considered one of the substantial business men of Tulare county. A man of great force of character, he has usually been found in the lead when any movement has been set on foot for the betterment of his city or county. He has been, in the strictest sense, the architect of his own fortune, for the success which has come to him has been gained only through his persistent and indefatigable efforts and because of the fact that he has ever been true to the highest ideals and principles in business, civic and social life.

Mr. Zumwalt was married to Miss Louisa A. Hunt of Visalia, who was born in San Jose, California. Mr. and Mrs. Zumwalt have a daughter: Dorothy J., who is now the wife of Lynn H. Thompson of Salt Lake City. Mr. Zumwalt is a republican in politics. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the World and the Rotary Club. He is a charter member of the board of trade of Tulare, of which he was secretary for seventeen years. He is a life member of the executive committee of that body, having been a member since 1892 and now its oldest member in point of years of service. Governor Hiram Johnson appointed him a member of the State Reclamation Commission and he was reappointed to that position by Governor Stephens, serving nine years as a member of the commission.

LILBURN SMITH WINGROVE

Among the successful and substantial citizens of Tulare county, L. .S. Wingrove occupies an enviable position. His career as an enterprising merchant, efficient postmaster and for many years secretary of the California Hot Springs, Incorporated, has brought him prominently to the notice of the public and he enjoys a well merited popularity wherever known. He is a native of West Virginia, born on the 24th day of August, 1866. His parents were 0. P. and Margaret (Scott) Wingrove, the former of whom was of English birth and the latter born in West Virginia and a member of an old southern family. In 1876 the family moved to Kansas, where the father followed farming until 1910, when he went to Hemet, California, and there farmed up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1912. His wife died in 1888.

Lilburn Smith Wingrove was educated in the public schools and remained at home until attaining his majority, when he came to Tulare county. He became assistant railway station agent in Porterville, but was later transferred to Lindsay, where he remained for ten years, serving as railroad and townsite agent. He sold town lots there until 1900, when he came to Hot Springs, where he had bought the California Hot Springs property in 1889. In the year he came here he was appointed postmaster and has held that office continuously since, a period of twenty- five years. Mr. Wingrove promoted in 1906 the California Hot Springs, Incorporated, and the company engaged in the mercantile business, in which it has met with splendid success, due to the fact that the firm carries a large and well selected stock of goods and gives careful and courteous treatment to every customer who enters its store. Mr. Wingrove also owns considerable land here. Recently he laid out fine golf links, which he leases to the California Hot Springs, Incorporated. He is president of the Ducor Telegraph and Telephone Company, which he assisted in organizing in 1911 and of which he has been the official head continuously since. Since 1906 Mr. Wingrove has been secretary of the California Hot Springs, Incorporated, and for years manager.

Mr. Wingrove was married in January, 1924, to Mrs. Cora Savage, a native of Indiana. Mr. Wingrove has a son by a former marriage, Meredith, of San Francisco, who has just graduated from law school. Mr. Wingrove is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, being a charter member of the lodge in Porterville.

UGENE U BLALOCK

Ugene U. Blalock, a veteran of the World war, with an officer's commission and an overseas record; one of the best known of the younger members of the bar of the Tulare county court; a practicing lawyer of Porterville ; and prominently identified with the general social and civic activities of that city and of the county at large, is a native Missourian but has been a resident of California since the days of his boyhood. He was born in the historic old town of Gallatin, Daviess county, Missouri, August 17, 1895, and is a son of the Rev. James M. and Virginia Lee (Board) Blalock, the latter of whom, a native of the state of Missouri, has for many years been in educational work, formerly a superintendent of schools in Missouri and now a teacher in the Olive school district in Tulare county. The Rev. James M. Blalock, a clergyman of the Christian communion, now living retired on his ranch in the vicinity of Porterville, was for years during the time of his residence in Missouri a state evangelist of that church in that state. He later became pastor of a church at Artesia in Eddy county, New Mexico, and in 1909 came with his family to California, entering upon the pastorate of the Christian church in Hanford, Kings county. He later became pastor of the Christian church in Porterville and was in active ministerial labors until his retirement. He and his wife have four sons: the immediate subject of this biographical review, the second in order of birth, having an elder brother, Orville Q. Blalock, now a resident of Los Angeles; and two younger brothers, Forest F. Blalock of San Francisco and Cleo C. Blalock of Porterville. The Rev. James M. Blalock is a member of Porterville Camp No. 9064, Modern Woodmen of America.

Ugene U. Blalock was fourteen years of age when he came with his parents to California in 1909. He received his initial schooling in the schools of Marshall, Missouri, and Loving, New Mexico, and finished in the schools of Hanford and Porterville, California, going on through the high school in the latter city. He early became interested in the study of law and before he had attained his majority, in 1916, was graduated from the University of Southern California at Los Angeles, receiving there his Bachelor degree in Arts. Following this preparatory course he entered the Harvard Law School at Cambridge ,Massachusetts, and was in attendance there when in the next year (1917) this country took a hand in the World war and called on its young men to get ready to go. Leaving his studies at Harvard, Mr. Blalock straightway proffered his services in behalf of the army and entered the First Officers Training Camp at Fort Sheridan, up the lake shore out of Chicago, and after a period of intensive training there was given a commission as a second lieutenant and ordered overseas. Then later he was assigned to service with the Sixth Regiment, United States Marines, with the American Expeditionary, Forces in France. For twenty-seven months he was engaged in military service, twenty months of this period being spent over­seas and much of it in active service on the west front, and during this service he was promoted to the rank of captain. In July, 1918, he was returned to the United States as bayonet instructor, and was in charge of the Eighty-fourth Division of the National army, stationed at Camp Sherman, Ohio, for three months. He also did lecture work for the Red Cross during this time. He was returned to France in September, 1918, though he did not rejoin his division, but was made traveling field inspector out of general headquarters. In April, 1919, he was one of two thousand chosen to go to school for three months in Great Britain, attending Trinity College at Dublin, Ireland.

Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Blalock resumed his law studies and during his second year he also taught school for one year. He entered the Law School of the University of Southern California, and in 1921 was graduated from that institution with the degree of J. D. and was admitted to the bar. He then returned to his home in Porterville and has since been practicing law in that city, with present offices in the Home Bank building, and has done very well. Mr. Blalock is a member of the local post of the American Legion (No. 93) and has from the beginning taken an active and helpful interest in the affairs of that patriotic organization. He also is a Mason, affiliated with Westlake Lodge No. 392, F. and A. M., at Los Angeles, is a member of the fraternal order of the Knights of Pythias and is also a member of Forterville Aerie No. 1351, Fraternal Order of Eagles. Mr. Blalock is a member of the Elks Lodge, No. 1342, and is now serving as esquire therein.

On January 28, 1922, in Hollywood, Ugene U. Blalock was united in marriage to Miss Eleanor Dearholt, who was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, daughter of L. A. Dearholt. Mr. and Mrs. Blalock have one child: A daughter, Gloria Katherine, born in 1924. Mr. and Mrs. Blalock are members of the Porterville Golf and Country Club and take a proper interest in the affairs of that popular social organization as well as in the general social and cultural activities of their home town, being helpful in promoting all good works there.

LEWIS E PHIPPS

For twenty years Lewis E. Phipps, furniture dealer in Exeter and also proprietor of the Racket store in that flourishing little city, has been in the mercantile business in this section of California and there are few men better known in commercial circles hereabout than he, for he now is one of the real veterans in business and the fact that his enterprises have been carried on from time to time in several of the towns and villages of this section of the valley has widened his acquaintance throughout this whole section. He is a native of the state of Illinois and a Texan by rearing but a Californian by choice and inclination and has never had occasion to regret the choice which brought him to this state many years ago. He was the first man from Van Zandt county, Texas, to become located in the valley and his good example has been followed by others from that section of the Lone Star state until now there are hundreds of Van Zandt county people residing here, all grateful for the choice which brought them here. Lewis E. Phipps was born in the city of Jerseyville, county seat of Jersey county, in western Illinois, April 7, 1866, a son of John M. and Catherine (Van Horn) Phipps, the latter of whom was a native of the state of Ohio. John M. Phipps, a veteran of the Civil war, was a Virginian by birth. For some time after his marriage he made his home in Illinois and then, in 1877, moved with his family to Wills Point in Van Zandt county, northeastern Texas, where he established himself on a farm, the only northern man in that section of the state and for years the only republican in Van Zandt county.

Lewis E. Phipps was eleven years of age when in 1877 his parents moved from Illinois into Texas and he thus grew up on the farm in Van Zandt county in this latter state and attended the Wills Point schools, for a long time the only Yankee boy in that school. However, the boys were willing to admit that the war was over and he had no trouble on that score. He remained on the home farm until he had attained his majority and then prospected around quite a bit, during this time, beginning in the late '80s, making several trips into California and other points in the coast country, and it was then that he had his first acquaintance with the wonderful San Joaquin Valley, the impression then created in his mind being a lasting one and such as eventually brought him back here as a permanent resident.

It was in 1905 that Mr. Phipps closed out his interests in Texas and came to Tulare county to make his home. He opened a store in Springville and has ever since been in the mercantile business, during the twenty years he thus has been engaged here having carried on his mercantile enterprises at several points—Springville, Long Beach, Taft and Three Rivers—before becoming established in Exeter. It was in 1910 that Mr. Phipps opened a furniture store in Exeter. In 1913 he sold this store, but a few months later resumed possession and has since been carrying on his business there, proprietor of a well stocked and well appointed furniture store and prepared to meet the needs of the trade along that line in the choice trade area centering in Exeter. In 1922 Mr. Phipps bought the Racket store in Exeter and thus has two mercantile establishments, this latter store being in charge of his wife and one of the daughters of the family. Mr. Phipp's second son is associated with him in the management of the furniture store and the family thus is an important factor in the general commercial life of the community. Mr. Phipps is one of the active members of the Exeter Chamber of Commerce and has long been recognized as one of the leaders in the promotion of such movements as have to do with the advancement of the material interests of that thriving little city. He also is a member of the local Kiwanis Club, whose motto is "We Build", and is likewise affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

In 1892, in Wills Point, Texas, L. E. Phipps was united in marriage to Miss Rosetta Phipps, who was born in Illinois, daughter of Thomas J. Phipps. Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Phipps have five children: Thomas L., who is now a rancher in Three Rivers; Gladys, the wife of Chester Weaver of Exeter; Russell, who is with his father in the furniture business; Myrtle, who is an aid to her mother in the management of the Racket store; and Christie, who is in high school. Thomas L. Phipps is a veteran of the World war with an overseas record. He participated in service with the Signal Corps in France and was also at Coblentz with the Army of Occupation.

EDWIN HAMILTON WADDELL, D D S

Dr. Edwin Hamilton Waddell, one of the leading dentists of Visalia, California, is a native of the state, born in Ione, Amador county, November 23, 1886. His parents, George Edwin and Susan (Vogan) Waddell. were both born in that county, where their families were among the pioneers.

Edwin Hamilton Waddell received his elementary education in the public schools of his native town. After graduating from the high school there he attended the Sacramento high school and then entered the dental department of the University of California, where he was a member of the graduating class of 1908, receiving the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. He began practice in Exeter, Tulare county, but in the summer of 1909 he removed to Visalia, where he has built up a satisfactory patronage. His office and laboratory are equipped with all the modern appliances used in the dental profession and he keeps fully abreast of the new discoveries in dentistry. He is a member of the San Joaquin Valley Dental Association, and belongs to several other organizations. In Masonry he is a member of Visalia Lodge No. 128, is a Knights Templar Mason, and belongs to Islam Temple of the Mystic Shrine of San Francisco. He is also a member of Visalia Lodge No. 546, Loyal Order of Moose, and Visalia Lodge No. 1298, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

On August 25, 1913, Dr. Waddell was married to Miss Mary T. Redmond, a native of California, and they have two sons and a daughter: Thornton Hamilton, Susette Southern and James Redmond. Outside of fraternal circles Dr. Waddell is a charter member of the Visalia Rotary Club and belongs to the Visalia Golf Club.

RICHARD E STARK

An enumeration of the enterprising business men of Tulare county who are active factors in the conservation of the interests of their respective communities should include the name of Richard E. Stark, who, since locating in Strathmore has proven himself a man of strong initiative and executive ability. He was born in Salamanca, New York, on the 14th day of May, 1893, the son of David and Agnes (Morton) Stark, who were of Scottish descent.

Richard E. Stark completed his public school education, including the high school, and then took a full course in a business college. In 1912 he came to Visalia, Tulare county, and was appointed deputy county clerk, which position he held three years, and was then for a similar period assistant cashier of the National Bank of Exeter. In 1918 Mr. Stark came to Strathmore and during the subsequent years he has been active in perfecting organizations for the protection and development of local business interests. He first organized the Strathmore Cooperative Citrus Association, followed by the Fruit Growers Association of Strathmore, the Zante Citrus Association, the Strathmore Green Fruit Association and the Elderwood Citrus Association. He is now manager of all these associations except the last named. Original in his ideas and ingenious in their development, he has evolved and demonstrated satisfactorily a number of new ideas for packing-houses in the way of handling fruit, a3rd h%` efforts along these lines have not failed to gain the appreciation of the fruit-growers of this locality. He is the owner of a fine fruit ranch and has been successful in his operations.

Mr. Stark is a Mason, belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Sciots and the Strathmore Chamber of Commerce.

On September 18, 1920, Mr. Stark was married to Miss Clara Mallock of Visalia, and they are the parents of one son: Richard E., Jr. Mrs. Stark is a member of the Strathmore Social Club. Personally Mr. Stark is a man of fine qualities of character and his success and genial and accommodating manner have won for him a large and loyal following throughout this locality.

ELAMI FEEMSTER

For the past twenty-one years the name of Elam I. Feemster, more familiarly known as E. I. Feemster, has been closely interwoven with the legal affairs of the city of Visalia and Tulare county, California. Born in Columbus, Mississippi, February 14, 1873, he was taken to Kansas at an early age and his elementary education was acquired in the public schools of that state. At the age of sixteen years he entered the Kansas State Normal School at Emporia and graduated from that institution with the class four years later. He then spent two years in the Kansas Normal College at Fort Scott, from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Science. In 1902 he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws from the law department of the University of Missouri, at Columbia, and the same year was admitted to the bar in that state.

In 1903 Mr. Feemster came to California and located in Visalia. His first practice in Visalia was in connection with the district attorney's office, which he entered for the purpose of familiarizing himself with practice under the California law, Daniel McFadzean being then the district attorney for Tulare county. From 1906 to 1910 he was associated with Elwood O. Larkins, under the firm name of Larkins & Feemster. Later he was a partner of W. W. Middlecoff and in 1922 the firm of Feemster & Cleary was formed, with Leslie A. Cleary as the junior member. In 1918 Mr. Feemster was made city attorney, which position he still holds, and in the fall of 1924 his partner was appointed deputy district attorney for Tulare county, but neither of these appointments has interfered with their partnership.

Since he became a resident of Visalia, more than twenty years ago, Mr. Feemster has taken a lively interest in every movement for the advancement of the general welfare of the community. His most important work in this direction was no doubt when, as a member of the Board of Freeholders, he drew a new charter for the city and presented it to the legislature, where it was adopted without alteration, except a few minor changes which he made himself. This charter became the organic law of the city in 1922. For several years Mr. Feemster was secretary of the Tulare County Bar Association, in which he now holds the office of president. He has encouraged the lawyers of the county to become members of the association and in numerous instances has aided young attorneys in various ways to become established in practice. 

Mr. Feemster is likewise deeply interested in agricultural matters, to which he has in recent years devoted a portion of his time. In 1917 he purchased a tract of wild land northeast of Visalia, in the Ivanhoe district, and under his direction this land has been brought to a fine state of cultivation. Here he has twenty acres of navel oranges, thirty acres of grapes, ten acres of figs, and seven acres of shipping plums. His interest in this orchard induced him to become a member of the Klink Citrus Association, an organization formed for cooperative marketing purposes. His knowledge of the law has been of great benefit to this association, in enabling it to adopt measures for marketing the product of the district and still keep within the law.

Mr. Feemster drew the charter and wrote the by-laws of the Farm Bureau Marketing Association, by means of which the swine breeders of the county, through cooperative methods, have been able to obtain a better price for their hogs. In this case, as in that of the Citrus Association, his thoughts were more upon the benefits to be derived than upon the fees he would receive for his legal services.

On October 28, 1908, Mr. Feemster was married to Miss Laura Josephine Holder, a descendant of one of Tulare county's pioneer families. Her father was for many years connected with the various county offices.

In politics Mr. Feemster is a democrat. In fraternal circles he is a familiar figure. He is a member of Visalia Lodge No. 128, F. & A. M. : Visalia Lodge No. 1298, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks ; and of the Order of Sciots. He also belongs to the Visalia Kiwanis Club.

FRANK L HAMMER

In the category of useful citizens the contractor and builder should rightfully occupy a place near the head of the list. The architect may draw beautiful designs on paper, but such designs are worthless until the skilled builder gives them a permanence in brick or stone. The structures erected by the successful contractor and builder will remain as a monument to his skill long after he has passed away.

Frank L. Hammer, one of the most prominent contractors and builders of Lindsay, California, was born on a farm in central Missouri, September 12, 1885, a son of Simon and Mary (White) Hammer. He grew to manhood on his father's farm, received a good public school education, and in 1904 paid his first visit to southern California, where he began learning the carpenter's trade. After a few months he returned to Missouri and worked at his trade there until 1906, when he again came to California. This time he worked at carpenter work in the northern part of the state for awhile, when he once more went back to Missouri.

On June 8, 1908, in Lebanon, Mr. Hammer was married to Miss Lessie Garman of Lebanon, Missouri, and soon after his marriage took up his residence in Lindsay, California. He worked at his trade until 1914, when he began contracting on a small scale. As his reputation became known he was called upon to assume the construction of larger buildings, until now he is considered by many as the leading contractor of the city. Among the structures erected by him may be mentioned the No. 2 packing plant of the Lindsay Cooperative Citrus Association; the buildings of the Lindsay Ripe Olive Company, the largest concern of its kind in the world; the addition to the Lindsay high school building; the E. M. M. Service building; and a number of the city's finest residences. Mr. Hammer is a Master Mason in good standing and takes an interest in the good work of that time-honored fraternity. He and his wife have four children: Veda, Melva, Wilma and Frank Leslie, Jr.

GEORGE A H FARMER

In the line of general realty development and fruit culture in this section of California few men have exerted a more potent personal influence than George A. H. Farmer, a substantial realtor and widely known promoter of Porterville, whose operations have made him one of the best known men in the line of general development work in this state. Beginning his operations in this behalf in Porterville about fifteen years ago, Mr. Farmer has extended these operations until now he is recognized as a leader in his line, the owner of large tracts of land awaiting development, owner of large and flourishing orchard tracts, proprietor of two extensive packing plants and a nursery that is doing much to secure the propagation of standard varieties of the best of the horticultural products of this favored valley, and is otherwise actively identified with the general commercial and industrial interests of the community, a past secretary of the Porterville Chamber of Commerce, a director of the Tulare County Fruit Exchange and a continual and consistent "booster" of the interests of this region. A native of England, Mr. Farmer has been an enthusiast in getting back to his native country the good word concerning the wonderful possibilities of this region and through his efforts in that behalf has been instrumental in adding no fewer than two hundred English people to the population of the Porterville district since he became a resident thereof. During this time he also has secured outside investments in this district to the amount of a million dollars or more and thus very properly may be regarded as one of the real promoters of the development of the region in which as a young man seeking a desirable place of location he elected to take his stand.

George A. H. Farmer, as noted above, is a native of England, born in London, September 27, 1889, and is thus now in the very prime of his vigorous and useful manhood. He was reared amid a fine social environment in his native land and was well schooled there, remaining in England until after he had attained his majority when, in 1911, he came to California and in Porterville became connected with the operations of the Porterville Citrus Association, of which J. A. Milligan then was the directing head. He was quick to discern the possibilities of development work hereabout and not long after taking up his residence here began operations on his own account as a realtor and promoter. One of Mr. Farmer's first operations along this line was the purchase of a tract of one thousand acres of undeveloped land in the Terra Bella district, to which he gave the name of Fairfield Farms in honor of his home place in England, planted the same to Emperor grapes, oranges and plums and after the initial development had been made put it on the market in ten-acre tracts. It now is generally recognized hereabout that Fairfield Farms is one of the best kept ranches in the valley, its garden-like reaches attracting the attention of all who pass that way. Almost nine hundred acres of this tract are now in bearing grapes and plums and some five hundred acres of the tract have been disposed of to investors who have taken it up in ten-acres tracts. Many of these are settlers but there are others of these investors who are non-residents and their interests are looked after by Mr. Farmer's representatives on the ground. According to season Mr. Farmer has in his employ from forty to one hundred and fifty persons and his operations have come to assume extensive proportions.

Mr. Farmer's operations include his direction of the affairs of the big packing plant he has set up in Strathmore and which he operates under the name of the Strathmore Orange Groves Company, forty or fifty of the growers of the district pooling their products there for shipment. Mr. Farmer personally owns a tract of four hundred acres which he devotes to the growing of oranges, grapes and plums, besides which he has a tract of almost six hundred acres of land in the vicinity of Visalia awaiting development along the same lines, and a tract of six hundred and forty acres in Riverside county, in the southern part of the state. The widely known Farmer nursery, which he has brought to a fine point of development, is a separate department of his business and in addition to supplies in general horticultural products there he also carries a line of farmers' supplies, sprayers, pumps and the like. His general realty business also is a separate department and in his offices in the Baker block in Porterville he carries on an extensive business in general farm and city real estate, one of the best known dealers in that line hereabouts. As a director of the Tulare County Fruit Exchange, affiliated with the California Fruit Growers Exchange, Mr. Farmer has been able to do much toward the general stabilization of the fruit market in this section and is regarded as a valued factor in that behalf. His first grade grapes are marketed under the well known "Fairfield" brand and others under his "0. K." brand, while his oranges are packed and shipped in two grades, his fancy "Lady Strathmore" brand (Sunkist) and his choice "Tam O'Shanter."

On April 9, 1913, in Porterville, George A. H. Farmer was united in marriage to Miss Louise Templeton, daughter of Mrs. Martha A. Templeton and a member of one of the pioneer families of Tulare county. Mr. and Mrs. Farmer have three children: Edith, Sardis and Patricia. Mr. and Mrs. Farmer are members of the Tulare County Golf and Country Club and the former is a member of the Porterville Gun Club, which maintains a hunting lodge at Wasco in the neighboring county of Kern. Mr. Farmer has long been an active member of the Porterville Chamber of Commerce, one of the foremost promoters of the activities of that useful and influential commercial body and during 1912-13 was secretary of the organization.

LOUIS EMIL SCHOENEMANN

In nearly every community have lived individuals who by innate ability and sheer force of character have attained success and won for themselves conspicuous places in public esteem. Such a man is Louis Emil Schoenemann, who for nearly forty years has been numbered among the leading business men of Tulare. He was born on the 6th day of March, 1855, in Stockton, California, the son of Dr. C. W. and Sarah (Williams) Schoenemann. These parents were married in Illinois and in 1851 started on their wedding trip, making the long and tiresome journey by ox team to California. They located in Stockton, where Dr. Schoenemann entered upon the practice of medicine, being the pioneer in his pro­fession in that locality.

L. E. Schoenemann secured a good public school education and was then employed as a clerk in a store in Ione. In 1881 he came to Tulare for the benefit of his health and was so attracted by the locality that he decided to remain. He engaged in ranching until 1884, when he went into business in Tulare, but his store was destroyed by fire two years later. He then formed a partnership with M. C. Zumwalt, under the firm name of Schoenemann & Zumwalt, and engaged in the gents furnishings business at No. 131 East Tulare street, where they have remained in business continuously since. He has not only been successful in commercial affairs, but has taken an active part in every move for the betterment of the community, being recognized as a public-spirited and progressive citizen. He was the first treasurer of the city of Tulare, holding that office for five years. He was a member of the board of trustees for one term and also has been a member of the board of education. For the past thirty years Mr. Schoenemann has been president of the Tulare Oil & Mining Company, with oil lands around McKittrick, Kern county.

Mr. Schoenemann was married to Miss Katherine Delehanty of Petaluma, California, who was born in New York state and brought to California by her parents when four years of age. To Mr. and Mrs. Schoenemann have been born three daughters: Olga, wife of E. C. Pendleton, a civil engineer for the southern California Edison Company; Clara I., at home; and Geneva, who died in 1909. Mr. Schoenemann is a republican. He has for forty-seven years been an active member of the Masons, and also belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the World, of which he was the first presiding officer; and the Tulare Board of Trade. He is an Episcopalian in religious faith.

ROBERT KENDALL

Reared to the hotel business and actively connected with that business since the days of his boyhood, there is perhaps no more experienced nor more widely known hotel man in California than Robert Kendall, the popular proprietor of the Pioneer Hotel in Porterville, more familiarly known among his friends and the traveling public at "Bob" Kendall, who has made of his hotel in Porterville a widely recognized headquarters for commercial travelers and the tourist population in this section of the state. Mr. Kendall's parents were among the pioneer hotel people of the coast country in the old days of the mining excitement and later engaged in the same line in San Francisco, "Bob" Kendall thus just naturally having grown up to the hotel business, familiar with all the details of that exacting line of public service in various places and under varying conditions, so that there is no problem in any phase of the business that is too intricate for his experienced judgment to solve. For more than ten years he has been engaged in the hotel business in Porterville and during that time has done wonders in the way of popularizing that city as a favorite stopping place for tourists and the general traveling public.

Robert Kendall is a native of the Wolverine state but has been a resident of the coast country since the days of his childhood. He was born in the town of Hancock, Houghton county, in the mining country of the peninsular section of Michigan, May 29, 1867, and is a son of Robert and Caroline (Williams) Kendall, natives of England, who had become residents of the copper country in the northwestern section of the peninsula in Michigan and were helpful in development work there. The senior Robert Kendall became connected with the operations of the great Calumet and Hecla copper mines and his wife carried on a boarding house in Calumet for the miners. At the height of the gold mining excitement in California they came to this state with their family and set up a hotel at Jenny Lind, a popular mining camp in Placer county. When the excitement was transferred over into Nevada they went to Virginia City, where Mr. Kendall took part in mining operations and Mrs. Kendall kept a boarding house for the miners. She gradually extended her hospitable operations in Nevada until at one time during the height of the mining operations there she was conducting as many as seven hotels and eating houses in that region. In 1893 the Kendalls returned to California and took over the operation of the Windsor Hotel at the corner of Fifth and Market streets in San Francisco, where they were carrying on in the hotel business at the time of the fire in 1906, a disaster that destroyed their property and put them out of business. This pioneer cou­ple spent their last days in California.

The junior Robert Kendall was but a child when he came to California with his parents and he grew up here and in Nevada in the various hotels operated by his parents, and until the disaster of 1906 put them out of business he was ever actively associated with their operations. He also for twenty years was engaged in the livery business inSan Francisco, as an adjunct to the hotel business, this stable at the corner of Golden Gate and Hyde streets being carried on under the firm name of Holland & Kendall. After the fire the business was resumed in new stables at the corner of Turk and Pierce streets. In 1916 Mr. Kendall closed out his affairs in San Francisco and moved to Porterville, where he took over the operation of the Porterville Hotel. Three years later he bought the Pioneer Hotel and has since been directing the destinies of that popular hostelry, carrying on his operations in accordance with the best standards of procedure in the modern hotel line. Mr. Kendall also was for some time the proprietor of the Kings Hotel in Hanford. He has other substantial interests in Porterville besides his hotel and is the owner of the Thomas business block on East Putnam street.

On May 5, 1900, in San Francisco, Robert Kendall was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Welch, who was born in Saratoga Springs, New York, and they have a daughter, Miss Caroline Robyn Kendall. Mr. Kendall is a Knights Templar Mason and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with Porterville Lodge No. 303, A. F. & A. M., and with Cornmandery No. 1, Knights Templar, and Islam Temple at San Francisco. He also is affiliated with a lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in San Francisco and is a member of Porterville Lodge No. 1342, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

J A ALTHOUSE

Among the leaders in the citrus growing industry in Tulare county stands J. A. Atlhouse, whose industry, enterprise and progressive methods have gained for him a success that has stamped him as a man of unusual ability. He was born in York county, Pennsylvania, on the 14th day of February, 1861, and is the son of Henry and Juliana (Myers) Althouse, both also natives of Pennsylvania and members of prominent old families of that state. Henry Althouse was a minister of the Evangelical church and occupied many pulpits in Pennsylvania and the middle west. Eventually he came to California and made this his permanent home.

J. A. Althouse received a good public school education and remained with his father until his marriage. He then engaged in fruit raising on his own account, owning several citrus ranches in southern California until coming to Tulare county in 1913. He is now the owner of a fine ranch of one hundred and sixty acres, one hundred and forty-five acres of which is in fruit, mostly oranges and lemons, and he is counted one of the most successful fruit raisers inTulare county. This is the fifth citrus fruit farm he has developed in this state and he leaves nothing undone that will contribute to the successful growing and handling of his fruit. There are approximately ninety acres of eleven-year-old fruit trees, orange, lemon and grape-fruit. This grove has been one of the heavy producers each year and is the pride of the county. He is a director in the Tulare Lemon and Grapefruit Association and is also a director in the Sunland Packing House.

Mr. Althouse was married to Miss Bertha Boeck and they are the parents of three children, namely: Edith, the wife of Everett Howell of Porterville; Benjamin, who is his father's assistant on the home ranch, and Henry James, of Porterville, who is also associated with his father on the ranch. The mother of these children passed away on January 7, 1911. Mr. Althouse is an active member and a trustee of the Evangelical church inPorterville. He is a republican in politics and a progressive man He possesses to a marked degree those qualities that attract men and he enjoys a large circle of warm and loyal friends. He is public spirited and supports every enterprise for the advancement of the community welfare.

WARD C ZELLER, M D

Ward C. Zeller, M. D., a specialist in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, of Visalia, California, was born in Darke county, Ohio, March 5, 1874. In his boyhood he attended the schools of Versailles and Bradford,Ohio, and in the state of Kentucky. After graduating from the Christiansburg, Ohio, high school, he enrolled as a student in the Ohio Northern University at Ada. His preliminary medical studies were pursued under the preceptorship of his father, who was a practicing physician, and when twenty-one years of age he received the degree of M. D. from the Ohio Medical University at Columbus. His first practice was at St. Paris, Champaign county, Ohio, but later he was associated with his brother in practice at Union City, Indiana.

Deciding to become an eye, ear, nose and throat specialist, he took a postgraduate course in Chicago, after which he was for some time connected with some of the leading hospitals of New York city. When the United States entered the World war in the spring of 1917 Dr. Zeller entered the United States Medical Corps with the rank of first lieutenant and was stationed at Camp Merritt, New Jersey. After the war he was in charge of a hospital in Minnesota until late in 1919, when he came to California. His first act after coming to California was to do operative work in the clinic at the University of California at San Francisco, and in 1920 he located in Visalia, where he is active in his practice.

On January 30, 1913, Dr. Zeller was married to Miss Edith Overpack, who was born in Portland, Indiana, and they have a daughte : Elizabeth B. Mrs. Zeller is active in the work of the women's clubs of Visalia and participates in many of the local civic affairs. Dr. Zeller is a member of the Tulare County and the California State Medical Associations, and a fellow of the American Medical Association. While in Ohio he was made a life member of the Greenville Lodge, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is also a member of the American Legion, the Forty and Eight, the Visalia Rotary Club and the Visalia Golf Club.

ESCHOL M HAMMOND

In the interesting field of photography in California there are few names better known than that of Eschol M. Hammond, art and commercial photographer in Porterville, whose special works of photography of some of the scenic wonders of this state and particularly of the beautiful valley of the San Joaquin and of the Yosemite valley and of views from the height of Mount Whitney have attracted much attention among connoisseurs of that distinctive form of art. In July, 1915, Mr. Hammond made the ascent of Mount Whitney, carrying the burden of a forty-pound camera outfit, and remained over night in order to secure morning views from the summit of this highest peak, in the United States. From one of the views thus secured he has developed a picture fifteen feet in length of amazing charm and beauty, which displayed on the walls of his studio, has excited the admiration of all who see it. There is another picture thus displayed, a photographic view done in natural colors, of a poppy field in California, that is a veritable gem of art. And then there are many others, views throughout California and as far north as the Oregon line, all forming a collection of such superior quality as to fix itself definitely on the memories of all who examine it.

Eschol M. Hammond was born on a farm in Morris county, Kansas, December 10, 1890, and is a son of James M. and Margaret (Hinton) Hammond, the latter of whom was born in Ohio. James M. Hammond, a native of the state of Tennessee, came with his family from Kansas to California in 1907 and on January 31, 1908, became a resident of Portervine. Conditions, however, at that time did not prove up to his expectations and it was not long until he and his wife returned east. E. M. Hammond was sixteen years of age when he came with his parents to California in 1907 and he found things here so much to his liking that when his parents returned east he decided to stay on and cast in his lot definitely with that of the people of the rapidly progressing little city of Porterville. From the days of his boyhood back on the old home farm in Kansas, Mr. Hammond had been intensely interested in the art and processes of photography and as a lad had bought a camera, paying for it with money earned by raising onions in one of his father's fields. This interest he brought with him to California and upon his arrival in Porterville he just naturally gravitated toward the local photograph gallery, an establishment at that time being carried on by A. R. Moore, veteran photographer, who also was proprietor of a small theater. Mr. Hammond was given a place in the Moore establishment, going to work at five dollars the week, out of which he had to pay for room and board and such other essentials of personal upkeep as might reasonably face a young stranger in the town. Not long after this Mr. Moore turned his little playhouse into a motion picture theater, the first in the town, and it then became a part of Mr. Hammond's job to crank the projection machine of nights in addition to his labors in the photograph gallery during the days, and he thus carried on for four or five years, meanwhile constantly drilling himself in the art and mystery of photography. With a view to acquiring a better technical knowledge of this difficult art, he then returned east and took a thorough course in a special school of photography in McMinnville, Tennessee, returning then to Porterville and resuming his place in the Moore establishment.

On the Fourth of July, 1914, the Moore protograph studio and theater were destroyed by fire and Mr. Moore retired from business. Ten days later, July 15, 1914, Mr. Hammond started in business for himself as a photographer in Porterville and ever since has been thus engaged, a period of more than ten years, during which time he has come to be recognized as one of the leading photographers in this section of the state. Growing business and the need for more extensive quarters have required his removal twice, he thus having had three locations during the ten years and more in which he has been in business. His present location at No. 408 North Main street is admirably adapted to his purposes, he there having a thoroughly well equipped establishment, modern and up-to-date in all its appointments and with all the paraphernalia requisite to the high quality of its products. In addition to the establishment of a successful business in Porterville, Mr. Hammond also has been an interested and helpful promoter of the general commercial and industrial activities of the town and has rendered service as a director of the local Chamber of Commerce. He is the present secretary of the Rotary Club, an organization of the leading men of the town formed for the definite purpose of more harmonious procedure in local promotion activities and based on a general desire for better civic service, and from the beginning of that locally influential organization he has been one of its most active members.

On April 2, 1912, in Porterville, Eschol M. Hammond was united in marriage to Miss Georgia Mae Dudley, who is a native daughter of California, born in Fresno, the daughter of George Dudley. Mr. and Mrs. Hammond have two children: A son, Clyde Hammond, born in 1913; and a daughter, Margaret, born in 1919. The Hammonds have a pleasant home in Porterville and take an interested and helpful part in the city's general social activities. Mr. Hammond is a member of Porterville Lodge No. 93, Knights of Pythias, and of Orange Camp No. 333, Woodmen of the World, and in the affairs of these popular fraternal organizations he takes a proper interest.

WESLEY B HAINES

Wesley B. Haines, widely known in and about Porterville as a "community builder" and realty promoter and the present police judge of the city, is a native of the old Keystone state but has been a resident of the golden west since the days of his young manhood and his interests therefore for many years have been centered here in the coast country, with the general conditions of which he thus has become thoroughly familiar. He was born in the city of Williamsport, the county seat of the county of Lycoming, in central Pennsylvania, June 23, 1863, and was reared and schooled in that city. As a young man he was for some time engaged in farming in Maryland and then, in 1890, came west and engaged in farming and stock raising in Colorado, later locating at Colorado Springs, where he went into the wholesale bakery business.

In 1901 Mr. Haines moved from Colorado Springs to Portland, Oregon, and in the latter city became the proprietor of the Hotel Royal, a popular hostelry which he conducted until 1906, when he transferred his services to the great Charles K. Spaulding Lumber Company and was made head salesman for that concern's branch establishment in Salem, Oregon. In 1913 Mr. Haines left Salem and came to California, being attracted by the development work then going on at Long Beach in Los Angeles county, and in the latter city he set up as a promoter and building contractor, building houses for the realty market which then was on a "boom" there. For six or seven years Mr. Haines was thus engaged in business in Long Beach and then, in 1920, he transferred his activities to Porterville, where he since has made his home and where he has done well in his operations. Upon taking up his residence in Porterville, Mr. Haines bought a twenty-acre tract of choice land on the edge of the city (southwest) and started in on his urban development project. Five acres of this tract he platted in town lots, creating there the popular Haines Subdivision, now one of the choice residential sections of the city, and when the new union high school project came on he sold five acres of his tract as a part of the grounds on which the magnificent new high school building was erected. The remaining ten acres of this tract he retained for his own uses, planting it to Thompson seedless grapes, and now has there a choice vineyard which has reached profitably productive proportions. Mr. Haines is widely recognized here­about as a progressive and public-spirited citizen and he has done much toward the proper development of the interests of the attractive city in which he has elected to make his home. On January 9, 1925, he was appointed judge of the city police court and is now serving in that important magisterial capacity.

On June 27, 1900, in Colorado, Wesley B. Haines was united in marriage to Miss Helen Colvin, who was born in Nebraska, and they have reared a family of eight children. Judge and Mrs. Haines are members of the First Christian church of Porterville and the Judge is a member of the official board of that congregation, as well as one of the leading members of the Loyal Men's Club, an effective organization of men formed for the extension of the services of the church body.

SAMUEL J R GILBERT

Within recent years much has been said and written about "get rich quick" schemes, but the desire to get rich quick is one of the oldest in the make-up of the average human being. When gold was discovered in California in 1849, people from all parts of the country flocked to the Pacific coast, each one hoping to be among those fortunate enough to pluck fortune from the gold mines. Among those who crossed the plains in that year was J. R. Gilbert, who was born in Woodstock, Vermont, in 1806, but who at the time of the gold strike was living in Ohio. He was captain of an emigrant company, drove a mule team and located in Shasta county, California. Three years later he returned to Ohio and brought his wife and son, Samuel J. R., via the Isthmus of Panama. The family settled in Shasta county, where J. R. Gilbert was engaged in merchandising, and in 1868 he left Shasta, going to what was widely known as "Gilbert's Ferry" across the Sacramento river, operating this for ten years.

Samuel J. R. Gilbert, the son of this Shasta county pioneer, was born in 1847 in Akron, Ohio. Although he was only five years old, he crossed the Isthmus of Panama with his parents in 1852, he remembers that the party made the trip across the isthmus riding mules, which were driven by natives. He grew to manhood and attended the schools of the old town of Shasta, where he acquired a good practical education. Until 1878 he lived with his parents, assisting his father upon the farm and in the management of the ferry. He then opened a hardware store in the town of Redding, a short distance southeast of Shasta. When it was proposed to remove the county seat from Shasta to Redding, Mr. Gilbert was one of the most enthusiastic supporters of the proposition. He worked early and late in circulating petitions and visited all parts of the county in his efforts to secure signatures. In the end he saw his hope realized and Redding became the county seat. While in Redding, Mr. Gilbert served on the school board and was for some time the secretary of the electric light plant and waterworks.

After leaving Redding, Mr. Gilbert was in the hardware business in Hanford, Bakersfield and Fresno, successively. In 1895 he went to Porterville as manager of the Delany Hardware Company, remaining with that concern for about five years. Then forming a partnership with his son, Fred S. Gilbert, a master plumber and sheet metal worker, under the firm name of Gilbert & Son, on August 1, 1900, they opened the present place of business at No. 424 East Main street, Visalia. This firm installed the plumbing in the Harvey Hotel, the Osborn House and a number of other buildings, including the new Sweet block and some of Visalia's finest homes. Fred S. Gilbert died in 1918, but the business has been continued under the old firm name.

Mr. Gilbert is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, being a past master of Porterville Lodge, a member of the Royal Arch chapter, a past commander of Visalia Commandery of Knights Templars, and a member of Islam Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. Fred S. Gilbert, his son, was a past master of Visalia Lodge No. 128, F. & A. M.

Samuel J. R. Gilbert was married to Miss Elizabeth Wilhelm in Shasta, January 1, 1866, and five of the children born to them are living: Mrs. F. W. Velie, whose husband is cashier of the First National Bank of Redding; Mrs. Eaton of Redding; Dr. G. W. Gilbert, a dentist of Fresno ; J. R. and Walter F. Gilbert. Mr. Gilbert has ten grandchildren and thirteen great-grandchildren living. Mrs. Gilbert passed away in Visalia, in April, 1905. Mr. Gilbert was married to his present wife, who was Ellen Frances Scott, on November 7, 1907, the mother of John W. and Lawrence F. Scott, two well known electricians, born and reared in Visalia.

A H CROSE

A. H. Crose has spent the greater part of his life in Tulare county and his persistent and commendable efforts have benefited himself and the community alike, for he has always had at heart the common welfare and has supported all movements for the betterment of the locality in which he lives. He is a successful ranch owner in Linder precinct, and was born the 2d day of January, 1869, in Napa county, California, one of seven children who blessed the union of Samuel and Elizabeth (Fowler) Crose. The other children of the family were: Ellen, John, Ione, Benjamin, James and Annie. Samuel Crose was a native of Missouri and his wife was born and reared in Iowa. They became acquainted in 1852, while crossing the plains en route to California in an ox team caravan. After reaching California Mr. Crose was for some time engaged in placer mining at Oroville, later ran a stage route and then opened an eating house in Napa. In 1879 he came to Tulare county and located on land near Porterville, but a year later he moved to what is now known as the Gianini ranch, of three hundred and twenty acres, northeast of Tulare. Two years later he moved to the old Dr. Alford farm, west of Pixley, where he lived until his retirement, when he moved into Tulare, where his death occurred in 1884.

A. H. Crose received his educational training in the public schools, and then took up ranching, which he has followed in Tulare county continuously since. He has resided on his present ranch for fifteen years and has been successful to a gratifying degree. He is the owner of fifty-five acres of good land, well improved and devoted to the raising of diversified crops.

Mr. Crose is a member of the Woodmen of the World. He is deeply interested in the public affairs of his community and served on the school board and the election board many years, being still a member of the latter board.

On July 7, 1892, Mr. Crose was married to Miss Annie Chandler, a native of Iowa, who was reared in California. Her father, Ruel Chandler, came to this state with his family in 1876 and took up farming, in which he was successful. To Mr. and Mrs Chandler have been born eleven children, as follow: Ruel, Charles, Arthur, Effie, Alcoe, Viola, Vivian, Harvey, Omar, Lila and Dorothy. Of these Charles, Ruel and Arthur were in the United States army during the World war, all having volunteered for service before the draft. In the summer of 1917 Charles, who was a member of a machine gun company, was wounded in action on the battle front in Nancy; Ruel also was in France, serving as sergeant in the Quartermaster Corps for two years; Arthur did not leave this country, having been engaged in construction work in Eastern camps. Mr. Crose is easily the peer of any of his fellows in the qualities that constitute good citizenship and he therefore commands the goodwill and confidence of his fellow citizens to a marked degree.

WILLIAM H ENGLISH

Lindsay's chief of police, William H. English, was born November 23, 1886, in Zenia, a son of Howard and Elizabeth (McCreary) English. He received a good public school education and when about twenty years of age came to California. Locating in Visalia, he was employed for a time by Charles Riley on a ranch. After a few months he came to Lindsay, which city has since been his home. He owns a comfortable residence at No. 463 Gale Hill Avenue, the product of his industry and frugality. For several years after coming to Lindsay he was employed on the adjacent ranches or in the fruit-packing houses.

In 1912 Mr. English was appointed night watchman, which position he held for eight years. During that time it was observed by the citizens of Lindsay that he was faithful and conscientious in the performance of his duty and in 1921 his fidelity was rewarded by his promotion to his present official position of chief of police. His experience while serving as night watchman taught him many things with regard to dealing with law-breakers, and the people of Lindsay are now reaping the fruits of this experience through his organization and management of the police force. Mr. English is a man of fine physique. He owns twenty- five acres of land south-west of Lindsay.

In 1916 Mr. English was united in marriage to Miss Hazel L. Warnes, a native of Missouri. One son, Paul Stanley English, has been born to this union and is now (1925) four years of age. Mr. English is a member of the Masonic fraternity and belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America.

EVERETT HOWELL

Everett Howell, manager of the Monache Theater at Porterville and one of the best known men in this section of the state, is a native son of Tulare county and has lived here all his life, active in theatrical affairs since the days of his young manhood. He was born on the old Howell ranch, west of the city of Porterville, May 6, 1888, and is a son of Thomas W. and Rhoda (Doss) Howell, the latter of whom, a native of Kentucky, is still living here. The late Thomas W. Howell, who in his generation was one of the active men of affairs of the Porterville community, was a Missourian by birth and early put in his lot with that of the people of the coast country. For some time after his marriage he made his home in Missouri and then established himself on a ranch west of Porterville, in Tulare county, California. He developed a good piece of property there and also took an active part in development work in the city, the substantial Howell building being a continuing monument to his enterprise as a community builder. He for some time served as a city trustee and in other ways did his part as a good citizen toward bringing about proper conditions there in the earlier period of the settlement, and here he spent his last days, his death occurring in 1920. To him and his wife were born eight children, four of whom were born in Missouri and four in California, and all are living, as is their mother.

Reared in Porterville, Everett Howell acquired his education in the schools of that city and for some time after leaving school was engaged working as a machinist, a trade which he learned thoroughly. When the Gaiety Theater began showing motion pictures back in the days of the beginning of that form of popular entertainment, Mr. Howell became connected with that enterprise as the operator of the projection machine and there learned the motion picture business as related to the exhibitor's end of it "from the ground up." In 1916 he and his brother, C. C. Howell, in association with A. R. Moore, a veteran theatrical man and old-time photographer of Porterville, erected the Monache Theater in Porterville, including in the plans of this edifice features that theretofore had not been carried in motion picture theaters in that city, and began to put on not only the best of the pictures produced but brought in standard companies for dramatic performances and set a new standard of entertainment in the town. When on February 1, 1924, this theater was taken over by the National Theater Syndicate of California, Everett Howell was made its manager and since has been acting in that capacity, giving the best of his experienced service to the promotion of the interests of this popular playhouse, one of the most attractive in this section of the state.

On April 14, 1920, in Porterville, Everett Howell was united in marriage to Miss Edith Althouse, who was born in Los Angeles, this state, daughter of Jas. A. Althouse. Mr. and Mrs. Howell have one child: A son, James Everett Howell, born October 28, 1921. The Howells have a pleasant home in Porterville and Mr. and Mrs. Howell take an interested and helpful part in the city's general social activities. Mr. Howell is a charter member of the locally influential Rotary Club and is also a member of Porterville Lodge No. 1342, of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

JAMES D MUNSON

That, after many years of residence in various sections of the country, a man should at last select Tulare county as his permanent home is a rare compliment to this locality, and it is a compliment worthily bestowed to say that the town of Goshen has profited by his public spirit and energetic business methods. James D. Munson, the gentleman referred to, was born in Mattoon, Illinois, on the 5th day of November, 1856, the son of James and Sarah (Montieth) Munson, the former a  native of Kentucky and the latter of Indiana. James D. Munson's paternal great-grandfather, Isaac Munson, went into Kentucky in an early day, being a companion and fellow woodsman of Daniel Boone. In 1836 he moved to Illinois, where they remained until 1869, when they moved to Henry county, Missouri, where the parents spent the rest of their days. James D. Munson was reared on his father's farm and secured his education in the common schools. He accompanied the family on their migration to Missouri in 1869, and lived there until 1876, when he came to California. He spent five years on the coast, mining and dealing in cattle, but in 1881 he returned to Missouri, where he remained four years. During this period he was married and in 1885 went to New Mexico, and lived near Santa Fe, where he was car inspector for the Santa Fe Railroad for fifteen years. In 1905 Mr. Munson came to Tulare county and a few months later went to Goshen, where he bought the townsite of about two thousand city lots. He has lived here continuously since and has been largely instrumental in promoting the growth and subsequent development of this now thriving town. He became interested in the hotel and saloon business, later ran a lunch counter, to which he afterward added soft drinks, and is now interested in the operation of a small dairy. At all times he has been loyal to the commercial interests of his home town and has supported with his time and means every movement launched for the betterment of the community. He has served a number of terms as a member of the school board and frequently as a member of the election board.

Mr. Munson was married to Miss Effie Meacham, a native of Missouri, and they have become the parents of four children, namely; Ethel, who is the wife of Harry Starbuck of Bakersfield, California; Ray, of Goshen; Cecile, the wife of Harry Galyan of Goshen; and Helen, who remains at home and assists her father in the store. Politically Mr. Munson is a democrat.

IRVIN H BETTS, M D

Although one of the youngest of Visalia's physicians and surgeons, Dr. Irvin H. Betts is well known and deservedly popular, not only as a medical man, but also as a citizen. He was born in Hames Valley, Monterey county, California, September 28, 1889. His father, Charles H. Betts, was born in California, and his mother, whose maiden name was Florence Baugh, was born in Texas.

Irvin H. Betts acquired his education in the public schools of Salinas ,California, and in 1911 received the degree of Bachelor of Science from the University of California. He then entered the medical department of that institution and was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1915. The first year after his graduation was spent in the University Hospital of San Francisco, after which he practiced for a year in the San Francisco Hospital. When the United States entered the World war in 1917 he joined the Medical Corps of the United States army, with the rank of first lieutenant and spent nine months in Siberia as an army surgeon.

Upon being discharged from military service he returned to California, and on June 1, 1919, he located in Visalia, where he has built up a good practice and maintains a high professional standing. Dr. Betts is vice president of the Tulare County Medical Association and holds membership in the California State and the American Medical Associations. Ten years have passed since he received his degree of M.D., yet during that time he has kept in close touch with the progress of medical science through reading the leading medical journals, the study of new textbooks, etc. While a medical student he became a member of the Nu Sigma Nu fraternity.

In 1919 Dr. Betts was united in marriage to Miss Vinita Britner, a native of Georgia, and they have two children: Vinita E., aged six years; and Irvin Hiram, Jr., aged two years. In the clubs and fraternal societies of Visalia Dr. Betts is a familiar figure. He is vice president of the local Red Cross, a member of the Visalia Rotary Club, belongs to the American Legion and Visalia Lodge No. 1298, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is also a member of the Forty and Eight, and wields an influence in various ways for the advancement of Visalia's social and civic interests.

CLAYTON HICKLE

Among the energetic and enterprising young men who in late years have created so distinct an impress upon development operations in Tulare county and throughout this section of California, there are few who have entered more whole-heartedly into the real spirit of this development movement than has Clayton Hickle, secretary of the Porterville Chamber of Commerce, a veteran of the World war and a school trained orchardist and fruit-grower, proprietor of a well kept orange grove in the Success valley and an active factor in Farm Bureau work hereabout, secretary of the Success center of that bureau and enthusiastically interested in its activities. Though a native of the old Hawkeye state, Mr. Hickle has been a resident of California since the days of his boyhood and is thus thoroughly familiar with conditions here. He was born in the thriving little city of Clarksville, Butler county, in north central Iowa, January 16, 1895, and is a son of John and Abbie (Gilbert) Hickle, who in 1912 came to California with their family and located in Selma, Fresno county.

Clayton Hickle was seventeen years of age when he came with his parents to California and he completed his education in the high school at Selma. He early became interested in agricultural processes and development, with particular interest on the possibilities inherent in hor­ticultural operations, and after leaving the high school he entered the California Agricultural College at Davis, a branch of the University of California, and was completing his course in that school when in 1917 he answered the call of the country for service in the World war and was assigned to the medical department of the Ninth Ambulance Corps, stationed in the Hawaii Islands, where he was in service until 1919. 

Upon the completion of his military service in 1919 Mr. Hickle came to Tulare county and making Porterville his headquarters became engaged in contract development work in the orange groves of this district. His services in that connection were in demand and he did a fine work in that behalf, it not being long until he became recognized as a valuable factor in local orchard operations. Presently Mr. Hickle bought a twenty-acre ranch in the Success valley eight miles east of Porterville and began growing oranges on his own account, a venture which has worked out quite successfully. As noted above, he is the secretary of the local center of the farm bureau movement in that part of the county and in that capacity has done much in the way of giving proper direction to horticultural processes and in standardizing these operations in accordance with local conditions, as well as stabilizing the local market for the products of the orchards and gardens. Mr. Hickle's activity and success as an organizer attracted the attention of the Porterville Chamber of Commerce and in the spring of 1924 he was appointed the secretary of that body. His effective labors in this behalf proved so satisfactory that in the spring of 1925 he was reappointed to this responsible position and he thus now is serving in his second term as secretary of the chamber, having during this tenure of office done much to extend the service of that important trade body. Mr. Hickle is an active member of Porterville Post No. 20 of the American Legion and has given his earnest attention to the affairs of that patriotic organization.

On September 7, 1920, in Lindsay, Clayton Hickle was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Adelaide Wilson, who was born in New Jersey, daughter of Frank and May (Knieper) Wilson, and who became a resident of California in 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Hickle have one child: A son, Clayton Hickle, Jr. They have a pleasant home in Porterville and since taking up their residence there have contributed pleasantly to the city's general social interests.

F J HESSE

In the death of F. J. Hesse, which occurred on January 27, 1916, there passed away one of the most beloved and appreciated men who has ever honored Tulare county with his citizenship—loved because of the kindly relations which always existed between him and all with whom he came into contact; and appreciated because of his sterling integrity, marked business ability and strength of character. Although modest and unassuming and always easily approached, he had a sturdy and vigorous personality and in the best sense of the term was a leader of men, exerting a large influence in the civic life of his community. F. J. Hesse was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 26th day of January, 1852. His father, William Hesse, was a physician by profession and eventually moved with his family to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and, still later to Emporia, Kansas, where in the early '70s he homesteaded land, being one of the pioneers of that locality.

F. J. Hesse acquired his education in the public schools and his early years were spent on the farm. In 1882 he was married and two years later he came to California. A year was spent in traveling along the coast and another year in Santa Rosa. In 1886 he came to Tulare county and entered a homestead six miles west of Tipton. He was successful in his farming operations and from time to time invested in additional land until at the time of his death he was the owner of five thousand acres of splendid land and was numbered among Tulare's biggest ranchers and cattlemen. In addition to diversified farming he gave considerable attention to dairying, for which he installed the best equipment obtainable. His farms all contained good houses, barns, shade trees and ornamental shrubbery was planted where it would be the most effective. Mr. Hesse was a lover of the beautiful in nature and to him one of its best expressions was in the form of trees and shrubbery. The school grounds in his community were benefited by his generosity along this line and are now silent witnesses to his kindliness and thoughtfulness.

Personally Mr. Hesse's life was beautifully epitomized by a lifelong friend in the following words: "A devoted husband and father, loved by all who knew him, a successful man of affairs, of spotless integrity, a clear-headed optimist, an ideal gentleman and citizen." His career was rounded in its beautiful simplicity, for he did his full duty in all the relations of life, and it is safe to say that no man in the community in which he lived enjoyed to a greater extent the affection and confidence of the people than did Mr. Hesse.

On August 1, 1882, Mr. Hesse was married to Miss Catharine Barnesberger of Marshall, Illinois, and they became the parents of four children, namely: William, who died of the flu in 1918, at the age of thirty-four years, just as he was about to join the army; Lena, who is the wife of Dr. Roy N. Fuller of Tulare; Frank J., who assists in the operation of the ranch, but who resides at No. 880 Sycamore street, Tulare, and Russell E. S., who is unmarried and resides at home with his mother. The family has resided since leaving the ranch in 1911, at No. 105 H street, Tulare, their home being one of the most commodious and attractive in the city.

History of Tulare County California: By Kathleen Edwards Small
History of Kings County, California: By J Larry Smith
Volume 1 - Chicago - The S J Clarke Publishing Co, 1926

Transcribed by: Martha A Crosley Graham, Pages: 4 - 93
Biography Pages Created: 28 June 2009

Rights Reserved: 2017

Updated: 14 September 2017

Tulare County Biographies