Tulare and Kings Counties, California

Biographies
1926

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MARCUS C. CARTER.

Deeds are thoughts crystallized, and according to their brilliancy do we judge the worth of a man to the country which produced him, and in his works we expect to find the true index to his character. Marcus C. Carter, chairman of the board of supervisors of Kings county, has had a record of accomplishment and activity that at once indicates his industry, enterprise and progressive spirit, and today no man in Kings county enjoys to a more marked degree the confidence and respect of the people. He was born in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, on the 12th day of August, 1856. In 1877 he came to that part of Tulare county which is now Kings, settling on the west side. He was first employed in ranch work, one of his early employers having been Walter Crow, who was one of the unfortunate victims of the famous Mussel Slough tragedy. In 1878 Mr. Carter started to farm on his own account, combining farming and stock raising, and through the subsequent years he has prospered and has been numbered among the successful ranchers of Kings county. He is the owner of two forty-acre ranches. The one north of Lemoore he developed himself and it is mainly devoted to peaches, alfalfa and dairying. The one south of Lemoore is in apricots, grapes and alfalfa. Mr. Carter always took an active part in the development of the district along all legitimate lines and was especially interested in irrigation projects. He assisted in the development of a number of ditches and was president of the York ditch. He is now serving his second term as supervisor of the county. There are in his district one thousand miles of public highway, all of which he is caring for in the best possible manner. He constructed thirty-five miles of highway through the district which connects with the Chalam highway to the sea and is as fine a piece of highway as there is in Kings county. This road, forming a part of the highway from the valley to the ocean, is a valuable factor in the development of Kings county and Mr. Carter has been universally commended for his persistent efforts to put this county in the forefront among the up-to-date and progressive counties of the state. Mr. Carter has ever taken a keen interest in educational matters and rendered efficient service as a trustee of the Paddock school district, while for four years he was a member of the board of trustees of the city of Lemoore.

Mr. Carter is a member of Lemoore Lodge, F. & A. M., and to him has been given the unusual honor of having been six times elected wor­shipful master of his lodge.

On February 14, 1880, Mr. Carter was married to Mary Louisa Blevins, and to them four children were born : George Perkins, deceased ; Homer D.; Ruby Maud, deceased, and Gertie A., wife of Benjamin Davis of Fresno. The mother died April 10, 1910. Mr. Carter was married on August 12, 1914, to Miss Ireda Epperson, a native of Mendocino, California. Mr. Carter is one of Kings county’s most highly esteemed pioneer citizens and here he has played most excellently his part in the drama of civilization. There is in him a weight of character and a fidelity of pur­pose that has commanded the respect of all who know him and he is eminently deserving of specific mention in the history of his community.

ABNER JAMES OVERSTREET.

In these days of intensive living, one of the most prominent features of which is the tremendous development of the automobile as a means of transportation, the regulation of traffic on the public highways has become one of the big problems of the day. An important factor in the proper handling of this traffic is the force of highway police, or traffic officers, who now patrol the main or arterial highways, safeguarding the thousands who daily pass to and fro on business or pleasure. As cap­tain of motor traffic officers in Kings county, Abner James Overstreet has won an enviable reputation for faithful performance of duty under any and all circumstances, and is regarded as an unusually efficient public servant. He was born at Whiskey Diggings, Sierra county, Califor­nia, on the 30th day of August, 1879, the son of Lawrence D. and Emma (Rankin) Overstreet. Lawrence D. Overstreet was a native of the state of Illinois, but in 1865, in young manhood, he became a pioneer to the Pacific coast, locating in the gold region of Sierra county, California, where he spent a number of years. Eventually he returned to Illinois, where his death occurred. He is survived by his widow, who resides in Rockford, that state.

Abner James Overstreet received his education in the public schools of Illinois, graduating from high school. His first employment was in connection with the manufacture of hosiery, with the production of which he became thoroughly familiar in every phase, having served in every position from knitter to foreman. In 1920 Mr. Overstreet returned to his native state and for two years was with the San Joaquin Light & Power Company. He then became a state traffic officer and, later, when the patroling of highways was taken over by the counties, he was retained on the local force, with the rank of captain. While his force is not a large one it is one of the most efficient and capable traffic squads in the state, and to the wise direction of Captain Overstreet is given the credit for this high standing. He is liked by the men under him and because of his accomplishments in this line of duty, he has won the respect and confidence of the public.

Captain Overstreet was married to Miss Alice Garey, who was born and reared in Rockford, Illinois. Because of his sterling honesty, his courage and public spirit, he is eminently deserving of the popularity which he enjoys throughout Kings county. Captain Overstreet is a republican in his political affiliation and is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Fond of hunting and fishing, he is a firm believer in outside recreation and in the benefits derived from personal familiarity with Nature.

FREDERICK M. HALL.

If it is proper to judge of the status of a man’s life by the estimation in which he is held by his fellow citizens, then Frederick M. Hall must possess the elements essential to a well-rounded life, for to a marked degree he enjoys the good will and esteem of his fellowmen. He is engineer of the pumping station of the Hanford fire department, and is a Yankee by nativity, born in Bath, Maine, on the 26th day of October, 1856.

Frederick M. Hall attended the schools of his native city during his early youth, but at the age of sixteen years he laid aside his textbooks and went to sea as a sailor before the mast. For ten years he was on full-rigged ships and when he finally relinquished his sea career he was second mate Among the more famous ships on which he sailed were the Three Brothers, the Solitar and the Alameda, in which he visited all the leading seaports of the world, making a number of trips around Cape Horn to San Francisco. He first sailed through the Golden Gate in 1877 and his last trip there was on the Thomas B. Reed in 1880. On May 1st of that year Mr. Hall came to the San Joaquin valley and during the following fifteen, years was employed with threshing machines and as a farm hand on the Howell ranch. During that period his operations covered a wide range of country, he having threshed grain from San Luis Obispo, on the coast, to the Sierra Nevada mountains, on the east. For a while he was employed in sawmills at Pine Ridge, Fresno county, and then, coming to Hanford, he was engineer in mines for five years. About fifteen years ago he helped to install the machinery in the pumping plant of the Hanford fire department, on South Irwin street, and was appointed engineer. Subsequently he resigned that position and became night engineer at the Hanford Cannery, where he remained for five years and then saw service with the California Packing Company plant. In 1917 he made a trip to his native city in Maine, and upon his return again became engineer at the pumping plant. He is the owner of some valuable real estate in Hanford.

Mr. Hall was married to Miss Augustine Dolan, who was born and reared in Tulare, member of a prominent old pioneer family of this section of the state. Her death occurred on January 24, 1894. They were the parents of two children : George E. and Marvel. George E. Hall, who was born and reared in Kings county, saw active service in the United States army during the World war and is now branch man­ager of the United Motor Service Company, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and of the Masons. He is married and is the father of two children, Robert and Richard. Marvel Hall became the wife of Dr. Sidney Abbens of San Francisco.

RUPERT C. KENDALL.

A man who boldly faces the responsibilities of life and by determined and untiring energy carves out for himself an honorable success, deserves recognition in a specific way from his fellowmen, for such men constitute the foundation of our republican institutions and are the pride of our civilization. Rupert C. Kendall, the efficient and popular manager of the Tilden Lumber Company in Hanford, belongs to this class, for his success has been attained solely through his own efforts. He was born in Dayton, Ohio, on the 14th day of June, 1882, and was but eight years of age when brought by his parents to Kings county, then Tulare county.

Rupert C. Kendall was educated in the public schools of Armona and Hanford, and at the age of sixteen years he left home to make his own way in the world. Going to Los Angeles, he secured employment as a shipping clerk in a planing mill, and was so occupied for six years. At the end of that period he returned to Hanford and became assistant foreman in the Gurnee planing mill. About ten years ago he entered the employ of the Lucerne Lumber Company of Hanford, now owned by the Tilden Lumber Company. Originally the plant was known as the Hague Mill & Lumber Company, established about seventeen years ago, and then owned and operated by local people. It was bought by the Charles Nelson Company of San Francisco, and called the Lucerne Lumber Company up to the time it was bought by the Tilden Lumber Company of Oakland, California. This well known corporation operates twenty-six lumberyards in this state. Mr. Kendall entered this plant as yardmaster, later becoming bookkeeper, and since 1918 has been manager, in which responsible position he has proven an able and com­petent agent of the company.

Mr. Kendall was married to Miss Edna Douglass, a native of Arkansas, and to them have been born two sons : Brewster and Burke. Mrs. Kendall is a member of the Pythian Sisters. Mr. Kendall is regarded as a good business man, possessing sound judgment and keen foresight, and because of his interest in public affairs and his honorable career he enjoys the confidence and esteem of the entire community.

Mr. Kendall has always taken a deep interest in fraternalism, and is a member of the following orders : Hanford Aerie No. 652, Fraternal Order of Eagles, of which he is worthy president ; the Knights of Pythias, of which he is a past chancellor commander ; the Woodmen of the World, of which he is master of work ; Lodge No. 546, Loyal Order of Mouse, at Visalia ; Al Sakhrat Lodge, Dramatic Order Knights of Khorassan, of Fresno ; the Hoo-Hoo, a lumbermen’s organization ; the Kings County Chamber of Commerce and the Hanford Chamber of Commerce, of both of which he is a member of the board of directors.

JAMES ANDERSON.

Peculiar honor attaches to that individual who, beginning the active battle of life unaided, overcomes the obstacles in his pathway and by the virtue of his own force and vitality succeeds in forging his way to the front. Such is the record of James Anderson, the well known citizen of Hanford to whom these lines are devoted, and who holds the responsible position of district superintendent of the Southern California Edison Company at Hanford. He was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, on the 9th day of July, 1891.

James Anderson was educated in the public schools of Aberdeen and in 1906, when fifteen years of age, he emigrated to this country, locating first in London, Ontario, Canada, where he obtained employment as a boxmaker in a cigar factory. In 1909 he came to California, locating in Fountain Springs, near Portersville, Tulare county, where for two years he was employed on ranches. On March 17, 1911, he went to work for the Mount Whitney Power Company, digging post holes and doing other construction work. In 1912 he was made a lineman, and was so employed until December 20, 1912, when he went to work for the Tulare County Power Company as lineman, and later as foreman. On March 22, 1915, he returned to the Mount Whitney Power Company as lineman. On February 5, 1918, he entered the military service of the United States, being assigned to the Three Hundred and Nineteenth Regiment of Engineers, which became a part of the Eighth Division. He was sent over­seas and saw active service there until the end of the great struggle. Upon his return to civil life Mr. Anderson was employed as foreman by the Southern California Edison Company, with whom he has remained continuously since. On May 15, 1920, he was made assistant district superintendent, with headquarters in Visalia, and on June 1, 1921, was made superintendent of the Kings county division. His position carried with it a large measure of responsibility, but Mr. Anderson, by faithful and conscientious attention to details, has performed his duties to the entire satisfaction of his superiors.

Mr. Anderson was married to Ruth Kalbfleich, a native of North Dakota. He is a member of Visalia Lodge No. 128, F. & A. M., and exem­plifies in his life the beneficent principles of that time-honored order. A plain, unassuming gentleman, straightforward in all his relations with his fellowmen, he enjoys the confidence and esteem of all who know him.

JULIUS H. FOX.

In the early days the Pacific coast was often a tempting field to ener­getic, ambitious, strong-minded men, and California was filled with them during the time she was struggling up to a respectable position in the sisterhood of states. There was a fascination in the broad field and great promise which the new region offered to activity and originality, which attracted many men, and it was this class more than any other that gave shape, direction and character to the state. Julius H. Fox, one of the pioneer residents of Kings county and one of the most active men in its public affairs for many years, became identified with this locality in an early day and through all the subsequent years he has been a potent factor in its development. He was born in Steuben county, Indiana, on the 23d day of October, 1846, the son of Joel A. and Sarah G. (Barry) Fox, the former of whom was a native of Massachusetts and the latter of Vermont.

Julius H. Fox was reared and educated in his native county and at the age of eighteen years he enlisted in the Eleventh Regiment of Michi­gan Volunteer Infantry. This was near the close of the war, but he saw some active service in the south before the end of the struggle. The family came to California in 1873, traveling by railroad on an emi­grant train which required ten days to make the run from Chicago to Los Angeles. Upon reaching the latter place they bought one hundred and thirty acres of land, where now is the corner of Seventh and Olive streets, for thirty-two hundred dollars. But their funds failed to arrive from the east in time for them to make the final payment when due, and they lost the land. However, they had brought with them five hundred portable bath tubs, which they sold here at a good profit and thus they were provided with funds with which to make a start in the new country.

Julius Fox took up a soldier’s homestead and filed a pre-emption claim on a piece of land between Traver and Dinuba, in Tulare county, and gave his attention to the farming of this land. Later the family moved to the spot where Lemoore now stands and in 1877, in connection with Dr. L. L. Moore, the father bought one hundred and sixty acres nearby and Julius Fox’s father-in-law, Dr. L. Lee Moore, bought one hundred and sixty acres on the present site of the city. Dr. L. Lee Moore was the pioneer physician of this locality, practicing his profession here for many years, and the town of Lemoore was named in his honor. Mr. Fox is now the owner of two valuable and highly improved ranches, of eighty and one hundred and forty acres respectively. In 1924 he sold twenty-one acres, the site of the new Lemoore Union high school, for twenty-one thousand dollars. For twenty-two years Mr. Fox was a mem­ber of the leading mercantile firm in Lemoore, he and B. K. Sweetland forming the well known firm of Fox & Sweetland. They sold their busi­ness in 1906.

Mr. Fox has taken an active part in practically all local public movements and has been honored in various ways. He was an alternate delegate to the Republican National convention at Chicago which nominated Theodore Roosevelt for the presidency; was a member of the board of supervisors of Tulare county in 1890, and became chairman of the first board of supervisors of Kings county after the organization of the county in 1893 ; is a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Lemoore; and was formerly a director of the Kings River Ditch Company. He was a member of the school board of Lemoore at the time of the construction of the first modern school building erected here.

In 1868 Mr. Fox was married, in Sturgis, Michigan, to Miss Emma Moore, the daughter of Dr. L. Lee Moore. Mr. and Mrs. Fox have a son : Lynn, who is an accomplished musician and successful violin teacher. Mrs. Lynn Fox is a popular teacher in the Lemoore schools. Mr. Fox was a charter member of the Lemoore Masonic lodge and there is but one other surviving charter member. He is a past master of his lodge. He is also a charter member of the Masonic Club of San Francisco. He was one of the founders of Union Post, Grand Army of the Republic, in Lemoore, and of the original thirty members only three are now living.

CLARENCE L. LEWIS.

One of the worthy native sons of Kings county is Clarence L. Lewis of Stratford, who has spent practically his entire life in this locality and is held in high esteem by those who know him. He was born near Han­ford, on the 5th day of October, 1885, the son of R. M. and Melissa (Thomas) Lewis, both of whom are natives of California. Clarence Z. Lewis’ grandfather, Joshua Lewis, was a native of Kentucky, but came to California in the early ‘50s. He made three trips across the conti­nent by ox team, and was captain of one caravan. He came to Tulare county about 1880 and was one of the petitioners of Alta district, in Tulare county. Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Lewis are now living in Dinuba.

Clarence L. Lewis spent his early years on his father’s farm and secured a good public school education, attending the high school and also spent one year at Eugene Bible University, Eugene, Oregon. He was ordained to the ministry in the Christian church in 1911, but held no regular work. He devoted practically all of his time to farming until 1915, when he took a course in bookkeeping, which vocation he fol­lowed until 1923, when he became area salesman, later Auxiliary Station Special Agent for the Standard Oil Company, with headquarters in Stratford. In this work he has been very successful, for he not only possesses good judgment and selling ability, but he also combines in his make-up those qualities which attract men, so that he has won and retains a host of warm and loyal friends throughout the locality where he has spent his life.

Mr. Lewis was married to Miss Vivian Dold, a native of Indiana, and they are the parents of two children : Edward and John. Mrs. Lewis is a member of the Neighbors of Woodcraft, and is vice president of the Stratford Women’s Club. Mr. Lewis is a member of the Woodmen of the World. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis move in the best social circles of the community and are extremely popular among their acquaintances.

H. H. HAUDYSHELL.

Among the enterprising and successful institutions which are con­tributing to the commercial prosperity of Hanford, specific mention should be made of the Hanford Bakery, owned and operated by H. H. Haudyshell. He was born in Waterloo county, Iowa, on the 17th day of September, 1886. In his childhood the family moved to Bourbon county, Kansas, and settled on a farm and there he was reared to manhood, acquiring his education in the district schools of that locality. In 1908 he went to Great Bend, Kansas, and learned the baking trade, at which he was employed for two years. In 1910 he engaged in business on his own account, but later sold out and acquired a bakery in Garden City, Kansas. In May, 1923, he came to California, locating in Hunting­ton Beach. In September of that year he came to Hanford and bought of Adolph Scheffler the bakery which he now operates, at No. 210 West Fourth street. This is the oldest bakery in Kings county, having been established here some thirty years ago by Mr. Trosch, a native of Switzerland. It passed through a number of hands during the years since then, but seems now to have come into the right hands to be made a large success. Mr. Haudyshell makes the popular “Butter Crisp” bread, of which he distributes over fifteen hundred loaves daily, and his business doubled in volume during the first year under his management. Mr. Haudyshell has shown a public-spirited attitude since becoming identi­fied with this community, giving his earnest support to every movement for the community welfare and is eminently deserving of the high posi­tion which he occupies in popular esteem.

Mr. Haudyshell was married to Miss Elsie Bayon, who was born and reared in Fort Scott, Kansas, and to them have been born two children: Jack and Beverley. Mr. Haudyshell is a member of the Inde­pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Woodmen of the World.

O’BRIEN BROTHERS.

Probably no industry in Hanford is more generally or widely known in Kings county than the O’Brien Brothers Bakery, the product of which is used far and wide over this county. The excellency of this product is not mere chance, but is the result of the most painstaking care in the mixing of ingredients and their care afterward until the loaf is ready for the consumer. From twenty-five hundred to three thousand loaves are baked daily and the demand for “O’Brien Bread” is constantly and steadily increasing. Three delivery trucks are kept constantly busy de­livering to the west side towns and cities of the county and to the local stores. Eleven different kinds of bread are baked and in the bake shop three men are employed on pastry and four on bread. The O’Brien brothers bought this bakery in 1920 and, at a cost of approximately twenty-five thousand dollars, they transformed the place into a modern, up-to-date plant, equal to anything in this part of the state. The improvements included a continuous fire oven, and mechanical dividers, rounders and moulders. A concrete floor was laid in the workroom and the building was renovated throughout. When O’Brien brothers began operations here ninety per cent of the bread used in Kings county came from Fresno, but now the latter place supplies only ten per cent of the local demand.

James J. O’Brien, senior member of the firm of O’Brien Brothers, was born in Waterbury, Vermont, on the 27th day of January, 1882. He was educated in the public schools of his native locality and in 1899, at the age of seventeen years, came to California. Locating in Oakland, he learned the trade of a baker in the shop of the Merrick Baking Company, for whom he worked eight years. From there he went to Los Angeles, where he worked for the Meek Bakery Company for a time, going from there to Portland, Oregon, where he was for a time in the employ of the United States Baking Company. Eighteen years ago Mr. O’Brien went to Santa Cruz, California, where he was associated with a brother, G. A. O’Brien, in the baking business. In 1920 Mr. O’Brien ­came to Hanford and with his brother, Andrew J., formed the partner­ship which now exists as O’Brien Brothers.

James J. O’Brien is a member of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevo­lent Protective Order of Elks, and the Knights of Columbus. In 1914 he was married to Miss Sarah Mullins.

Andrew J. O’Brien was born in Waterbury, Vermont, on the 15th day of September, 1892. He attended the public schools there and re­mained at home until 1909, when, at the age of seventeen years, he went to Santa Cruz, California, and became associated in the baking business with his brothers, G. A. and J. J. O’Brien. In 1920 he came to Hanford and engaged in the same business with his brother, James J. During the World war Mr. O’Brien enlisted for military service in the Three Hundred and Nineteenth Regiment of United States Engineers, which became a part of the Eighth Division. He was in training at Camp Fre­mont, California, and then went overseas, where he was engaged in con­struction work until August 15, 1919, when he returned to the United .9’ hates and was discharged at Camp Devins, Massachusetts. He is a member of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and the Knights of Columbus.

The O’Brien brothers, though comparative newcomers to Hanford, have already demonstrated in an unmistakable way not only their sound business ability and enterprising methods, but have also impressed their fellow citizens with their public-spirited interest in the welfare of the community, while their genial and accommodating manner has won them a host of warm friends.

WILLIAM R. MCKAY.

One of the ablest and most popular members of the legal profession in Kings county is the present district attorney, William R. McKay. He is a native of4:1,alifornia, born in Tres Pinos, San Benito county, on the 18th day of August, 1895. He is a son of Dr. John G. and Katherine (Nicholson) McKay, the latter of whom sacrificed her life when William R. was born. John G. McKay was a graduate of the Medical College of Harvard University, being fortunate in having for his instructor Oliver Wendell Holmes, who was not only a scientist of great attainment, but who will also ever stand in the front rank of America’s writers. Among Dr. McKay’s cherished possessions was a book by Dr. Holmes, auto­graphed by the writer. Going to Prince Edward Island, John G. McKay attained to considerable local prominence, serving as commissioner of roads for the island and also as judge of one of the inferior courts. In 1890 he came to California, locating in San Francisco, where he engaged in the active practice of his profession. While the family was tempor­arily in Tres Pinos, William R. of this review, was born. Eventually he moved to Los Angeles, where he spent the remainder of his years, dying there in 1901.

Bereft of his mother at his birth, at the age of five years William R. McKay was taken into the home of his half-brother, A. L. McKay, a well known druggist in Lemoore, California, and was there reared. He graduated from the Lemoore high school in 1913 and then became a student in the University of California, from which he was graduated in 1917, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, having specialized in jurisprudence. He then enlisted in the United States army and, because of his knowledge of law, was assigned to detached service in the provost marshal’s office in San Francisco, where he gave effective service for eight months. In 1919 Mr. McKay entered Leland Stanford University and took a postgraduate course, being admitted to the bar in August of the following year. He then came to Hanford and during the years of 1920 and 1921 taught in the grammar school. On June 1, 1921, he was ap­pointed deputy district attorney under J. W. Ferguson, who had known him since boyhood. So satisfactory were the services rendered by him that in 1922 he was elected, without opposition, to the office of district attorney, assuming the office in January, 1923. As a lawyer Mr. McKay evinces a familiarity with legal principles and a ready perception of facts, with the ability to apply the one to the other, which has won him the reputation of a safe and sound practitioner, while in the conduct of his office he has consistently safeguarded the interests of the people and maintained the dignity of the law and the commonwealth.

Mr. McKay was married on June 25, 1925, in Hanford, to Frances Fern Russell, daughter of J. W. Russell, of this city. Mrs. McKay has served as principal of Hamilton grammar school of Hanford, and for four years prior to this, taught both here and in Merced. Mr. and Mrs. McKay are affiliated with the Presbyterian church.

Mr. McKay’s political belief is that embodied in the republican party platform and he takes a deep interest in public affairs. He is a past master in his lodge of Masons ; the esteemed loyal knight in the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks ; a past chancellor in the Knights of Pythias ; a past dictator in the Loyal Order of Moose ; a past patron of the Order of the Eastern Star, and also belongs to the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the American Legion, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Kiwanis Club. He is a lover of outdoor life and all forms of athletic sports, walking being one of his favorite forms of recreation. Genial and unassuming, he has won a host of loyal admirers since coming to this community and is deserving of the confidence which the people of Kings county repose in him.

F.   P. ARMI.

Among the comparatively recent additions to the mercantile estab­lishments of Hanford is the Quality bread bakery, established and still operated by F. P. Armi, who is realizing a gratifying success in his enterprise. He was born near Venice, Italy, on the 16th day of April, 1895, and received his education in the schools of his native land. At the age of eighteen years he came to the United States and on March 12, 1913, arrived in Hanford, where his brother Frank was then living. His first employment was on a farm, where he worked two days, and then took a job as driver of a bakery wagon for Samuel Adams. He then went to Dinuba and learned the trade of baking in the shop of the Testori bakery. Later he returned to Hanford and for a time was employed at various things until the entry of the United States into the World war, when he promptly enlisted for military service. He was sent to Camp Lewis, Washington, for training, and was assigned to the Three Hundred and Thirty-Eighth Baking Company, as a part of the Eighth Division He was promoted to corporal and was later sent to Camp Lee, Virginia, and eventually was sent to Camp Kearney, in California, where he re­ceived his discharge on January 16, 1919.

Returning to Hanford after leaving the army, Mr. Armi accepted a position as baker in the New French-American Bakery, where he was employed until June, 1924, when he established a baking business of his own. His ‘shop and store are located at No. 327 West Fifth street and he is producing a fine quality of bread and pastry, which he sells at both wholesale and retail. Many of the stores of Hanford are supplied by him and his trade is constantly and steadily increasing in volume.

Mr. Armi was married at Camp Fremont, by the chaplain of the Knights of Columbus, to Miss Amelie Plumel, who was born in Fresno, but reared in Kings county. To them have been born two sons : George and Robert. Mr. Armi is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Woodmen of the World, the Owls, and the American Legion. Genial and accommodating, and painstaking in the quality of his products, he is eminently deserving of the respect accorded him throughout the com­munity.

CHARLES F. HARRINGTON.

It is a well authenticated fact that success comes as the result of legitimate and well applied energy, unflagging determination and per­severance in a well-defined course of action. The truth of this statement has been abundantly verified in the career of Charles F. Harrington of Hanford, who has achieved a splendid success in his chosen field of effort. He was born in Peoria county, Illinois, on the 17th day of September, 1872, and was reared and educated in that locality. He learned the trade of a barber and for fifteen years followed that vocation in Princeville, Illinois. In 1902 he came to Hanford and for six years was employed at his trade here. He then bought a forty-five-acre ranch located seven miles southwest of this city and began the raising of Thompson seedless and Muscat grapes and apricots. In this enterprise he was successful, but desiring a large field of operation, about thirteen years ago he began dealing in turkeys, buying them in this locality and shipping them to city markets. His first experiences in this line were so satisfactory that he added dressed poultry to his line and has built up a business that exceeds in volume that of any similar line in this section of the country. During the last holiday season Mr. Harrington shipped fifteen hundred dressed turkeys weekly to the leading retail dealers in Los Angeles and San Francisco, and he gained the enviable reputation of getting his poultry to the market in better condition than any other shipper. It followed that he received better prices than other shippers and now has a ready market for everything he can produce or buy for the dealers. He recently established a branch store in Hanford for the receiving of eggs and poultry, operating this in connection with the plant at the ranch. He has made a thorough study of the poultry business and is acknowledged to be an expert in his line. He now practices Hoganizing which raises the quality of the chickens throughout the county. He has given close and painstaking attention to every detail of the business and the success which has crowned his efforts has been richly earned.

Mr. Harrington was married to Miss Grace Nichols, who was born and reared in Illinois, and to them have been born the following children : Harold E., who now is a partner with his father in the poultry business ; Clarence, a student in the University of California ; Helen, a graduate of the Hanford high school; Elbert, a student in high school, and Charles F., Jr. Personally Mr. Harrington is a splendid type of the self-made man, for he possesses to a high degree those elements that make men successful, preeminent among his qualities being that sound judgment which is ordinarily called common sense. Because of this, and for his genial and kindly manner, he enjoys the goodwill and respect of the entire community.

CLARK CLEMENT.

Among the worthy citizens of Lemoore whose efforts have contrib­uted in a very definite measure to the prestige of the legal profession, is Clark Clement, one of the best known attorneys in Kings county. By a life of high ideals and consistent action he has so impressed himself upon the community as to hold to a marked degree its confidence and respect.

Clark Clement was born in Prairie City, Oklahoma, on the 2d day of August, 1886. He secured his elementary education in the public schools and then entered Mercer University, from which he was grad­uated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Having determined to devote his life to the practice of law, he entered the Law School of the University of Michigan, from which he was graduated in 1914, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Soon afterward he went to San Francisco and entered upon the practice of his profession in the office of the late Judge John B. Clayberg, formerly chief justice of the state of Montana.

Upon the entry of the United States into the World war Mr. Clement offered his services to the government and was appointed chief drill master at the United States Naval Reserve Detention Camp, San Pedro, California. This was intensive work and Mr. Clement trained as many as nine thousand men, in successive groups of about fourteen hundred. When he had completed this work and been released from further war duties, Mr. Clement came to Lemoore and engaged in the practice of his profession. His ability and faithfulness were soon recognized and during, the subsequent years his practice has steadily increased until he is now numbered among the most successful lawyers in his community. He is a forceful and graceful speaker and is frequently in demand as the orator for special occasions. He is attorney for the public administrator of Kings county.

Mr. Clement was married to Miss Marjorie Guard of Fresno, Cali­fornia, a member of an old pioneer family. He is a member of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks ; Lemoore Post of the American Legion, of which he was one of the organizers and the first post commander. He has been prominent in Kiwanis circles and is lieu­tenant governor of Kiwanis Clubs for the California and Nevada district.

CLYDE WARES.

Clyde Wares, familiarly and popularly known as “Buzzy” Wares, who enjoys national fame as a successful baseball player, was born in Newburg, Cass county, Michigan, on the 23d day of March, 1886. From early boyhood he was passionately fond of the game of baseball, for which he had a natural aptitude, and he first gained attention by his playing on the Kalamazoo high school team and later on the team that represented Kalamazoo College. He has usually played shortstop, though frequently he has played at second or third base. His first professional experience was with the Hancock (Michigan) team in 1905, where he played third base. In 1907 he was with the Columbus team of the American Association, but during the latter part of that year and during 1908 and 1909 he played with the Zanesville team of the Central League. During the seasons of 1910 and 1911 he played with the Oakland team of the Pacific Coast League, followed by two seasons with the Montgomery (Alabama) team of the Southern League. In 1914 he was bought by the St. Louis American League team and played brilliantly in the inter­city series between the two major league teams, leading both teams at the bat throughout the series. Later he was for two months manager of the Wichita (Kansas) team of the Western League and was then sold to the Toronto Club of the International League, playing with that team during the season of 1915. During the two following seasons he played with Little Rock, of the Southern League, and in the seasons of 1918-19 he was again with the Oakland team of the Pacific Coast League. He took the managership of the Seattle team of the Pacific Coast League in 1920, when it was a tail-ender and brought it up to second place at the end of the season. During the past four seasons he has played with the Hanford team of the San Joaquin Valley League. Through his wide acquaintance and good standing in baseball circles, he has succeeded in bringing Hanford to the forefront as an ideal place for a spring training camp for baseball teams, inducing the Seattle team to train here in 1920, the Portland team in 1923 and the Kansas City team in 1925. The managers of these teams were unanimous in their praise of the climate, ball field and other accommodations which contributed to the success of their training seasons here. Mr. Wares is now operating the Brunswick cigar store, on Seventh street, Hanford. He is a genial and approachable man, with whom it is a pleasure to associate, and he enjoys the goodwill and regard of his host of friends.

Mr. Wares was married to Miss Gertrude Jones, who was born and reared in South Bend, Indiana, and they have one daughter : Betty Jeane. Mr. Wares is a member of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protec­tive Order of Elks.

ROY L. MAY.

Probably no science, excepting that of astronomy, requires as close calculations and painstaking exactitude as does that of civil engineering and as a rule he who is successful in this work is precise in every act of his life. Among the well known citizens of Kings county who have made their individuality felt in the community is the present county surveyor, Roy L. May. He is a native of Lincoln, Nebraska, born on the 8th day of October, 1888. In childhood he was brought by his parents to Kings county and acquired his public school education in Lemoore. He then entered the Polytechnic College of Engineering at Oakland, where he took the course in civil engineering. His first work was with the Engineering Corps in connection with the construction of the North­western Pacific Railroad, from 1908 to 1915. The corps went into the work with pack trains and came out on passenger trains upon the completion of the road. This was a valuable experience for the young engineer, as some of the problems accompanying the survey on that route were extremely difficult. Mr. May acted as chief assistant engineer for the Kings county highway commission during the good road building era in this county. In 1917 he was appointed surveyor of Kings county to fill out an unexpired term, and has since been twice elected to that office. In addition to his official duties Mr. May also has a large private practice and has been engaged in the laying out of a number of important subdivisions in this section of the country, prominent among which are the Armona Nos. One, Two and Three; the William Stanley subdivision at Goshen ; and the Home Gardens tract, south of Hanford. For the county, among other important work, he has built the Kings river bridge, near Kingsburg, two on the State highway near Lemoore and one on the Browndale road. He has also done much drainage, irrigation and reclamation work throughout the county and has earned a high reputation as a careful and accurate engineer.

Mr. May was married January 1, 1910, to Miss Elsie Williams, a native of Napa county, California, and they are the parents of three children, namely : Gladys, Doris and Robert.

Mr. May is a Mason, in which order he has taken the degrees of the blue lodge and chapter ; belongs to the Order of the Eastern Star, the Fraternal Order of Eagles; and the Woodmen of the World. Politically he is a republican. A man of vigorous mentality and strong moral fiber. Mr. May has always stood on the right side of every moral issue and has given his support to every movement for the betterment of the public welfare. BeCause of his splendid character and genuine worth he is deservedly popular throughout the county.

MAUD JUDKINS CLEVELAND.

Among the progressive, enterprising and successful business firms of Corcoran, none is held in higher esteem in the community than the in­surance and real estate agency conducted by Maud Judkins Cleveland. She was born near Newton, Kansas, the daughter of Richard J. and Jueritta (Bennett) Judkins, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Indiana. Her father was a veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted early in that struggle as a member of Company I of the Twenty-seventh Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with which command he served from August, 1861, until the close of the war, taking part in many of the most important campaigns and battles during that period. In the early ‘80s he .went to Kansas and homesteaded a farm, on which he lived until 1890, when he went to Newton, where Mr. Judkins served as sheriff for eight years. His next move was to Topeka, where they resided until the family came to California in 1908, those who came including the father and mother and their children—Ida May; Charles C., of San Bernardino ; Nellie (Mrs. Ward), of San Bernardino ; and Maud, the subject of this sketch.

Maud Judkins received .a good public school education and became an expert accountant. For some time she was employed as a bookkeeper by different firms and individuals in Corcoran, but since 1922 has carried on a special line of business on her own account, conducting an insurance agency and acting as real estate broker. She sells fire, automobile and casualty insurance and has handled a good many sales of real estate in this vicinity, always to the entire satisfaction of all parties interested.

She is also keeping books for Forrest Riley and F. A. Cleveland. She is a member of the Kings County Insurance Association and the Corcoran Chamber of Commerce. A lady of charming grace of manner, and at­tractive personality, sound judgment and keen discrimination, she has won and retains to a marked degree the esteem and confidence of the community and is a popular member of the social circles in which she moves.

Miss Judkins was married on June 22, 1925, to F. A. Cleveland, a rancher of Corcoran, who has been here about seventeen years, but is a native of Nebraska.

ALEXANDER W. BASS.

An enumeration of those men of the present generation who have won success and public recognition for themselves, and at the same time have honored the locality to which they belong, would be incomplete were there failure to make specific mention of Alexander W. Bass, probably the best known and most successful house mover in the entire San Joaquin valley, who was born in Springfield, Missouri, on the 30th day of October, 1861. He was reared under the parental roof and secured his education in the public schools of his native city. At the age of nineteen years he went to Boise City, Idaho, where for seven years he engaged in farming. In the spring of 1888 he came to Hanford, where for six months he was employed at farm labor, and then turned his at­tention to learning the carpenter trade. His first work was on the construction of the old Hanford flouring mill and he also helped twice to build the Artesia Hotel. In 1900, encouraged by the stories of great fortunes that were being brought out of the Alaskan gold fields, Mr. Bass went to Nome, Alaska. When he arrived there on June 1st the population consisted of about six hundred people, but in six weeks the population had jumped to thirty thousand. It was one of the greatest booms in the history of gold fields, and naturally thousands who went there were disappointed. Mr. Bass went there on a mining deal and was one of the few who came away with more money than he took with him.

After his Alaska experience Mr. Bass returned to Hanford and dur­ing the following three years worked on general construction work. He then engaged in business as a house mover and from that time-To- Hie present has stood in the front rank in that line of work. He has literally moved hundreds of houses and has had some extraordinary experiences and some very difficult and dangerous jobs. The longest distance he moved a house was fifty-two miles, from Delano, Kern county, to Han­ford, and the shortest move made was two feet. In a distance of eight blocks on Douty street, Hanford, practically every house was either erected by Mr. Bass or moved to that location by him. In 1907, after the earthquake, he went to Santa Rosa, Sonoma county, and spent eight months in wrecking buildings which had been ruined by the quake. He moved the Southern Pacific Railroad depot in Armona a mile and also moved the old Southern Pacific depot in Hanford. He moved seventy- five houses from the city of Tulare and has moved many ranch houses in various parts of the valley.

Politically Mr. Bass gives his support to the democratic party. He is now serving his third term as trustee of the city of Hanford. During his period of service on this board practically all of the modern improvements in Hanford have been made, including the fire protection system and most of the paved streets, and he was a member of the committee which had in charge the buying of the new truck for the fire department. He served as chief of the fire department in 1912 and for thirty-three years has been a volunteer member of the department, and, despite his age, he still responds to alarms and bears his full share of the work. For twenty-three years he has been a director of the Cemetery Association. Fraternally he is a member of the Woodmen of the World, the Knights of Pythias and the Knights of the Maccabees.

Mr. Bass was married on September 6, 1888, to Miss Alice Howard, of Visalia, and to them were born four children, namely : Ernest, who is in business in Long Beach, California ; Mrs. Ethel Mona of Hanford ; Mrs. Anita Saxon of Los Angeles ; and Edna, at home. Personally Mr. Bass enjoys marked popularity in his home community. While he has carried on a special line of business in such a manner as to gain a com­fortable competency for himself, he has also belonged to that class of representative citizens who promote the public welfare while advancing individual success. A man of great energy, he has carried rare judgment into every affair in which he has engaged, and has contributed in every way possible to the advancement and welfare of his community.

SAMUEL REHOEFER.

Samuel Rehoefer is a man who has lived to good purpose and achieved a greater degree of success than falls to the lot of the average individual. By a straightforward and commendable course he made his way to a leading position in the business world and is now able to lay aside the cares of mercantile affairs and enjoy the ease which he so richly earned. Samuel Rehoefer, a respected retired merchant of Hanford, was born in Bavaria, Germany, in July, 1851. In early childhood he was brought to the United States, the family settling in Louisville, Kentucky, when he was nine years of age.

Samuel Rehoefer attended the public schools of that city and in young manhood was employed as clerk in various stores in Selma, Alabama; Victoria, Texas ; Fort Worth, Texas, and other places. In 1878 he came to California, working first as a clerk in a store in Stockton, but later went to Dixon, Solano county. Eventually he went to Fresno, where he entered the employ of the Kutner-Goldstein Company, working in the dry goods department by the side of Mr. Kutner. Later that firm opened a branch store in Centerville and Mr. Rehoefer became a partner in the business there. This store was destroyed by fire and the Kutner-Goldstein Company in 1882 opened a branch store in Hanford. This store, which was located on Sixth street, was at first fifty by one hundred and fifty feet in size, but the growth in the business necessitated enlargement of the room to twice that size. Mr. Rehoefer was made manager of this new store and retained that position until 1904, when he resigned and entered into a partnership with F. J. Steel. They bought the Taylor Shoe Company’s business and stock, changed the name to Steel & Rehoefer, and continued in business together for twelve years, at the end of which time Mr. Rehoefer sold his interest and retired from active business. This store is now known as the Kings Shoe Company. Many years ago Mr. Rehoefer bought the lot at No. 207 Donty street and later erected a business block on it, now bearing his name, the building being eighty feet front by one hundred and twenty-five feet deep. Though nominally retired from active business pursuits, Mr. Rehoefer has not abated his public-spirited interest in the welfare of the community and is an ardent supporter of every movement for the benefit of the public. A kindly, genial gentleman, he has won a host of warm personal friends throughout the county.

Mr. Rehoefer is a Mason, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite ; belongs to the Order of the Eastern Star ; the Knights of Pythias, and Islam Temple of the Mystic Shrine, at San Francisco.

JAMES MELVIN McCLELLAN.

A gentleman who really merits the honorable title of Old Timer, and who through a long life has witnessed and taken an active part in the wonderful transformation which has taken place in this state in the last three-quarters of a century, is James Melvin McClellan, justice of the peace in Hanford. He is a native of the Golden state, born in Santa Clara county, California, February 26, 1854, the son of William...T._ and Evaline (Dickey) McClellan, the former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Virginia. The father also bore the distinction of having been a “Forty niner”, having crossed the plains with an ox team, which re­quired six months to make the trip, and arriving here in the eventful year of 1849. He settled in the Santa Clara valley, where he became a successful grain farmer. To this honored old pioneer couple were born the following children : Levina, Wallace, Anna, Theodore C., Joseph, James M., Frank and Grace. Of these Wallace, Anna and Joseph are deceased.

When a young man of twenty years James Melvin McClellan came to Tulare county and for a time worked for wages on ranches and in sawmills in the mountain lumber district. Later he rented land on the old Robbins ranch in Guernsey, which he devoted to the raising of hogs, sheep and cattle. Subsequently he located west of Delano, Kern county, and there also engaged in stock raising. About thirteen years ago he located on the Dewey ranch, on the Corcoran road about five miles south of Hanford, which his father-in-law had located in an early day. This place comprises one hundred and fifty-seven acres of splendid land, which is devoted to dairying, hogs and alfalfa.

Judge McClellan has long been active in democratic political circles. In 1897, during the administration of Governor James Budd, he served one term as a member of the state legislature, and one term as chair­man of the board of supervisors of Kings county. Later he was elected justice of the peace in Hanford and is now serving his second term in that position. The Judge’s decisions have been characterized by a high sense of justice and his conduct of the office has reflected to his great credit and prestige. Having witnessed the evolution of this region from the primitive conditions of the pioneer days to the splendid development of the present, Judge McClellan’s mind is a rich storehouse of historic events, and he is a very interesting talker on subjects pertaining to those early days. He is a genial and companionable gentleman and none in the community enjoys a greater meed of popular confidence and regard.

Judge McClellan was married to Miss Kate Dewey, who has passed away. She was born in Michigan, but came with her father to California in an early day. To Judge and Mrs. McClellan were born the following children : Ray B., who is engaged in farming in Kings county ; Mrs. Mary Burr ; Mrs. Lois Kern; Mrs. Eunice Chord ; Mildred, who is a clerk in the Bank of Italy in Hanford ; and Donald, who is in charge of the home ranch.

MANUEL ENOS LEWIS, JR.

Among those who have, while conserving their own material affairs, at the same time contributed in a very definite way to the prosperity and welfare of the community with which they are identified, due appre­ciation should be expressed of the life and labors of Manuel Enos Lewis, Jr. He is proprietor of the Lewis Mortuary in Hanford, and has been a lifelong resident of this city, born here on the 10th day of August, 1890, a son of Manuel E. and Mary F. (Sequeira) Lewis, the former a native of Portugal and the latter of Bedford, Massachusetts. M. E. Lewis, Sr., came to Tulare county, California, at the age of eighteen years and, some time afterward engaged in the raising of sheep. Through sound judgment and close attention to business, he was prospered and eventually became one of the largest sheep men in this valley. At one time he ran sheep where Fresno is now located. Several years ago he bought a fruit ranch and there he and his wife now live.

Manuel Enos Lewis, Jr., attended the public schools and after graduat­ing from high school went to work for his father on the home ranch. Later he came to Hanford and went to work in the dry goods department of the Kutner-Goldstein Company, where he was employed for six years. Then for a year he was with the Hanford Mercantile Company, and at the end of that time identified himself with the business to which he was to devote the remainder of his life. Entering the employ of the Peoples Undertaking Company, after one year he took a course in embalming, at the conclusion of which he bought a partnership interest with J. Clarence Rice. Subsequently R. L. Russell bought Mr. Rice’s interest and the partnership of Lewis & Russell was continued for three years, being dissolved on March 27, 1924. Later Mr. Lewis bought the mortuary establishment and has since conducted it under his own name. This mortuary is one of the best equipped in this section of the state, comprising a chapel, a private family room, assembly rooms and display rooms. A modern auto equipment is employed, including ambulance service, and Mr. Lewis employs two assistants and a lady attendant. Courtesy and thoughtful attention to the needs and comfort of his clients have brought to Mr. Lewis a large share of the local business in his line and he has rendered the best of service to the community. Mr. Lewis is deputy coroner of Kings county.

Mr. Lewis was married on January 16, 1915, to Miss Stella Welsh, a native of Madera county, California. She has been a worthy helpmate to her husband, assisting him in many ways in his professional work and contributing greatly to the success of his work. Politically Mr. Lewis is a supporter of the republican party, while fraternally he is affiliated with the Sciots Lodge, the Masons, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Woodmen of the World, the Order of the Eastern Star, the P. F. of U. S. A., the I. D. E. S. and the U. P. E. C. Mr. Lewis is intensely public-spirited in his attitude toward every movement or enterprise affecting the welfare of the community and, because of his business success and his high personal character, he enjoys to a marked degree the esteem of all who know him.

WALTON B. COBB, D.D.S.

If true to his profession and earnest in his efforts to enlarge his sphere of usefulness, the man who spends his life in an effort to alleviate human suffering and distress in any way is indeed a benefactor of his kind, for to such men as Dr. Walton B. Cobb, well known dentist of Lemoore, are entrusted the comfort and safety and in some cases the lives of those who place themselves under his care. Walton B. Cobb was born in Fowler, Fresno county, California, on the 28th day of November, 1887. He attended the grade schools and then entered the high school in Sanger, California, from which he was graduated. Having determined to devote his life to the dental profession, he took the two-year course in the University of California at Berkeley, followed by the full course in dentistry in the University of Southern California, from which he was graduated in 1915, with the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. He immediately came to Lemoore and entered into practice, in which he has been successful to a very gratifying degree. Careful, painstaking and conscientious in everything he does, he has won the confidence and good will of the people of the community and is in the enjoyment of a large and representative patronage. Dr. Cobb has been wisely economical and has invested his money in real estate, being now the owner of three ranches. One, known as the Island ranch, is devoted to alfalfa, while the other two, the Del Rey ranch and the ranch in Fowler, are devoted to vineyards and fruit.

Dr. Cobb was married to Miss Ovilla McHaley, and they are the par­ents of three children : Carol, James and George. Dr. Cobb is a member of the San Joaquin Valley Dental Association. Fraternally he is affiliated With the Knights of Pythias, in the local lodge of which he has held office; the Foresters of America ; the Woodmen of the World ; and the Modern Woodmen of America.

BENN DUFFIELD.

Gaining success and recognition for himself and at the same time honoring his community by notable service, Benn Duffield, city engineer of Hanford, holds worthy prestige among his fellow citizens. He is a native of Pittsfield, Pike county, Illinois, born on the 25th day of March, 1883. He secured a good, practical public school education, and then joined a surveying party as chainman. His first work was on government survey in the Cherokee strip, Oklahoma, where they did retracing work during the summers of 1897-98-99. He then went to the Santa Fe Railroad, in whose machine shops in Newton, Kansas, he was em­ployed for a time. In 1900 he came to California and secured employment with the Risdon Iron Works at San Francisco. Being ambitious for a thorough technical education, during this period he attended the Polytechnic College at Oakland, where he worked his way through by bookkeeping and taking charge of certain night classes. He was graduated in 1911, a civil engineer. He then joined the engineering department of the Sacramento Valley Irrigation Company, for whom he did much general surveying. Later he became engineer for Charles King in the construction of the Hanford & Summit Lake Railroad in Kings county. Upon the completion of that work Mr. Duffield came to Han­ford and opened an office and subsequently did much irrigation and reclamation survey work in this county. He was elected and served one term, from 1915 to 1919, as surveyor of Kings county, and in May, 1915, he became engineer of the Kings county highway commission.

Upon the entry of the United States into the World war, Mr. Duffield obtained a leave of absence from his official duties, and entered the En­gineers Officers Training Camp at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He was commissioned a first lieutenant and assigned to the Fifth Engineers, Regular army, which command was at that time stationed in Texas. The regiment was sent overseas and saw much active service on the western front, principally in the San Mihiel sector. When President Wilson returned on the George Washington from the Peace conference at Paris, Mr. Duffield’s Regiment was appointed one of his escorts. Mr. Duffield received an honorable discharge from the army on March 25, 1919, and at once returned to Hanford. In 1920 he was appointed city engineer and in that capacity has, superintended the construction of many of our paved streets. A notable. accomplishment was his designing and building the Hanford speedway in seventeen days. This is a dirt track and is so carefully constructed that a world’s dirt-track record has been made on it. Mr. Duffield is the owner of a fine forty-acre ranch, which he has planted largely to peaches, grapes and alfalfa.

Mr. Duffield is a member of Hanford Post of the American Legion ; a life member of Hanford Lodge, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks ; a member of Hanford Lodge, F. & A. M.; Hanford Chapter, R. A. M.; Hanford Commandery, K. T.; a life member of Islam Temple, Nobles of the Mystic. Shrine, San Francisco ; member of the American Society of Military Engineers, and of the American Association of Engineers.

Mr. Duffield was married to Miss Dana McCaslin, who was born and reared in Kings county, and who was formerly deputy county clerk. Mr. Duffield’s career presents a notable example of those qualities of mind and character which overcome obstacles and win success. A man of high civic ideals, he gives ardent support to all measures tending to advance the general welfare of the community, and he enjoys to a marked degree the good will and esteem of his fellowmen.

SAMUEL M. BROWN.

The record of Mr. Brown is that of a man who by his own unaided efforts has worked his way from a modest beginning to one of compara­tive prominence in the community where he lives, and as a faithful and competent public official he has won and retains the sincere good will and respect of his fellow citizens. He was born in Kansas, Illinois, on the 18th day of April, 1881. Early in life he was taken by his parents to the state of Oregon, where he secured a good common school education. His first employment was with the Pacific Coast Glass Company of San Francisco, which he entered as an apprentice, and with which concern he remained .for sixteen years. He had completely mastered the mechanical equipment of the plant and later was placed in charge of all machinery. In 1916 Mr. Brown became a special agent for the J. R. Watkins Products, in which capacity he came to Hanford, his territory covering Kings and a part of Tulare and Fresno counties. He continued in that business until April, 1922, when he resigned in order to accept an appointment to the police force of Hanford. He proved an efficient officer and in 1924 was appointed city marshal. This position, equivalent to that of chief of police, is a responsible one, but Mr. Brown has discharged his duties in a manner that has won him popular commendation. In addition to his police duties Mr. Brown is also city tax collector and health officer. Hanford has wisely provided for proper sanitation inspection and has also provided a city health center, with a paid trained nurse. The police force consists of one day man and two night men and this comparatively small force has adequately provided its citizens with protection and maintained good order at all times. It is worthy of note that during his entire active career Mr. Brown has had but three employers.

Mr. Brown was married to Miss Margaret Gillian, a native of Ohio. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Woodmen of the World and the Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorassan.

CARROLL V. BUCKNER.

Among the public-spirited and progressive citizens of Kings county, none is more deserving of public confidence and respect than Carroll V. Buckner, the present mayor of Lemoore. He is a native of Kings county, born in Hanford, on the 25th day of December, 1893. His father, W. V. Buckner, who still resides in this county, was the first sheriff of Kings county and held the office for the unusual period of eighteen years. He was born in Fort Scott, Kansas, came to California in the middle ‘70s and about ten years later located in what is now Kings county, where he followed farming.

Carroll V. Buckner secured his education in the public schools of Han­ford, and when twenty years of age engaged in the garage business in that city. His business plans were interrupted by the entry of the United States into the World war and he enlisted, being sent to the naval aviation station in San Diego, California. After his discharge from the service he located in Lemoore, in March, 1919, and secured the agency for the Hudson and Essex automobiles, in the handling of which he met with gratifying success. In 1922 Mr. Buckner was elected a trustee of the city of Lemoore and two years later the board elected him mayor of the city, of which position he is still the incumbent. Under his ad­ministration the city has made long forward strides in public improve­ments, among which may be mentioned the new city hall, the new high school building, the new American Legion building, a big improvement in the water system, including the laying of new water mains, and the bringing of the fire department up to first-class condition. He firmly believes that the citizens are deserving of the best municipal conditions that can be secured and he is a stanch advocate of constant progress along all legitimate lines of development.

Mr. Buckner was married to Miss Leona Kreyenhagen, of Hanford, and they have a son : Lawrence, aged four years. Mr. Buckner is a mem­ber and past post commander of the American Legion. He is deservedly popular in his community, and the qualities of keen discrimination, sound judgment and executive ability enter very largely into his make-up and have been the contributing elements to his success.

WILLIAM J. HIME.

Among the officials of Kings county, none has had a more commend­able record and none enjoys to a more marked degree the confidence and respect of the community than William J. Hime, sheriff of the county. He is a native of Bedford county, Tennessee, born on the 4th day of October, 1878. He was educated in the common schools and followed farming until 1902, when he came to Hanford. His first employment here was in a fruit-packing plant, but he later went to Fresno county and worked in the coal and oil fields. However, he returned to Hanford and for a time resumed his work in the packing house. He relinquished that work to enter the employ of the Hanford Gas & Power Company as a helper and was successively promoted until he became superintendent of the plant, holding that position until 1916, when he was appointed deputy city marshal of Hanford, being assigned to night duty. At the beginning of 1917 he was appointed city marshal, but resigned in July, 1918, in order to make the race for sheriff. He had two opponents, Lyman Farmer and Frank Blakely, but he was successful in the final election, winning by a majority of nine hundred votes. He took the office on January 1, 1919, and was reelected in 1922. In the last primary he had three worthy opponents—J. C. Griswold, Charles Llewellyn and M. S. Reed—and lacked four hundred votes of having as many as his oppon­ents combined. In the final election he was elected by sixteen hundred and thirty-nine votes. He has so conducted the office of sheriff as to win the heartiest commendation of all who are familiar with his work.

He employs four paid deputies and through his efforts a number of criminals have been captured. The finger-print system has been established and every effort is made to conduct the office in an up-to-date and effective manner.

On October 13, 1903, Mr. Hime was married to Miss Lottie Reeves, a native of Tennessee, and to them have been born three children : Edwina, aged twenty years; and Donald and Delano, twins, aged ten years. Mr. Hime is a splendid example of the virile, progressive, self-made man who believes in doing well whatever is worth doing at all, a man of keen discernment and sound judgment, and because of his industry, right living and faithful performance of duty he stands deservedly high in the esteem of his fellow citizens. Mr. Hime is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen’ of the World and the Knights of Pythias.

G.   T. REINHARD.

The office of biography is not to give voice to a man’s modest esti­mate of himself and his accomplishments, but rather to leave upon the record the verdict establishing his character by the consensus of opinion on the part of his neighbors and fellow citizens. The life of G. T. Reinhard has been one of service, for in two distinct and important lines of effort he has been eminently successful in contributing to the pleasure and desires of the public.

G.   T. Reinhard is a native son of the Keystone state, born in Bath, Pennsylvania, January 3, 1865. He received his elemental education in the public schools, and then, having shown marked talent in music, he became a student in the Bethlehem Musical Seminary, at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. For three years he studied pipe organ under Prof. J. F. Wolle, and became an expert player on this instrument, with which he had been familiar from the age of thirteen years. For many years thereafter he was pipe organist in eastern cities and since coming to California, his active service embracing a period of over thirty-five years. For five years he was organist at the Methodist Episcopal church in Hanford and is now organist for the Masonic lodge and commandery and for the Kiwanis Club. With a profound knowledge of music and a technical mastery of his instrument, he is thoroughly competent and his fine work has given pleasure to thousands who have heard him.

Mr. Reinhard was practically reared to the life of a marble worker. His father owned and operated a granite and marble works in Easton, Bath, Pennsylvania, and his eight sons worked with him, ‘all learning the trade and becoming skilled workmen. These sons have all been successful in life, one becoming a banker, another a government official, another an official of the United States Steel Corporation, and all standing high in their respective communities. G. T. Reinhard remained at home and eventually became his father’s partner in business. Later he went to Wesley, Rhode Island, where he was a runner for the Smith Granite Company, a large company employing four hundred men. Subsequently he became a traveling salesman, with headquarters in Philadelphia, for Tainter & Company, memorial art dealers in New York city, one of the most important concerns of its kind in the United States, employing fifteen traveling salesmen. He sold direct to people of wealth and prominence in eastern Pennsylvania and was very successful, leading the entire force of salesmen in the volume of his business. In 1909 Mr. Reinhard came to California on a six weeks trip and was so delighted with the state that he decided to make his future home here. He first located in Porterville, where for six months he was associated with his brother, H. J. Reinhard, who had preceded him to this state. In 1910 Mr. Reinhard came to Hanford and engaged in business for himself and has had no cause to regret his location here. From a modest beginning he has seen his business steadily grow until today he employs four men and enjoys his full share of public patronage. He produces marble and granite memorials of every character and among the fine monuments he has erected in the Hanford cemetery are those for the following families ; Hefton, Finn, John Rice, Lacey, Ross, Prior and Banium. He uses much eastern and midwestern granite, but specializes in California granite, which is harder and more durable and takes a finer polish than other granites. He has also imported some granite from Aberdeen, Scotland. Good work and courteous service have been the elements that have con­tributed to his success and he is held in the very highest esteem by all who know him.

Mr. Reinhard was married to Miss Anna C. Miller, a native of Pennsylvania, and they have two children : Grace and Stanley. Mr. Reinhard is a Mason, in which order he has taken the Knight Templar degree of the York Rite and the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He is a member of the Hanford Kiwanis Club and takes a deep interest in everything pertaining to the welfare of the community and the advancement of the city along all legitimate lines.

FORREST RILEY.

Forrest Riley, who has during the last dozen years done as much as any other one man to develop the ranch work in Tulare and Kings counties, by improved methods and systematic operations, is a native of Ventura county, California, born on the 22d day of May, 1891, the son of S. A. and Mary (Harper) Riley. He was reared on his father’s farm and secured his educational training in the schools of Fillmore, graduating from the high school. He has been identified with Kings county since 1907 and soon after coming here began the operation of tractors on lake land, much of which he acquired by purchase. In 1913 Mr. Riley branched out in his operations and began to do contract work for ranchers. He did his work so well and so thoroughly that it brought increased business, so that in 1920 he handled twenty thousand acres of land for different large landowners. He now owns three hundred and twenty acres of lake land, on which he keeps one hundred and fifty head of dairy cows and four hundred hogs. He still does contract farming on a large scale, for which he owns plenty of tractors and other heavy farm machinery, and employs from twenty to fifty men, according to the amount of land to be handled.

Mr. Riley was married to Miss Georgia Strong, who was born and reared in Alabama, and three children have been born to them : Hazel, Doris and Mary Frances. He is a Mason, in which order he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite, and also is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine and belongs to the Corcoran Chamber of Commerce.

Mr. Riley’s success since locating here, and his fine personal character, have won him many admirers. Public-spirited and progressive, his in­fluence has been for the general upbuilding of this locality, for he has unswerving faith in its future.

A. F. PATNOTT.

A. F. Patnott enjoys the distinction of having been the pioneer automobile agent in Hanford and he has continued actively and successfully engaged in the line ever since. He has seen a great evolution in the construction of automobiles and has done his full share in popularizing the use of machines for both business and pleasure. He has spent practically his entire life in this section of the state, where he is widely and favorably known. He was born in Visalia, Tulare county, California, on the 18th day of November, 1878, a son of John J. and Eliza (Lisman) Patnott, both of whom were natives of Missouri. John J. Patnott came to California in the early ‘70s as an engineer on the Southern Pacific Railroad, a position which he held for many years. Of the children born to him and his wife, the following are living: Roy J. and Elmer, both of whom live in Richmond, California ; and A. F., of this review.

A. F. Patnott was educated in the public schools of Visalia, and in 1895, when but seventeen years of age, engaged in the bicycle business in Hanford, as a member of the firm of Walcott, Wall & Patnott. Later Mr. Patnott bought his partners’ interests and thereafter conducted the business alone. In 1903 he took the local agency for the Pope-Hartford automobile, being the first man to engage in the automobile business here. In his two stores, in Visalia and Hanford, he had been handling the Pope-Hartford bicycle and had earned a fine reputation in business circles for his energetic business methods and his square dealing. During the subsequent years he has enjoyed his full share of the local business in his line. In 1914 he became the agent for Kings county for the Cadillac car and in 1916 took the agency for Kings and Tulare counties and the Coalinga district of Fresno county for the Oakland car.

Mr. Patnott was married to Miss Estella Follett, who has passed away. They became parents of three children : Fern, Doris and Rondall.

GEORGE A. WEISHAR.

Among the citizens of Kings county who have contributed in a defi­nite way to the public service and who have, because of their faithfulness and attention to duty, won the approbation and regard of their fellowmen, none stands higher in popular esteem than George A. Weishar, the pres­ent postmaster of Hanford. He is a native of this district and has spent his entire life here. He was born on the 22d day of June, 1875, in Visalia, Tulare county, a son of August and Clementine (Downing) Weishar, who are highly respected residents of that place. August Weishar was a native of Germany, who came to this country early in life, soon got in touch with the spirit of our national life and during the Civil war served in defense of his adopted country. He came to California in an early day and became a successful building contractor in Visalia, erecting many of the most im­portant structures in that city. His wife is a native of Missouri.

George A. Weishar secured his educational training in the public schools of Visalia and on March 4, 1892, he entered the post office in Visalia as a clerk. From that time to the present, thirty-three years, he has served continuously in this branch of public service, a record probably not equaled in the state of California. In Visalia he served nine years as assistant postmaster under Postmasters H. W. Dean, L. V. Nanscowen and M. J. Burns. About twenty-five years ago he was transferred to the Hanford post office and here served in a similar capacity under Post­masters Frank Hickman, W. A. Long and F. V. Dewey. In 1922 he was appointed postmaster and is giving the same conscientious and faithful service that has characterized his third of a century of work in this department. Painstaking and accommodating, Mr. Weishar has so directed the affairs of his office as to make it serve as far as possible the needs and convenience of the patrons of the office, a fact which is duly appreciated by all familiar with the conduct of the office.

Fraternally Mr. Weishar is a Mason, a Knight of Pythias, belongs to the Woodmen of the World, the Order of the Eastern Star, the Pythian Sisters and the Sons of Veterans. Personally Mr. Weishar is genial kindly in his relations with his fellowmen and gives his unreserved support to every movement for the advancement of the community welfare. The substantial qualities of his character and his long career as a faithful public servant have won for him the goodwill and esteem of all who know

Mr. Weishar was married in San Francisco on January 1, 1901, to him. Lulu E. Magee, by whom he had one child, Genevieve, who is now a student in the University of California, at Berkeley. Mr. Weishar was married on July 31, 1921, to Daisy L. Hegadorn, of Hanford, who was the widow of Wallace Hegadorn and daughter of Mrs. S. E. Lovelace, a pioneer of this county. Mrs. Weishar was the mother of one child, Jane E.

FRANK B. GRAVES.

Among the members of the legal profession in Kings county, none stands higher in public esteem than Frank B. Graves, well known law­yer and the present city attorney of Hanford. He was born in Spottsylvania county, Virginia, on the 16th day of January, 1881, the scion of a historic old southern colonial family. He is essentially a self-made man, for the family, finances were at such a low ebb that at the age of fourteen years he was compelled to go to work. Determined to secure an education, however, he pursued his studies at night whenever possible and eventually realized his ambition. His first employment was in a shoe factory in Alexandria, Virginia, but later he secured clerical work in Washing­ton, D. C., where he was enabled to attend high school. He was ambitious to devote his life to the practice of law and to this end he entered Georgetown University, where he took the pre-law course and then attended the Law School of that university for two years. Relinquishing the study of law for a time, he moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he secured a position, first as an assistant manager and then as a manager of the millinery department in the Gimble Brothers department store. In 1898, upon the declaration of war with Spain, Mr. Graves enlisted in Company C of the Fourth Regiment, Virginia Volunteer Infantry, with which he saw nine months of service.

On July 25, 1908, Mr. Graves arrived in Los Angeles, California, but soon afterward went to San Francisco, where he secured employment in the Emporium department store and, later, in the Newman-Levison Company store. During this period he was again devoting himself to the study of law and entered the Kent Law School in San Francisco, where he completed the three-year course in fourteen months. He was graduated in 1911 and was admitted to the bar on March 11th of that year. He entered upon the practice of his profession in San Francisco, but in May, 1912, he came to Lemoore, Kings county, where he remained until 1917, when he located in Hanford. He here became at once closely identified with the varied interests of the locality and his public spirit and progressive attitude won him the respect and good will of the community. He soon found himself in the enjoyment of a large clientele and during the intervening years he has occupied. a prominent place in his profession, having been identified as counsel with much of the important litigation in the county courts. At present hp is rendering efficient service as city attorney of Hanford. Mr. Graves is deeply interested in edu­cational affairs and is a member of the board of trustees of the grammar school.

Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic lodge, of which he is a past worshipful master ; of the Knights of Pythias, of which he is a past chancellor ; of the Order of the Eastern Star, of which he is a past worthy patron ; and he was also a member of the board of directors of the Hanford Board of Trade. During the World war Mr. Graves took an active part in the Liberty Loan drives and rendered effective service as county chairman of the Four-Minute men.

Mr. Graves was married on November 20, 1902, in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania, to Miss Florence A. Harper, a native of Pennsylvania, and to them have been born three children, Kathryn, Richard P., and Carol Eleanor. Mrs. Graves was also active in her support of the war cause, having served as food administrator of the county. In politics they are republicans, and belong to the Presbyterian church. In 1925 Mr. Graves was appointed state quartermaster of the Department of California, United Spanish War Veterans.

CHARLES KING.

Probably no one man has in a more marked degree stamped the im­press of his strong individuality upon the community than has Charles King, whose efforts to develop this section and open it up for settlement have been rewarded with most gratifying results. The qualities which have made him prominent and successful have also brought him the esteem of his fellowmen, for his career has been one of well-directed energy, strong determination and honorable methods.

Charles King is a native of the state of Tennessee born August 2, 1855. He was educated in the private schools and was reared to the life of a farmer, which vocation he followed until 1888, when he came to Hanford. Here he engaged in the buying and selling of live stock for two years, but in 1890 established the first fruit-packing house in this section of the state. Progressive and enterprising in his methods, he has never hesitated to pioneer in any line if his judgment told him it was the right thing to do. In 1900 he disposed of his packing-house interests and entered the real estate field. In this work he also showed his initiative, for instead of merely buying and selling at a nominal profit for handling, he improved the land before offering it to the public, and thus made it more attractive and more nearly insured a permanent settler. He handled large tracts, and many of them, so that his work was a vital factor in the settlement of the San Joaquin valley. He platted many divisions and did a great deal of colonization work, being recognized as one of the largest land developers in the district.

As an instance of Mr. King’s methods, in 1910 he took up a large tract of land in Fresno county, then went before the state legislature and had that land annexed to Kings county. He at once opened up this land to settlement and in order to insure an outlet for the farm products he built and operated the Hanford & Summit Lake Railroad, fifty-two miles long. The result was a quick sale of the land. In 1917 he built what is known as King’s Lake Shore Railroad, twenty miles long, on the shores of Tulare lake, southwest of Corcoran. This road connects with the Santa Fe Railroad and is largely used as a freight line and to haul out the grain produced in the Tulare lake district. Thus Mr. King has not only advanced his individual interests, but he has contributed to an incalculable degree to the convenience and prosperity of the people of his district. He is essentially public-spirited and withholds his support from no movement calculated to advance the welfare of the community. He is president of the First National Bank of Hardwick.

Mr. King was first married in Tennessee on December 23, 1872, to Mary J. Biddle, by whom he had one son, Aubrey V., now of Los Angeles, a speculator. The wife and mother died here in 1889. Mr. King was married in June, 1892, at Los Banos, to Emma F. Parker, a native of Illinois. He belongs to the Presbyterian church and politically is a demo­crat. Fraternally Mr. King is a member of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

G.   BARRE PHIPPS.

Among those who have, by their upright lives and appreciated service to the public along the line of their professions; gained the confidence and respect of their fellow citizens, specific mention should be made of G. Barre Phipps, who conducts an up-to-date undertaking establishment in Lemoore. He was born in Port Dover, Ontario, Canada, on the 29th day of November, 1879, and received his educational training in the public schools of his native town. In 1896, at the age of seventeen years, he came to Kings county and for a time was employed on ranches in this vicinity. Later he engaged in farming on his own account near Stringtown, but subsequently was variously employed until 1913, when he started to learn the undertaking business with Clarence Rice, in Hanford. Eventually he formed a partnership with Mr. Rice, under the firm name of Rice & Phipps, in Lemoore. The business was successful and three years later Mr. Phipps purchased his partner’s interest and has since conducted the business alone. He has, by his courteous manner and efforts to meet the wants of his patrons, made a good impression on the community and has handled his full share of the local business in his line. Tactful, kind and painstaking in a profession where such elements are fully appreciated, he has been generally commended by those who have had dealings with him.

Mr. Phipps was married in December, 1902, to Miss Lena Beaver, who was born and reared in Salinas, Monterey county, California, and they are the parents of three children : Glenn, Spencer and Marjorie.

On February 23, 1918, Mr. Phipps was made an American citizen and on that same date he was appointed deputy county coroner, which position he still fills. He has taken an active interest in local affairs and is a member of the Lemoore Commercial Club and the Chamber of Commerce. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being a past noble grand of the Lemoore Lodge, and is also secretary of the Odd Fellows Hall Association. He belongs to the Masonic lodge in Lemoore and to the Knights of Pythias in Hanford.

JOHN H. McGLASHAN.

Among the enterprising and progressive business men who have con­tributed by their efforts to the upbuilding and development of Lemoore should be included John H. McGlashan, for he has been a constant and consistent booster for Lemoore and the surrounding district. He was born on his father’s farm, about two miles south of Lemoore, on the 23d day of April, 1880, the son of Andrew and Emma F. (Beaver) McGlashan, the former of whom was a native of New York state and the latter of California. Andrew McGlashan came to California by way of the Isthmus of Panama, in 1864, locating in Merced county, on the west side of the valley. In 1879 he came to Tulare county and here devoted his attention to active farming operations for many years. He served as roadmaster of the district in the ‘90s. He died April 28, 1925, at the age of eighty-one years. To him and his wife were born the following children : Alexander, Mrs. Mabel Friend, John H., Robert, Mrs. Helen Maschmyer, Clyde and Charles.

John McGlashan received his education in the public schools of Le­moore and his youthful days were spent in work on his father’s farm. He then went to the Coalinga oil field, where he spent five years. Re­turning then to Lemoore, he entered into a partnership with his brother Alexander and engaged in the meat business in Lemoore under the firm name of McGlashan Brothers. They also have a slaughter-house and kill and prepare all of their own meat. Because of their courtesy and accommodation they have built up a large and constantly increasing business. McGlashan Brothers also own a cattle ranch on the east -side of the valley on which they run one thousand head.

On June 20, 1906, Mr. McGlashan was married to Miss Lelia McCormick, a native of Missouri, and they have two children : Marjorie Dale and Mabel Lucile. Mr. McGlashan has taken an active part in local public affairs and has served for ten years as a member of the grammar school board, of which he is, now president. In 1924 he was president of the Lemoore Chamber of Commerce and in every way possible has advertised the advantages of Lemoore. He is a member of the Masonic order, in which he has taken all the degrees of the York Rite, also a member of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

FRANK GRIFFITH, V. S.

The importance of a business or profession is in a very large measure determined by its beneficence or usefulness. As a live stock inspector for many years, Frank Griffith has performed a very notable service for his fellow citizens and the character of his work has been such as to win the commendation of all who know him. As a veterinary, Dr. Griffith is skilled and conscientious, and has long stood among the leaders of his profession in this section of the state. He was born about twelve miles north of Merced, Merced county, California, on the 4th day of October, 1850, the son of Dr. Joshua and Frances (Aries) Griffith. Joshua Griffith, who was an easterner by nativity, was a pioneer of California, coming by the way of Mexico, and as early as 1848 was engaged in placer mining in Mariposa county. Later he engaged in farming and built the first flouring mill in the San Joaquin valley. While in Mercer county, in which he finally located, he resumed the practice of medicine, which profession he had followed before coming west, and he gained a high place in the confidence and esteem of his fellowmen. When he first settled there his land was under the control of Mexico, but on the 9th of September, 1850, he received a grant for the land where his home stood and this remained in the family until about fifteen years ago, when it was sold.

Frank Griffith received such educational training as was possible in the primitive schools of those early days here. He attended the old Snelling school, in Merced county, but did not allow himself to be bound by his meager opportunity there, for he persisted in his search for knowledge by reading and studying everything he could get hold of. He spent his youthful days on the farm and was thrown much with live stock, where he probably received his first inspiration for that branch of science in which he has specialized since. Not having the chance to go to a technical school, he studied privately, and under his father’s direction, and eventually appeared before the state veterinary board for examination and was granted a certificate in 1901. In 1870 Dr. Griffith came to Hanford, remaining but a short time, but in 1871 he came again. Some time later, in 1875, he went to Grayeville and opened a meat market, from which he furnished meat for the construction gangs who were engaged in the building of the railroad through this section. From there Dr. Griffith went to Lemoore, where he served as constable. During this period the Doctor was also practicing his profession and was gaining not only splendid experience, but was also acquiring a repu­tation as a careful and successful veterinarian. From Lemoore he went to Visalia, where he remained four years, serving as deputy sheriff, after which he spent six years in Santa Cruz. In 1891 Dr. Griffith came to Hanford and has since made this his home. It is a notable coincidence that in each place he has lived he has served as live stock inspector and since 1894 has served in that position continuously in Kings county. A man of many fine qualities of character, he has shown a public-spirited attitude toward all movements for the betterment of the community along material, civic or moral lines, and stands high in the regard and esteem of his fellow citizens. The doctor owns a valuable ranch adjoin­ing Hanford, also other agricultural land in Kings county.

Dr. Griffith was married in San Francisco, to Miss Harriet A. Moore, the daughter of J. D. Moore, a native of Ohio, and a pioneer of Nevada. Politically, Dr. Griffith has always given his support to the republican party and at one time served as deputy United States marshal. He is deeply interested in the history of this locality and has a fine collection of Indian relics, embracing some very rare specimens.

JOSEPH I. BARBEIRO.

Throughout an active and interesting career duty has ever been the motive of action of Joseph I. Barbeiro, of Hanford, and it is a compliment worthily bestowed to say that this community is honored in his citizenship. In the best sense of the term he is a self-made man and his upright and industrious life has won for him the respect and good­will of his fellow citizens. He is a native of the Azores Islands, born on the 19th day of November, 1862, the son of Joseph I. and Polcena Barbeiro, farming folk, who never left their native land, the mother dying there in 1891 and the father in 1897.

Joseph I. Barbeiro received his educational training in the public schools of the Azores and, at the age of sixteen years, decided to emigrate to the United States, realizing that his native land offered but little hope for advancement. He arrived in this country practically without funds, ignorant of the language and customs of the country, but well fortified with courage, ambition, a sound body and a willingness to work. He first went to Solano county, California, where for six months he was employed on a farm. During the ensuing fourteen years he waked 4a mines in California and Oregon, and then, from 1882 to 1884, was em­ployed in railroad tunnel work. In 1890 Mr. Barbeiro went to San Fran­cisco, where he met a friend who induced him to go to New York city, and there he obtained employment as clerk in a hotel. Three months later he started west again, stopping in Leadville, Colorado, where he worked in the mines for two years. In 1893 he went into the mercantile business in San Leandro, in which he met with fair success, and sold the business in 1904 at a nice profit. During the following three years he was employed as a traveling salesman, and in 1907 came to Hanford and went into business in partnership with A. J. Perry. This claimed his attention for a number of years, but eventually he sold his interest and has since lived retired. In 1909 Mr. Barbeiro bought a fine ranch near Hanford and this he now rents on shares. In all these varied experiences Mr. Barbeiro showed himself a man of sound. common sense and good judgment and the success which finally crowned his efforts is richly deserved. He is one of the best known and most influential among the Portuguese population of this section of the state, enjoying to a notable degree the confidence and goodwill of his fellow citizens.

Mr. Barbeiro was married to Miss Rose Madira, a member of a prominent old pioneer family of California, her father living to the ad­vanced age of eighty-six years. To Mr. and Mrs. Barbeiro have been born three children, namely : John J., who enlisted in the United States navy at the age of sixteen years and saw sixteen months of active service ; Polsena ; and Clarence. Politically Mr. Barbeiro has always given his support to the republican party and while residing in San Leandro he served four years as city trustee. Fraternally, he is a Mason, in which order he has taken the Royal Arch degree. He is also a member of the U. P. E. C.

WILLIAM J. AHERN.

Among the enterprising and successful business men of Corcoran, none has to a greater degree merited the fine success which has crowned his efforts here than Mr. William J. Ahern, who is a partner in the Ford agency and service garage. He was born in the city of San Francisco, on the 12th day of April, 1884, the son of Timothy and Johanna (Dore) Ahern. These parents were both natives of Ireland, but came to San Francisco in their youth and were here married.

William J. Ahern attended the public schools, supplementing this by a course in a business college, and then was employed for eleven years as a clerk in hardware stores in San Francisco. He then joined the Ford force there and was employed for three years, one year in the assembling plant and two years on the road, checking up sales and service among the coast agencies. In 1919 Mr. Ahern came to Corcoran and established a garage, which has been a successful venture from the beginning, the Ford Agency and Service, which was established here in 1914, being the business acquired upon his coming here. In 1922 he took in as a partner H. W. B. Church and the two make a strong and enterprising firm. Prompt service and reliable work has been their motto and has resulted in bringing to them a large share of the local custom in their line. Besides the two partners, there are nine employes in the garage.

Mr. Ahern was married to Miss Margaret Powers of San Francisco. Mr. Ahern is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Columbus. He was formerly a vice president and director of the Chamber of Commerce and is now a member of the industrial committee of that organization. Tireless energy, keen perception, honesty of purpose, and a genius for doing the right thing at the right time, are the chief characteristics of the man. Because of his success and his high character, he is eminently deserving of the splendid position which he holds in the regard of his fellow citizens.

ARTHUR D. CAMPBELL.

In these days of large commercial transactions, when credits are a large factor in the daily round of business, the province of the banker is wide and important. The banks of Kings county have been the back­bone of our commercial prosperity and among those who have been actively identified with financial affairs in this district specific mention should be made of Arthur D. Campbell, the efficient and popular cashier of the First National Bank of Lemoore. He is a native of the city now honored by his citizenship, born on the 27th day of October, 1888, a son of D. P. and Verna (Brown) Campbell, the former a native of Missouri and the latter of West Virginia. D. P. Campbell came to Lemoore in 1886 and here followed his trade of carpenter for a time, later becoming foreman of Nathan Brothers’ warehouse. He is now deceased.

Arthur Campbell acquired his education in the public schools of Le­moore, graduating from the high school. In 1909 he entered the Bank of Lemoore as a clerk, was later promoted to the position of assistant cashier and eventually was made cashier. In 1922, upon the consolidation of the Bank of Lemoore with the First National Bank, under the latter name, he was chosen cashier of the merged institution. Closely in touch with local commercial affairs and exercising a wise discrimination in the hand­ling of the funds of the bank, he has been a valuable asset not only to the stockholders of the bank, but to the business interests of the community. Mr. Campbell is a man of action rather than words and is universally recognized as a splendid citizen, reliable and trustworthy, who has the best interests of his fellowmen at heart.

Mr. Campbell married Miss Margaret Thomayer, a native of this state. He is a constant and consistent booster for Lemoore and has contributed in every way within his power to promote the welfare of his city along all normal lines. He is president of the Lemoore Chamber of Commerce and is treasurer of the municipality ; is a member of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks ; and of the Kiwanis Club of Hanford. He is the owner of a splendid ranch, equipped with modern improvements, and from the operation of which he derives considerable pleasure.

JOSEPH M. CLEMENTE.

Joseph M. Clemente is another conspicuous example of what a man, coming to a strange country and handicapped by ignorance of the lan­guage and of the customs of the country, may accomplish through the exercise of sound judgment and indefatigable industry. He is the owner of a fine fruit farm near Hanford, and was born in the Azores Islands, on the 7th day of February, 1889, a son of M. M. and Laura (Rodreques) Clemente, the latter of whom passed away on January 14, 1925. The father who still lives in his native land, has followed farming all his life. Joseph M. Clemente acquired his education in the public schools and remained at home with his parents until he had attained the age of twenty-one years, when he came to the United States, locating at once in Kings county. Three months after coming here he engaged in the dairy business in Goshen, to which he devoted his attention for eight years. At the end of that time he came to Hanford and bought his present farm of one hundred and sixty acres, of which twenty acres are in orchard and fifteen acres in vineyard. He has devoted himself untiringly to the further development of this place, which is now considered one of the best rural properties in this section of the country. Mr. Clemente’s success is all the more noteworthy considering the fact that he came here a poor man and entirely ignorant of our language. But he was de­termined to win success and that he has done so is apparent to anyone who passes his fine home and surrounding property. He is a firm sup­porter of the institutions of his adopted country and stands high in the esteem of his fellow citizens.

Mr. Clemente was married to Miss Mary V. Clement, and they are popular members of the social circles in which they move. Mr. Clemente is a republican politically and has fraternal affiliations with the Knights of Columbus, the Woodmen of the World, the I. D. E. S. and the U. P. E. C.

WILLIAM M. GOODALL.

In all that constitutes true manhood and good citizenship William M. Goodall, owner of Goodall’s Garage in Hanford, is a notable example and none stands higher than he in the esteem and confidence of the com­munity honored by his citizenship. He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 29th day of June, 1870, the son of George E. and Sarah Jane (Franklin) Goodall, both of whom are deceased. George E. Goodall, who was a stonecutter by trade, enlisted for service in the Civil war and fought in an Ohio regiment throughout that great struggle.

William M. Goodall received a good education in the public schools of Cincinnati and after graduating from the high school took a business Course in the Cincinnati Commercial College. He then learned the trade of lithographing, which he followed until 1904. In 1889 he came to California, locating first in Bakersfield, then going to Taft, of which he was one of the pioneer settlers. In February, 1914, Mr. Goodall came to Hanford, where he has since remained. While in Taft he had taken up automobile repair work and in Bakersfield he had served nine years as deputy city marshal. When he came to Hanford he at once engaged in the automobile business and for eight years has been in business on his own account. He does repairing and also stores cars. He gives employ­ment to four men and has been successful to a gratifying degree.

Mr. Goodall married Miss Edith Hodge of Tennessee. In 1896 Mr. Goodall laid aside civic duties and enlisted in the United States army, being assigned to the cavalry, with which he saw active service in Cuba, the Philippines and China. He was chief trumpeter of the Sixth United States Cavalry Regiment and was in the service five years. He is a republican in his political views, and is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles, in the latter of which he has been honored by election to the office of state conductor. Mr. Goodall is considered one of the finest penmen in the state of California and is deservedly proud of his accomplishment in this line.

ARTHUR W. REYNOLDS.

The history of Kings county would be incomplete and unsatisfactory without personal mention of those whose activities have been closely interwoven with the growth and prosperity of this locality. Among this representative class of citizens stands Arthur W. Reynolds, who for twenty- two years has been identified with the Hanford Gas Company, and who is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, born on the 24th day of May, 1862.

Arthur W. Reynolds secured a good practical education in the public schools of that city and during all his business career he has been connected with illuminating and fuel gas service. His first employment was with the Goodwin Gas Stove & Meter Company of Philadelphia. Later he went to St. Paul, Minnesota, where for twenty years he was in the employ of the St. Paul Gas & Light Company, holding the position of superintendent of distribution during the greater part of that time. In 1901 Mr. Reynolds began working for the Fresno Gas Company in Fresno, California, and two years later came to Hanford and entered the employ of the Hanford Gas Company, which was at that time constructing and installing its system here. From a small beginning the business of this company has steadily increased, until now it has fourteen hundred consumers. Mr. Reynolds has been the efficient and courteous secretary of this company and has won the commendation of all who know him.

Aside from his duties with the gas company Mr. Reynolds has main­tained close identification with the varied interests of the district in which he lives and is a member of the boards of directors of the Guaranty Land & Investment Company, the Buena Vista Land & Investment Company and the Water Belt Farms Company. He is the owner of a seventy-acre cotton ranch, finely situated one mile south of Corcoran, this county.

Mr. Reynolds was married to Miss Annie Martin and they are the parents of three children : Edith, Mabel and Howard. Fraternally Mr. Reynolds is a member of Hanford Lodge No. 66, Knights of Pythias, and the Modern Woodmen of America.

JOSEPH P. LEMON.

Joseph P. Lemon, ranch owner and public-Spirited citizen of Hanford, may justly bear the title of self-made man, having worked his way un­aided from a modest beginning to an admirable and influential position among the successful business men of Kings county. He is a native of the Azore Islands, born in April, 1878, and reared and educated in his native land. He has fought life’s battles unaided since his seventeenth year, for it was then that he came to the United States. He arrived in Kings county in March, 1893, just prior to the formation of the county, which occurred on May 23d of that year, and, having remained here con­tinuously since, he has witnessed and participated in the wonderful transformation which has taken place here during the subsequent years. For a short time after coming here he was employed on ranches, and then secured employment in the shoe store of Mr. Rubenstein, in Hanford. Later he opened a men’s shoe store and repair shop in Hanford, which he disposed of and then engaged in the grocery business. He was successful, but was ambitious for a larger field of operations and, in partnership with three other men, he went into the sheep business. The business prospered and before long Mr. Lemon bought the interests of his partners, since which time he has been independent in his enterprises. By careful and painstaking attention to his business, he has been successful and has gradually enlarged his holdings until today he is numbered among the largest sheep raisers of Kings county. He now runs from three thousand to four thousand sheep and this one phase of his activities has proven him to be a man of sound judgment and wise discrimina­tion.

Mr. Lemon is the owner of a one hundred and sixty acre ranch one mile north of Lemoore, which he maintains under a high state of cul­tivation—twenty acres being in apricots, sixteen acres in vineyard and the balance in alfalfa. He maintains an eighty-cow dairy and the farm contains all modern improvements and conveniences. He also has seven hundred and twenty acres in another ranch south of Lemoore, which contains a one-hundred-cow dairy, and on which are one hundred and fifty head of dry dairy stock, thirty head of horses, two hundred head of hogs and nine hundred sheep. A large part of this land is sown to alfalfa. In Kern county Mr. Lemon owns thirteen hundred and twenty acres of grazing land; has fourteen hundred acres of grazing land on the west side, in Kings county ; and has fourteen sections of rented land in Kern county

When only twenty-four years of age Mr. Lemon was sheep inspector for the county, having had sheep of his own since he was eighteen years old.

During the prevalence of the foot-and-mouth disease in this state in 1924, Mr. Lemon was appointed a member of the advisory board and took an active part in the efforts to control and stamp out the ravages of the disease. He is an active member of the California Woolgrowers Association, and is a director at large of the Kings County Farm Bureau. He was for three years president of the dairy department of the Farm Bureau and is now a director. He is also a stockholder and member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Hanford.

Mr. Lemon has always taken a deep interest in the improvement of Hanford, and especially has striven to secure wide and well improved streets. As an instance of his far-sightedness, on the south side, between Irwin and Redington streets, there was an alley, twenty-eight feet wide, with but three houses on it. Mr. Lemon advocated the widening and improving of this street, but there was considerable opposition and he was three years in getting approval to the project. To show his earnestness in the matter, he donated five hundred and thirty-five dollars to the city to help defray the cost of the improvement. This thoroughfare is now known as Lacey boulevard, in honor of a pioneer citizen of Hanford. The name was selected by Mr. Lemon and adopted by the board of supervisors and city board of trustees. Mr. Lemon was also instrumental in having a narrow street between Redington and Kaweah streets widened.

Politically Mr. Lemon assumes a somewhat independent attitude, voting for the candidate for office whom he deems best fitted, but he is a Republican in national affairs. He is a member of the Portuguese-American Club and of the Portuguese lodges, I. D. E. S. and U. P. E. C.

Mr. Lemon was married November 10, 1902, to Miss May Ramos; who was born and reared in Sonoma county, California, and they have a son : Louis, twenty-one years of age, who is now taking the law course in the University of Oregon. The success attained by Mr. Lemon in his business enterprises has been due solely to his steady persistence, stern integrity and excellent judgment, qualities which have given him rank with the leading business men in his section of the state, besides winning for him the confidence and esteem of the public to a marked degree. His religious faith is that of the Catholic church.

RICHARD F. SILVEIRA.

The life of Richard F. Silveira, proprietor of the Farmers Hardware & Implement Company of Hanford, has been such as to elicit praise from those who know him best, owing to the fact that he has been upright in his dealings with his fellowmen, at the same time lending his support to the advancement of any cause looking to the welfare of the community at large. He is a native of the Azores Islands, born on the 8th day of November, 1897, a son of M. F. and Agada Silveira, both of whom are now deceased. The father came to California in 1860 and here spent the major portion of his life from that time on, though he frequently returned to his native land.

Richard F. Silveira attended the public schools of his native land, but his educational training there was comparatively brief, as at the age of thirteen years he came to the United States. Locating in Kings county, he took the best possible course by which to learn the English language, becoming a student in the public schools here. During these student days he put in his spare time at any work he could find to do, most of his employment being in connection with ranching and dairies. When eighteen years of age he took a position in a store in Lemoore, where he remained one year. In 1917 he enlisted in the United States army and was assigned to the Coast Artillery. He was sent overseas and saw six months hard service in France. At the end of seventeen months service he received an honorable discharge and returned to Hanford. During the following few years he was in the employ of the Hanford Produce Company, but on April 1, 1924, in company with his brother Antony, he bought the business which he now conducts. They carry a full line of shelf and heavy hardware, farm implements, paints, automobile tires, gas engines and pumping machinery. They make a specialty of installing pumps and the business has steadily grown until now six men are em­ployed to handle it. Mr. Silveira has devoted himself indefatigably to the business and by his honorable methods has won a prosperity which is richly merited.

Mr. Silveira was married to Miss Rose Louis, a native of California, and they have one child, Betty May. Mr. Silveira owes allegiance to no political party, but casts his vote for the men who in his judgment are best fitted for public office. Fraternally he is a member of the Woodmen of the World, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the American Legion and the U. P. E. C.

JOHN G. COVERT.

John G. Covert, whose law office is in the old bank building, is the scion of one of the pioneer families of this section of the state, his par­ents having come across the plains by ox team and located in San Joaquin county in 1859. He was born in Stanislaus county, California, on the 10th day of November, 1866, a son of William A. and Fannie (Doherty) Covert, the former of whom was a native of Indiana, while his wife was born in Ireland. The father passed away in 1912 and is survived by his widow, who is now eighty-seven years of age. They were the parents of three children, namely: Mrs. Ida V. Murphy of Stanislaus county; John G., the immediate subject of this review; and Robert F., of San Francisco. William A. and Fannie Covert came separately to this state and were married in Stockton. Their first home in the San Joaquin valley was on a ranch about eight miles northwest of Modesto, in Stanislaus county.

John G. Covert attended the public schools in Stanislaus and Tulare counties, and then studied successively in St. Mary’s College at Stockton, Santa Clara University, and finally, having determined to devote his life to the practice of law, he entered the Hastings Law School, at San Francisco, and was admitted to the bar in May, 1894. He immediately came to Hanford and entered upon the active practice of his profession. During the period from 1906 to 1913 he served as judge of the superior court of Kings county. Judge Covert has taken an active part in advancing the interests of the community in many ways.

Judge Covert was married to Miss Rebecca Davis, a native of South Carolina, and to them has been born a son : Robert F., now twenty-seven years of age and a ranch owner in this county. Fraternally Judge Covert is a member of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, of which he is a past exalted ruler ; and also belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men and the Knights of Columbus.

JOHN R. SILVA.

Among the citizens of Kings county who have by their upright con­duct and high personal character won the respect and esteem of their fellow citizens, stands John R. Silva, who occupies the responsible posi­tion of head janitor for the three grammar schools of Hanford. He was born on the Azore Islands on the 5th day of October, 1873, a son of John R. and Eugenia C. Silva. His father, who is now deceased, was a man of some prominence in his native land, holding the position of superintendent of streets.

John R. Silva was educated in the schools of his native land. He remained under the parental roof until nineteen years of age, when he came to the United States. He first located in New Hampshire, where he resided for eight months, and then lived in several other states, spending eighteen years in the state of Vermont. During that period he made two trips back to the Azores. In 1909 Mr. Silva came to Hanford and for two years was employed in ranch work. He then engaged in mercantile pursuits, which he conducted for six years and then, selling out, returned to work on a ranch. For the. past seven years he has been employed by the city of Hanford, supervising the janitor work for the grammar schools. Painstaking and conscientious in his work, he has so performed his duties as to win the commendation of the school authori­ties, while his courtesy and accommodation have won for him many warm friends.

Mr. Silva was married to Miss Rose Pedroze, also a native of the Azores, and they have two children : Amily and Mary. Politically Mr. Silva is a strong supporter of the republican party, and is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Druids, the I. D. E. S. and the U. P. E. C.

JOSEPH A. LEWIS.

The gentleman to a brief review of whose -life and characteristics the following lines are devoted, has spent his entire life in the district in which he now lives and has so ordered his actions as to win the confidence and goodwill of his fellow citizens. An honorable service during the World war and energetic and progressive business methods have given him an enviable standing in his community and he is entitled to specific mention in the history of his county. Joseph A. Lewis, who is successfully engaged in the automobile business in Hanford, was born in Huron, Fresno county, California, on the 16th day of August, 1893, the son of Manuel Lewis, a native of the Azores Islands, who has been an honored resident of California for over forty years. In the early days of his residence here he engaged in sheep raising, but is now a successful fruit- grower near Hanford.

Joseph A. Lewis acquired his education in the Kings river and Ex­celsior school districts, and at the age of fourteen years began working as an automobile mechanic in the Imperial Garage in Hanford. From 1915 to 1917 he was employed in the Buckner Garage, and in the latter year enlisted in the United States army. He was assigned to the aviation service and was sent to the aviation field at San Antonio, Texas.

Here, after training, he was made a first-class sergeant and was trans­ferred to the Wilbur Wright Aviation Field at Dayton, Ohio, where he took an active part in the construction and arrangement of the new field. Later he was transferred to the field in Minneapolis, Minnesota, as in­structor in aviation, remaining there until there was no longer need for his service, when he was sent to The Presidio, at San Francisco, and received his discharge on January 12, 1919. Mr. Lewis then returned to Hanford and was employed in the Hanford Garage until January 1, 1920, when he took the local agency for the Willys-Knight and Overland automobiles, in the handling of which he has been very successful. He formed a partnership with Louis Anmell and they have proven a strong concern, holding a high position among the business firms of this city. Mr. Lewis is a genial, approachable and accommodating man, with whom it is a pleasure to transact business, and he is eminently deserving of the marked popularity which he enjoys. He is a member of the American Legion and the Improved Order of Red Men.

JACK FILIPPI.

One of the successful business men and well known citizens of Han­ford is Jack Filippi, who conducts a prosperous grocery business. He has succeeded because he has been persistent and energetic and, above all, honorable in his dealings with the public, and he has therefore en­joyed the confidence and goodwill of all who have had dealings with him. He is a native of sunny Italy, born August 31, 1895, the son of John and Madaline Filippi, who came to the United States when their son was but a babe. Coming to Kings county, John Filippi engaged in farming, which calling he prosecuted vigorously and with success up to the time of his retirement from active business. He and his wife are both living and enjoying the rest which they have so richly earned.

Jack Filippi attended the public schools of Hanford, but while yet a boy went to work in the packing houses, being employed at making boxes. After a number of years at this work he learned the machinist’s trade, at which he was employed for six years. On January 1, 1921, he established his present business, starting in a small way, but gradually increasing his stock as trade increases demanded, until today he carries a large and well selected variety of goods. As a general grocer he caters to a large and representative trade and enjoys a good reputation as an accommodating and courteous man, with whom it is a pleasure to deal. Mr. Filippi also has the contract for gathering the city rubbish, in which he employes two auto trucks and two men.

Mr. Filippi was married to Miss Virginia Bruno, who was born in South America but was brought to the United States in childhood. Her parents still live here. To Mr. and Mrs. Filippi have been born two- children : John and Gloria. Public-spirited and progressive, Mr. Filippi gives encouragement and support to every movement for the public good and is numbered among the representative men of Hanford. Politically Mr. Filippi gives his support to the republican party, while his fraternal relations are with the Knights of Pythias, the Dramatic Order, Knights of Khorassan and the Fraternal Order of Eagles.

PETER J. SPALETTA.

Of all the emigrants who reach the United. States from the countries of Europe, none show a greater aptitude in adapting themselves to our peculiar institutions than those who come from Switzerland. Among those from that little rock-ribbed country who have achieved a distinctive success in this country specific mention should be made of Peter J. Spaletta, the able and popular manager of the Kings County Creamery Association in Lemoore. He was born in Switzerland, on the 11th day of February, 1890, and in childhood was brought to the United States, the family locating in Arcata, Humboldt county, California. He had finished the grammar school in his native land and later attended the schools at Arcata in order to learn the English language. Being ambitious to equip himself for a business career, he then entered the Eureka Business College, at Eureka, California, from which he was graduated in 1911. He also took a course in a correspondence school of Chicago, and was. graduated in 1921, with a diploma in the higher actuating department. Going to San Francisco in 1911, Mr. Spaletta obtained employment as a clerk in the Bank of Italy, but soon discovered that he did not like the banking business, so he secured clerical work with the Golden State Creamery Company in San Francisco. He remained with that company until 1913, when he was transferred to Lemoore as a clerk in the Golden State Creamery here and after three years was in charge of the office, until September, 1923, when he accepted a position in the same capacity with the Kings County Creamery Association in Lemoore, and on Jan­uary 20, 1924, he was made manager of the company’s business. Before he took charge the business had dwindled and was in bad shape, but under his management it has constantly and steadily grown until today it is enjoying a healthy volume of business. In order to accomplish this result Mr. Spaletta sold stock to the amount of ten thousand dollars, with which to extend the operations of the company. Their products are known as Liberty butter and Challenge butter, of which the average daily production is four thousand, five hundred pounds, and ninety per cent of this amount is sent to the Los Angeles markets. Thirty-two people are employed in the plant and three hundred and fifty milk producers furnish the required cream. The present officers of the Kings County Creamery Association are : President, J. R. Silva ; vice president, M. A. Serpa ; secretary, J. R. Vieira ; directors, M. F. Paolo, M. R. Mendes, J. G. Arlia and G. V. Mello.

Mr. Spaletta is a member of the Challenge Creamery Butter Associa­tion of Los Angeles, and an active member of the Chamber of Commerce in Lemoore, having been captain of one of the teams which solicited funds for the Chamber. He is also a member of the Knights of Columbus.

Mr. Spaletta was married to Miss Minnie Rafael of Sebastopol, Sonoma county, California, and they have a son—Eugene, aged nine years. Mr. Spaletta is an energetic, forceful and progressive man, whom to know is to admire. Owing to his many excellent qualities he enjoys the confidence and regard of the entire community.

JOHN ROSS.

In nearly every community have lived individuals who by innate ability and sheer force of character have risen above their fellows and won for themselves conspicuous places in public esteem. Such a man was the late John Ross of Hanford, who for many years was closely iden­tified with the commercial and financial history of Kings county, his career as a progressive man of affairs having been synonymous with all that was upright and honorable in citizenship. He was a public-spirited citizen whom to know was to respect and admire. He not only delighted in and encouraged public improvements and beneficent civic institutions, but assisted actively in the promotion of such interests as were conducive to the comfort and happiness of his fellow citizens. His is the story of a life that made the world better for his having lived, for his actions sprang from a heart filled with love and good feeling for humanity, and he was a blessing to all who came within the range of his influence.

John Ross was born in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, on the 11th day of February, 1845, and his death occurred on the 11th day of July, 1910, in the sixty-sixth year of his age. In the public schools of his native city he acquired a good education and in an early day he started westward in search of his fortune. Going to Wichita, Kansas, he became inter­ested in the lumber business, in which he was engaged until 1895, when he came to Hanford and purchased the interests of the Central Lumber Company, which he continued to operate with success. Later he was one of the prime movers in the organization of the Bank of Hanford, of which he was elected president, and under his guidance this institution became one of the strong and influential banks of Kings county. Mr. Ross was eminently public-spirited and no enterprise for the advancement of the city’s interests along material, civic or moral lines ever lacked his support. He rendered able and appreciated service as a trustee of the city of Hanford and as a member of the board of education. Besides the business interests mentioned he was the owner of valuable ranch property. Though a plain, unassuming gentleman, he had, by a life consistent in motive and because of his many fine qualities of head and heart, earned the sincere regard of a vast acquaintance and his death was con­sidered a distinct loss to the community which had been honored by his citizenship.

In Jamestown, New York, on September 5, 1871, Mr. Ross was married to Miss Pauline Patcher, a native of New York state, and to them were born four children, namely : Fred, John, Stephen and Mrs. Edith Olmstead. Mrs. Ross is a member of the Hanford Woman’s Club and of the First Methodist Episcopal church.

JOSEPH B. VIGARIO.

The group, of Azores islands has sent to Kings county some of its most successful and respected citizens, and among them none enjoys to a greater degree the respect of the community than does Joseph B. Vigario, successful farmer and respected citizen. He was born in Pico, Azores Islands, on the 15th day of November, 1863, the son of Manuel B. and Maria Vigario. The father was a farmer in a small way and the family finances being at a low stage, the son was compelled to go to work as soon as old enough, thereby losing the opportunity to secure a public school education. However, he was ambitious to learn and studied at every opportunity, a habit which he has always followed, so that today he is a man of wide and accurate information. At the age of eighteen years he came to the United States, his father borrowing three hundred dollars with which to defray the expense of the trip. The young man landed here with but eleven dollars in money, ignorant of the English language, and no job in sight. To many this might have been a discouraging condition, but the lad went at once to work at such employment as he could find, and eight months later sent back to his father the money he had borrowed. On the 11th of April, 1884, Mr. Vigario came to Hanford and two days later went to work for Silver Brothers, plowing with a six-horse team. He followed farming until 1889, when he bought a bunch of sheep, which required his attention until 1907, when he sold them and went to Humboldt county, this state, where he was interested in the sheep business for six months. In 1898 Mr. Vigario returned to Hanford and engaged in the mercantile business, which he successfully operated until 1909, when he sold all but a small interest in the store, and from that time to the present has been engaged in farming, fruit and stock raising, in which he has met with very gratifying success. In 1923 he built a fine home, which contains all modern improvements, and he is very comfortably situated.

Politically Mr. Vigario gives his support to the republican party and he is a member of two Portuguese societies, the I. D. E. S., of which he is a past president ; and the U. P. C. S., of which he is now president.

Mr. Vigario was married to Miss Rosa B. Raphel, who was born and reared in Sonoma county, California, and they are the parents of the following children : Clarence, who is an eye specialist ; Lee, a pharmacist ; Earl, a student in high school ; Eleanor ; and Bernice. Mr. Vigario has been an eye-witness of the wonderful development of this section of the state, for when he first came here Hanford was but a village, with but few improvements and giving but little promise of the present thriving and prosperous city. He has at all times given his support to all move­ments for the betterment of the community and is numbered among its progressive and substantial citizens.

JOSEPH P. PINHEIRO.

Success never comes to the indolent and ambitionless, but comes only as a result of legitimate and well applied energy, unflagging determination to succeed, regardless of obstacles. The subject of this review came to this country handicapped by a lack of knowledge of the language and customs of the country and without financial capital, but he had the will to succeed and today is enjoying an independence which he has richly earned. He is a native of the Azores Islands, born on the 20th day of September, 1881. His parents were Antone and Mary (Simas) Pinheiro, only the latter of whom is living and remains in her native land. Antone Pinheiro was a whaler by occupation and first came to the United States in 1848. In 1860 he came to California and from here sailed the seas for twenty years. His death occurred at sea, on one of his voyages, at which time he was first mate of his ship. To these parents were born four sons, two of whom are living.

Joseph P. Pinheiro attended the public schools of his native land and at the age of nineteen years came to the United States. His destination was Hanford, where he arrived practically penniless, but he immediately sought work and for three years worked in the sheep camp of Miller & Lux, being employed as a camp tender. He then bought sheep and ran them on his own account for three years. Having saved his money, he re­turned to his native land with the intention of bringing his family to this country, and remained there ten months. Upon his return to Kings county he entered the employ of Samuel Biddle, with whom he remailled---- a year, and then for the same length of time was employed in a store in Hanford. During the following two years he worked in a restaurant and later clerked in a grocery store for a year. Mr. Pinheiro bought an interest in the Hanford Produce Company, but in 1917 sold out. Since 1916 he has been employed as notary public and agent for a steamship line. In 1915 he was elected state president of the Irmandade Devino Espirito Santo, holding that position for one year; since which time he has been a member of the supreme board of directors of that society. In 1912 he had been elected secretary of this society and of the Uniao Portuguesa Estado California, in which positions he has served continuously since.

In September, 1923, Mr. Pinheiro engaged in the grocery business, which is now conducted under the name of the East Side Cash Grocery, and he has met with splendid success in this enterprise. He gives close attention to the needs of his trade and, by his courteous and fair treatment, has gained his full share of the local custom in his line. Besides his grocery business, Mr. Pinheiro is also interested in sheep farming and dairying, in which he is meeting with gratifying success.

In 1900 Mr. Pinheiro was married to’ Miss Maria Paulina Pinheiro, and they are the parents of three children : Mary, Joseph and Manuel. He is a republican in his political views and besides the organizations already mentioned he is affiliated with the Woodmen of the World, the United Ancient Order of Druids the Portuguese Fraternity of the United States of America and the Association Portuguese Protection Beneficent. The prosperity which he enjoys has been won because of his commend­able qualities and his personal worth has gained for him the high esteem in which he is held.

ED T. SMITH.

Ed T. Smith, efficient and popular public official and influential citizen of Hanford, was born in Chicago, Illinois, on the 25th day of July, 1866, a son of Anthony Wayne and Elizabeth Christina (Lyon) Smith. Both of these parents are now deceased, the father dying in February, 1924, and the mother on November 6, 1910. Anthony W. Smith was a veteran of the War of the Rebellion and upon the cessation of hostilities retired from the military service with the rank of major. A civil engineer by profession, upon his return to civil life he became connected with the department of public works of the city of Chicago, where he rendered able service for a number of years. He also engaged as a contractor in large excavation and deep foundation works and it was he who first suggested the feasibility of sinking caissons to bed-rock to establish firm foundations for the Chicago skyscrapers. In the later years of his life he retired from active business pursuits and came to California, where he passed his remaining years.

Ed T. Smith received his educational training in the public schools of his native city. After graduation from the high school he entered the employ of his uncle, a bridge building contractor. Subsequently he en­gaged in that business on his own account for two years. In 1902 Mr. Smith came to Hanford, California, and became a reporter on the Hanford Journal, but a few years later he resigned that position and entered into the insurance and abstract business as an employe of E. E. Bush. This business association was discontinued in 1913 and since that time Mr. Smith has conducted his own abstract office, in which he has met with very gratifying success. Careful, methodical and accurate in making up his records, he has commanded his full share of business in his line. In 1921 he was elected county coroner and public administrator of Kings county, in which dual capacity he is giving faithful and ap­preciated service to the people of his county.

Mr. Smith was married to Miss Lillian A. Dold, a native of Indiana. Politically Mr. Smith is an ardent supporter of the republican party, while his religious affiliation is with the Christian church, of which he is a trustee and deacon. His fraternal relations are with the Masons, in which order he has attained the degree of a Knight Templar, and is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, and he belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World. He is a prominent mem­ber of the Kiwanis Club and a trustee of the Hanford public library. In local civic work Mr. Smith has long been very active, devoting much time and effort to the promotion of the Young Men’s Christian Association and the Boy Scouts. He is deeply interested in the welfare of young men, among whom he enjoys notable popularity. The young men and boys of the community all know him personally and they love him as “Ed T”— their friend and companion. Mr. Smith is very fond of outdoor life and greatly enjoys the games of golf and quoits, in both of which he is an expert. He is a constant and close reader of literature and science and is a man of wide and accurate information. Personally genial and approachable, he enjoys the esteem and confidence of the community to a noteworthy degree.

ROMAN PENA.

The gentleman to a brief review of whose life the following lines are devoted is among the- favorably known and representative citizens of Kings county, for he has by his indomitable enterprise and progressive methods contributed in a material way to the advancement of his community. He was born in Eagle Pass, Texas, on the 15th day of March, 1883, and his parents were Jose Maria and Aurelia Pena, both of. whom died when their son was but a child. The father had bought a farm in Mexico and they resided there during the remainder of their lives.

Roman Pena lived in Mexico until he was fourteen years of age, when he went to Arizona, where he remained but a short time, going thence to California. In 1897 he came to Hanford and obtained work on a near-by ranch. In 1901 he went to Alaska and during one season was employed in the salmon canneries there. Upon his return to Hanford he went to work for the Hanford Mercantile Company, which was later bought by the Valley Lumber Company, whereupon Mr. Pena went to work for the Charles Nelson Company, being employed by that concern in various places until 1916. In the latter year he went into business on his own account, opening a general merchandise store on West Third street, and in this enterprise he has met with gratifying success. He carries a large and well diversified stock of goods and because of his sound business methods and his courteous treatment of his customers, he has built up a large and representative trade.

Mr. Pena was married to Miss Angeleta Sesmas, who was born and reared in Sacramento, California, and they have three children: Sadie, Joseph and Alice. Mr. Pena has advocated and supported every movement calculated to benefit the community in a material, civic or moral way, and therefore enjoys the good will and esteem of all classes. The democratic party draws his political support and he is affiliated fra­ternally with the Woodmen of the World and the Alliance Hespana Americana.

JOHN COOPER LEGGETT.

Among the “old-timers” of Hanford, who have been a witness of and active participant in the splendid growth and improvement which has marked this section of the country, is John C. Leggett, who for nearly a quarter of a century has rendered efficient and appreciated service as superintendent of streets. He was born in the state of Tennessee, on the 13th day of April, 1863, a son of John Calvin and Elizabeth (Musgraves) Leggett, both of whom are deceased.

The family were in but moderate circumstances and John Cooper Leggett did not have much opportunity for an education, his services being required in helping to support the family. The schools of that day in that locality were rather primitive anyhow and those who were able to attend the sessions held in rude log schools, with their split log benches and other rude equipment did not receive very advanced training. In 1879 the Leggett family came to California, but returned to their former home a year later. In 1881, John Cooper Leggett came back to the Golden state, locating in Visalia, where an uncle lived. A short time afterward he came to Hanford, which at that time was a village of about five hundred inhabitants. Here he engaged in draying, which he followed for about nine years, and then went to work for the city. Four years later, in 1903, he was appointed superintendent of streets and has held that position continuously since.

Mr. Leggett has witnessed a great transformation in the physical make-up of Hanford since he first came here. At that time all the build­ings were of wood, there were no pavements of any sort and at times Seventh street was such a mire of mud that it was almost impossible to cross it. There was but one street leading out of the city to the north and Mr. Leggett superintended the opening of most of the streets, pulling up grape vines and tearing down wire fences and other obstructions. During the intervening years he has faithfully endeavored to keep the thoroughfares of the city in the best possible condition at all times and his efforts have not failed of appreciation by his fellow citizens.

Mr. Leggett has been married twice. He was first married to Miss Lizzie Jones, of Hanford, and to them was born a son : Sidney, who now lives in Reno, Nevada. Mr. Leggett’s second wife was Miss Lucy Gilstrap of Selma, California, before her marriage. Politically, Mr. Leggett is independent, preferring to cast his vote according to the dictates of his conscience. He belongs to the Woodmen of the World and is a popular member of the circle in which he moves.

H.   L. REDD.

H.   L. Redd, who enjoys the reputation of being one of the most expert dairymen in the San Joaquin valley, is also an enterprising and public- spirited citizen who enjoys a well deserved popularity throughout the locality where he lives. He is a native of South Carolina, born on the 19th day of September, 1893, the son of B. G. and Mary (Chapman) Redd.

H.   L. Redd secured his education in the common schools of his native community and from boyhood has been familiar with dairying. He learned in the school of experience the valuable lessons which he has since so thoroughly exemplified in his career as a dairyman. A keen observer and a deep thinker, he found out for himself many facts which have been keynotes to his work in later years. After working for some years in his native state he came west and was employed in several of the leading dairies in Washington and California. In 1921 he took charge of the Helm dairy in Corcoran and has achieved a splendid record, one that redounds greatly to his prestige. The Helm dairy ranch comprises three hundred and twenty acres and is well stocked with pure bred Holstein cows and bulls. To this dairy belongs the honor of possessing the world’s champion mulch cow, “Helen Veeman Woodcrest,” a four-year-old, which produced the enormous quantity of thirty-six thousand, two hundred and seventeen pounds of milk from October, 1923, to October, 1924._ Her largest daily production was one hundred and thirty-one and seven-tenths pounds. They also own the honor roll bull of the United States and Canada, a ten-year-old, “Sir Veeman Korndyke Pontiac.” Other record breaking cows are in this herd and their record is one of which the Helm dairy has a reason to be proud. There are eight cows that average over 30,000 pounds of milk. Mr. Redd takes pride in the fact that the prize cow mentioned was raised by him.

Mr. Redd was married to Miss Elsie Maine Hamlin, a native of Mis­souri, and they have three children June, Donald and Stanley. Mr. Redd is a Mason.

JOHN H. DAWSON.

In the death of John H. Dawson, which occurred on the 12th day of April, 1923, Kings county was bereft of one of the most beloved and appreciated men who have ever honored it with his citizenship—loved because of the kindly relations which always existed between him and all with whom he came in contact, and appreciated because of his sterling integrity, marked ability and strength of character. Although modest and unassuming and always easily approached, he had a sturdy and vigorous personality and in the best sense of the term was a leader of men, exerting a large influence in the public and civic affairs of his city and county.

John H. Dawson was born in Grant county, Wisconsin, on the 23d day of August, 1854, received his educational training in the public schools of his locality and remained at home until attaining his majority. In 1875 he started west and for a time worked at mining in Nevada. In 1876 he came to what is now Kings county and for several years was employed on the Tom Thornton ranch. In 1882 he started into business on his own account and began grain farming As he was prospered he added to his land-holdings until he was numbered among the large grain farmers in this section of the county. The home ranch, north of Hanford, comprised three hundred and twenty acres, though much of this land has since been sold, only eighty acres now remaining in the possession of the family. During the later years of his activities, he gave much attention to fruit and dairying. Farsighted and sound in his judgment of things, he recognized the great need of water in the operation of land here and in 1886 he organized the People’s Ditch Company. He had given a good deal of intensive study to irrigation problems and was probably better fitted than any one else to head a movement of this kind. For a long time he served on the board of directors of this association and was its president at the time of his death. He was literally the father of irrigation in Kings county and thus the district is under an everlasting debt of gratitude to him for his efforts in promoting what has since proven of such inestimable benefit to the county. About twenty years ago Mr. Dawson organized the Lucerne Creamery in Hanford, the first creamery in Kings county to be successfully operated. It was established on a capital of eleven thousand dollars and is now greatly improved and enlarged, the most successful creamery in the valley. In addition to his other holdings Mr. Dawson also owned nineteen hundred acres of fine grazing land, comprising a mountain ranch, near Cloverdale, Sonoma county. In 1913 he bought three hundred and twenty acres of raw land on the Goshen highway, which he developed into a fine fruit ranch.

Politically Mr. Dawson was an ardent supporter of the republican party and from 1912 to 1914 served as a member of the board of trus­tees of the city of Hanford. He also rendered able service to his city as a member of the board of education.

On December 3, 1879, Mr. Dawson was married in Kingsburg, Cali­fornia, to Miss Henrietta Ehrhart, who was born and reared in Illinois, but came to California in 1878. To this union were born four children, namely : William 0., Lucile, Cidney and John J. Mr. Dawson was a man of singularly sweet and genuine nature, a lover of his home and devoted to his family. Those who knew him best mourn him not as the public official and successful business man, worthy as his achievements were, but as the good citizen, the loving father, the faithful husband and the loyal and true friend.

WILLIAM W. SHEAHAN.

Probably no citizen of Kings county in the same period of years has taken a more active and effectual part in advancing the interests of the community, especially along the line of the development of the ranch interests, than has William W. Sheahan, the efficient and faithful clerk of the city of Lemoore. He was born in Clay county, Nebraska, on the 7th day of January, 1877. When he was five years old the family moved to Knox county, Illinois, where he was reared and attended school. Upon attaining mature years he went to work on farms, but some time later went to Peoria, Illinois, and became a clerk in the wholesale hardware house of Clark, Quein & Morse, with whom he remained four years. He then resumed farming in Illinois, which engaged his attention for seven years, at the end of which time, in the spring of 1911, he came to Kings county. Buying a ranch near Stratford, he engaged in the dairy business, in which he met with a very gratifying measure of success. In the spring of 1924 Mr. Sheahan was elected city clerk of Lemoore, whereupon he leased his ranch and moved to this city, where he now resides. He has so conducted the affairs of his office as to win the hearty approval of his fellow citizens, being capable in a business way and accommodating and courteous in his relations with the public. Mr. Sheahan owns eighty acres of land near Stratford, planted to alfalfa.

Since coming to Kings county Mr. Sheahan has taken an active interest in irrigation projects, having given much study to this problem, and has been influential in the development of irrigation. At the present time he is assessor, collector and treasurer of the Lemoore irrigation district. He is a director of the Lemoore Canal & Irrigation Company, a director in the Jacob Rancho Water Company and in every possible way exerts his influence to the end that the farmers of this district may realize the greatest possible returns from their land. He was formerly a director of the Lake View school district and was one of the advocates and promoters of the new schoolhouse built there.

Mr. Sheahan was married to Miss Iona B. Sellon, who was born and reared in Galva, Henry county, Illinois, and they are the parents of three daughters ; Gladys, Austa and Margaret. Personally Mr. Sheahan is genial and approachable, and by a life consistent in motive and because of his many fine qualities of head and heart, he has earned the sincere regard of a vast acquaintance.

ISAIAH SHOUMAN.

To a great ,extent the prosperity of our country has been due to the honest industry, the sturdy perseverance and the wise economy which so prominently characterize the foreign element that has entered largely into our population, for these people have recognized the fact that, by comparison with their old country surroundings, in America lie the greatest opportunities for the man of ambition and energy. Isaiah Shouman is a native of Russia, born on the 28th day of March, 1886, a son of Solomon and Rosa Shouman. Prior to the World war Solomon Shouman conducted a successful mercantile business, but was killed during the great conflict, his wife dying soon afterward.

Isaiah Shouman received a good education in the public schools of his native land, and then was employed in the grain business, in which he was an expert, importing and exporting to Germany and England. In 1915 he came to the United States, war conditions having wrecked his business in Russia. He first located in Fresno, where his condition, without money and ignorant of the English language, was anything but pleasant. But, determined to succeed here, he wisely first applied himself to a study of the language, in the acquiring of which he made quick progress. In 1917 he came to Hanford and at once engaged in business on his own account as a dealer in furniture. Starting in a modest way, but displaying his small stock to the best advantage and giving to every customer the most careful consideration, he gradually won the confidence of the buying public and his business steadily increased until at the present time he is carrying one of the largest stocks of furniture in Hanford, and in addition is also conducting a department for second-hand furniture, for which there is always some demand. He employs six salesmen and gives his personal attention to every detail of the business.

Mr. Shouman was married to Miss Reva Shenson, who was born and reared in San Francisco, and they are the parents of two children : Berdine Mersella and Stanley. Through his laudable ambition and persistent en­deavor Mr. Shouman has won his way from a humble position to a position of honor in business circles and has absorbed the spirit of his adopted country, giving hearty support to all movements for the betterment of the community welfare and the upholding of our institutions.

Mr. Shouman gives his support to the republican party and is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World, the Independent Order of B’nai B’rith and the Eagles.

VERNON W. HENLEY.

In a survey of the various institutions and agencies which have con­tributed to the development and welfare of Lemoore, the Chamber of Commerce will be quickly recognized as of paramount importance and value. Much of the activity of this body naturally emanates through the office of the secretary, who is the personal representative of that or­ganization in its dealings with the public. The present efficient secretary of the Lemoore Chamber of Commerce is Vernon W. Hanley, who was born in Douglas county, Illinois, on the 26th day of October, 1874. He acquired his education in the public schools of that locality and after leaving school went to Charleston, Illinois, where he became apprenticed to learn the printing trade in the office of the Charleston Plain Dealer, at a wage of one dollar and fifty cents a week. From “printer’s devil” he became master printer and in 1898 he went to Decatur, Illinois, where for twelve years he was employed in the job printing department of the Review Printing & Stationery Company, first as foreman of the composing room and during the last eight years as superintendent of the plant. Desiring a change, Mr. Henley went to Colorado and for one and a half years was engaged in ranching in the San Luis valley. In December, 1910, he came to Kings county and developed a forty-acre ranch, located south of Lemoore, where he still makes his home. The ranch is devoted maim to apricots and vineyard. He gave the improvement and development of this ranch the same careful and painstaking attention he gives to everything he does and it is now one of the best improved and most attractive ranch homes in this vicinity.

In 1924 Mr. Henley was elected a director of the Lemoore Chamber of Commerce and in November of that year was chosen secretary of that organization. He is also vice president and appraiser of the Le­moore Association of the Federal Farm Loan Company. In his business. as in his private life, Mr. Henley is controlled by the most rigid rules of business ethics and by his conception of man’s duty to man. He is a public-spirited citizen and withholds his cooperation from no movement which is intended to promote public improvements. What he has achieved in life proves the force of his character and his steadfastness of purpose, for by his own efforts he has advanced to a position of credit and honor in the community where he lives. Fraternally he is past master of Welcome Lodge No. 256, A. F. & A. M. of Lemoore and is now its secretary ; also of the Chapter at Hanford, and Hanford Commandery No. 46, Knights Templars.

HARRY V. BRENTON.

Among the progressive and up-to-date citizens of Kings county who have contributed in a very definite way to the prosperity of this com­munity is Harry V. Brenton, president of the Bush Garage Company, in Hanford. This concern was first established on January 13, 1913, at No. 224 East Sixth street, by E. E. Bush. Some time after coming here, Mr. Brenton acquired stock in the company and eventually became its president, the relation which he now holds. The principal business of this company now is the wrecking of automobiles, through which it is building up a stock of parts which enables it to supply practically any piece desired for any type of car, old or new. It has calls from over a wide radius of surrounding country and ten employes are kept busy rendering service to the large trade. In addition to the salvaged stock, a vast amount of new stuff is carried, including tires and a full line of accessories. A complete and well equipped machine shop is maintained, where repair work can be quickly done. The Bush company is not a competitor of other garages, but stands in the position of a supply house to which they may come for needed parts. A large share of the success of this company has been due to the wise direction and sound judgment of Mr. Brenton, who has worked indefatigably to make the garage a real service house for all automobile requirements.

RAY W. HALL.

One of the progressive and successful business men of Kings county, whose indomitable courage, persistent and aggressive efforts, and excellent management have brought to him the prosperity which he enjoys today, is Ray W. Hall. He has ever stood ready to do what he could to push forward the wheels of progress and advance the commercial prosperity of his section of the state, and his career has been such as to earn for him the respect of the entire community. He is the proprietor of the leading dairy in Hanford, and was born in Green Bay, Wisconsin, on the 23d day of March, 1877, a son of Charles and Emma (Fairfield) Hall. Charles Hall was a well known minister of the Gospel and for many years devoted his life to missionary work in southern Africa and in the West Indian islands. He and his faithful wife are both deceased. Ray W. Hall received a good public school education, which he supplemented by study in Union College, at Lincoln, Nebraska. After leav­ing college he was employed in railroad work for about a year and a half. In 1897 he came to Kings county and went to work on a ranch for T. McCarthy, followed by four years on the ranch of Robert Dougherty. Mr. Hall then bought a ranch, which he operated on his own account until 1922, when he came to Hanford and established a dairy. While on his ranch he had operated a dairy business to a limited extent, but sufficient to impress him with the possibilities of the business. He has been very successful since starting his Hanford dairy and has made many substantial improvements, installing much up-to-date equipment, at considerable cost, so that today he is prepared to take care of his large and steadily increasing trade. He buys his milk, all of which must be from thoroughbreds of the best strains, and the greatest care is taken in the handling of the product from cow to customer. Seven men are required to handle the business and three motor trucks make deliveries.

Politically Mr. Hall gives his support to the democratic party, while his social affiliation is with the Fraternal Order of Eagles. Mr. Hall was married in Reno, Nevada, in 1903, to Grace Dillon, and they were the parents of two sons : Mart, who is his father’s assistant in the operation of the dairy; and Glenn, who saw service with the United States army during the World war. There is also one grandchild, Ruth Elaine Hall. Mr. Hall was married on December 24, 1921, in Hanford, to Miss Josephine Allen, who was born and reared in Kansas. Mr. Hall is a genial and accommodating gentleman, with whom it is a pleasure to transact business, and he enjoys a deserved popularity throughout Kings county. Mr. Hall owns eighty acres just south of Hanford, where there is located an up-to-date dairy.

THOMAS HARRISON.

Among those persons who have by their strong individual qualities earned their way to a high standing in the estimation of their fellow citizens stands Thomas Harrison, the present efficient secretary-treasurer and manager of the Hanford Fuel Company. He is a native of England, born in Mapperley, Nottingham, on the 31st day of May, 1876. His parents were T. H. and Louise (Tipton) Harrison, the former of whom was engaged in the insurance and loan business, and was also a Vropert owner. He is now deceased, and his widow still resides in Nottingham.

Thomas Harrison received his educational training in the public and high schools of his native city, and then for three and a half years was employed as a bookkeeper. Desiring a field of larger opportunity for .advancement, he relinquished his position and came to the United States, arriving in Hanford on May 5, 1895. He was at that time none too strong for a time. He then engaged in farming, operating a rented place for four years. At the end of that time he bought a forty-acre tract, part of which was planted to orchard, and operated that place until 1920, when he sold it and accepted the position of foreman for the Stewart Fruit Company. Some time later he established a service station, one of the first in Hanford, which he conducted personally until 1923, when he acquired stock in the Hanford Fuel Company, of which he is now manager, also holding the dual position of secretary and treasurer. Under his direction the business of the company has enjoyed a satisfactory growth from year to year and is now one of the most important concerns in its line in this section. Mr. Harrison still owns and operates the service station on the highway at the west edge of Hanford.

Mr. Harrison was married on March 11, 1920, to Miss Esther Felton of Hanford, who was born and reared in Potsdam, New York. They have one child : Felton LeRoy, born June 8, 1925. Politically Mr. Harrison is an ardent supporter of the republican party and takes a keen interest in public affairs, especially those relating to his own community. He is genial and approachable, enjoys a large acquaintance, and is a popular member of the circles in which he moves.

ANTONE F. SILVEIRA.

Among the citizens of Kings county who have built up a highly credit­able business and have distinguished themselves by right and honorable living is Antone F. Silveira, prominent merchant of Hanford, another of the large number of foreign-born citizens who have done such a commendable work in the upbuilding of Kings county.. He is a native of the Azore Islands, born on the 21st day of April, 1891, the son of M. F. and Agada Silveira, of whom only the latter is living. M. F. Silveira made several trips to California, coming here the first time in 1860, and spent most of his time thereafter in this state.

Antone F. Silveira received his educational training in the public schools of the Azores, and in 1908, at the age of fifteen years, came to California and to Kings county. His first employment was in milking cows, but during the following three years he did all kinds of ranch work. During the following year he was employed in a livery stable in Hanford, and then went to work as a delivery boy in the grocery department of the Hanford Mercantile Company, with whom he remained for eight years, having been promoted to a clerkship and during the last year acting as manager of the grocery department. During the following year Mr. Silveira engaged in the selling of life insurance, and then formed a partnership with M. N. Faria and in 1916 bought the Hanford Produce Company. They were successful in their operations, the business having grown to such an extent as to require larger accommodations, so in 1919 the store was transferred to its present location, at Sixth and Irwin streets. Twenty-five men are employed, besides seven men in the hardware department, which has been added to the original stock. In the achievement of these splendid results Mr. Silveira has demonstrated himself as the possessor of those elements of character which are most likely to insure results in any undertaking—fidelity to duty, conscientious honesty in dealing with customers and the happy faculty of winning and retaining the friendship of all with whom he comes into contact.

Mr. Silveira was married to Miss Ethel O’Brien of Hanford, and they have one child : Lois. Mr. Silveira is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Druids, the U. P. E. C. and the I. D. E. S.

WILLIAM R. CRAIN.

One of the widely and favorably known citizens of Kings county is William R. Crain, who occupies the responsible position of foreman of the county machine shop in Hanford. He was born on a farm in south­ern Illinois, December 19, 1877, a son of William R. and Mary (Spence) Crain, both of whom are now deceased.

William R. Crain of this review was reared in the routine life of the average farm boy and secured his elemental education in the public schools of that locality, supplementing this by a course of study in the Northern Indiana Normal School. He continued to follow farming for a number of years and then turned his attention to the handling of farm machinery, for which he had a natural aptitude. In the operation of threshers, baling machines and other heavy machines he acquired a first­hand knowledge of mechanics that made him an expert in that line. He operated the first steam tractor in southern Illinois and in later years, after the advent of more tractors, he was generally engaged in their repair. In 1911 he relinquished farming operations and confined his labor entirely to the repair of machinery. In 1916 Mr. Crain came to California, spending a year in Sierra Madre, and then went to Selma, where he bought a garage, which he operated for one year. During the ensuing nine months he was employed in a garage in Visalia, and then came to Hanford and engaged in the selling of lighting plants for farms. His next employment was in the county machine shop, where he showed himself so thorough a master of machinery that a year later he–was­ made foreman of the shop, which position he still holds. Here all the county machinery is repaired and maintained in good shape and Mr. Crain has so performed his duties as to win the hearty commendation of the county officials. Painstaking and exact in everything he does, he has saved the county much time and money by his deftness and ingenuity in the handling of the machinery turned over to him. He possesses to a marked degree those qualities which beget friendship and he has won the respect and confidence of all who have come into contact with him.

Mr. Crain was married to Miss Effie Houston, who was born and reared in Illinois, and they are the parents of four children : Lee, Ray, Lois and Unis. Mr. Crain is a republican in his political views and is a Mason and a Knight of Pythias.

L. P. MITCHELL.

L. P. Mitchell, to a brief review of whose life the following lines are devoted, is prominently connected with the journalism of the San Joaquin valley, and at this time is editor and publisher of the Corcoran Journal, which compares favorably with the best local sheets in this section of the state in news, editorial ability and mechanical execution. L. P. Mitchell was born in Jamestown, New York, on the 30th day of January, 1864, the son of John C. and Mary (Pease) Mitchell, members of promi­nent old New York families. John C. Mitchell followed the vocation of farming and was highly respected in his community.

L. P. Mitchell attended the common schools, but at the age of fourteen years he laid aside his textbooks and entered a printing office. He thoroughly learned the printing trade and has been identified with it in some way ever since. After being employed on papers in the vicinity of his home for several years, he went to Rockford, Illinois, where he worked on newspapers for several years. He then went to Azusa, California, and bought the Pomotropic, which he published until 1908, when he came to Corcoran and established the Journal. In 1913 he sold this paper and went to Owensmouth, California, where he purchased the Gazette. He ran that paper for five years and then returned to Corcoran and bought back the Journal, which he has published ever since. Mr. Mitchell is a forceful writer and a man of positive convictions, and through the columns of the Journal he has wielded a large and potent influence upon the life of the community, giving hearty support at all times to every movement tending to advance the best interests of the public. He was one of the organizers of the Chamber of Commerce and served a term as president. Fraternally he is a Mason and belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America.

In 1891 Mr. Mitchell was married to Miss Helen Hemstreet, also a native of New York state. Their only child, Hervey Frederick, was killed in Fresno, on January 30, 1925, while on duty in the plant of the San Joaquin Power & Light Corporation. The real cause of his death’ will never be known, as he was instantly electrocuted while working about a switchboard at 0 street substation, of which he was construc­tion superintendent. He was a careful workman, but often took upon himself dangerous tasks in order to spare others from the risk involved. After graduating from the Owensmouth high school he entered the Pasa­dena School of Technology. During the World war he served as an engineer in the One Hundred and Eightieth Provisional Company, United States army, being stationed at Camp Hancock. He was a member of the Masonic order, in which he had taken the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite ; the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks; the Ancient Egyptian Order of Sciots ; and the American Legion. He was a young man of clean and upright character and was greatly beloved by all who knew him.

SAM H. HIRD.

The record of Mr. Hird is that of a man who by his own unaided efforts worked his way from a modest beginning to his present position of prosperity in business affairs and influence in his community. Sam H. Hird is English by nativity, born in the city of Bradford, Yorkshire, on the 30th day of October, 1879. His parents were Edward and Mary Jane (Thompson) Hird, the former of whom conducted a butcher shop up to the time of his death. He never left his native land, except for a brief visit to the United States.

Sam H. Hird was educated in the public schools of his native city and took a course in a business college. He was then apprenticed to learn the trade of a butcher under his father, with whom he remained until twenty years of age, when he came to the United States. He first located in Selma, California, where for fifteen months he was employed on a ranch. While on a duck hunting trip, he came through Kings county, and, while stopping in Hanford, got acquainted with Lavoy Landis, a butcher, by whom he was given a position in his meat market. Some time later Mr. Hird returned to Selma and for six months worked in Charles Ward’s meat market there. He then returned to Hanford and again entered the employ of Mr. Landis. Soon afterward the latter sold the business to S. E. Biddle, Jr., and in January, 1912, Mr. Hird bought the business from Mr. Biddle. The business was at that time conducted on a small scale, but under the management of its present owner it has grown steadily, each year showing a substantial increase over the preceding year. Many permanent and substantial improvements have been made in the shop, including a large and up-to-date refrigerator and other new equipment, until today it will compare favorably with other shops in the community. Mr. Hird employs three assistants and buys and butchers all his own meat. His life has been characterized by unceasing industry and perseverance and the systematic and honorable methods which he has followed have won him the un­bounded confidence of his fellow citizens of Hanford and Kings county:

Mr. Hird was married to Miss Clara M. Brown of Selma, and to them have been born three children; Edward, Dorice and Irving. Mr. Hird’s political affiliation is with the republican party, while fraternally he is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Improved Order of Red Men and the Woodmen of the World.

LYMAN L. FOLLETT.

Wonderful indeed has been the transformation of the territory comprised in what is now Kings county since it was first beheld by Lyman L. Follett, whose residence here covers a period of fifty years, and during this period his family had an important and leading part in its development. He was born in Mahaska county, Iowa, on the 21st day of August, 1869, son of Granville W. and Lucy (Abell) Follett, both of whom were born and reared in the state of Ohio. The Follett family arrived in. what is now Kings county in 1875, settling on the present site of Lemoore. The father and two other men owned squatter sites adjacent to the land on which the city is now located. Later they turned the land over to the railroad. At one time Granville Follett was the owner of three sections of land here and he took an active part in the early development of the locality. He erected the first store building in Lemoore and operated the first store. He also operated a threshing machine over the district and rendered efficient service for eight years as assessor of Kings county. He died in 1911, leaving two sons—Lyman L., the imme­diate subject of this sketch; and Claude W., of Tuolumne county, Cali­fornia.

Lyman L. Follett was but six years of age when brought by his par­ents to this district. He secured his education in the public school which was early established in Lemoore and in the Boys high school in San Francisco. His first employment was at mechanical engineering, which engaged his attention for fifteen years, and then for three years he served as deputy assessor under his father. In 1911 he was appointed city clerk of Lemoore and held that position continuously until the spring of 1924, earning the commendation of his fellow citizens for his faithful and conscientious performance of the duties of the office.

In 1911 Mr. Follett engaged in the insurance business and has during the subsequent years built up one of the largest clienteles in this line in Kings county. He sells insurance of all kinds, writes indemnity and assurance bonds, and other business of like character. He represents the Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company, the Hartford Insurance Com­pany and the Aetna Insurance Company, as well as other strong and responsible companies and is an energetic and efficient representative of these companies. Few men are as widely acquainted throughout the district as is Mr. Follett and he is familiar with practically every detail of the history of the district for the past half century. He remembers when Tulare lake came within three miles of Lemoore and when steam­boats plied its waters. The present site of Lemoore was in the early days one of the favorite feeding grounds for wild geese and he has seen them here in thousands. He is an interesting conversationalist and his accounts of events of the early days would make the best sort of ma­terial for the historian.

Mr. Follett was married to Kate L. Esrey and they became the parents of the following children : C. Granville, Laverne, Mrs. Eileen Blaksley, and Ernest. The mother of these children died November 20, 1908. On June 26th, 1915, Mr. Follett was married to Mrs. Ila Elder, by whom he had two children : Weston and William, Jr. In 1922 Mr. Follett was married to Mrs. Rose E. Hammer. Mr. Follett is notary public and does most of the work of this office in Lemoore. Mr. Follett is a mem­ber of the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World, and of Han­ford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

LOUIS M. AZEVEDO.

Individual enterprise is forcefully exhibited in the career of Louis M. Azevedo, one of the progressive and successful business men and representative citizens of Hanford. He is giving the same conscientious attention to the performance of his every-day duties that he did when in the service of his country during the great World war, and he is fully entitled to the respect which is accorded him by his fellow citizens. He was born in Oakland, California, on the 21st day of September, 1890, a son of Manuel and Louise J. Azevedo. The father came to California about 1885, locating in Oakland, where he was married, his bride being a native of Providence, Rhode Island.

Louis M. Azevedo received his educational training in the public schools of his native city and soon after leaving school found employment in a clothing store. He remained there until 1912, when he came to Hanford and took a position with the Hanford Mercantile Company, with whom he remained until 1917. On November 6, 1917, he enlisted for military duty and was assigned to the air service. His entire period of service was spent in Texas, two weeks at Kelly Field and the remainder of the time at Call Field, Wichita Falls. He gained a sergeant’s stripes and performed effective service in training fliers for active duty over­seas. He received an honorable discharge from the service 0 June 30, 1919, and immediately went to Gilroy, California, where for three and a half years he was engaged in the clothing business. In 1923 Mr. Azevedo came to Hanford and formed a copartnership with Messrs. F. D. Costa and M. Macedo, under the name of The Hub Store, clothiers and furnishers. This establishment, which is located at the corner of Sixth and Douty streets, has gained a high place in the esteem of the community and is enjoying its full share of the public patronage in its line.

Mr. Azevedo is a republican in his political views and takes an intelligent interest in public affairs. He is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the American Legion and the I. D. E. S. He is a keen lover of all forms of outdoor recreation, especially of baseball, hunting and fishing. Genial and unassuming in manner, he easily makes friends and has a high place in the estimation of the community.

FRANK ARMI.

America has for more than a century drained Europe of its best and warmest blood, and the result has been to stimulate our growth and development almost beyond calculation. Among the sons of Italy who have come here and become identified with our life and our institutions is Frank Armi, one of the most successful and respected citizens of Han­ford. He was born near Venice, Italy, on the 24th day of January, 1894

Frank Armi acquired his education in the schools of his native local­ity. When sixteen years of age he came to the United States, his des­tination being Hanford, Kings county. For a short time after coming here he was employed on the George McCore ranch, then he went to Goshen Junction and for a year operated a lunch room there. Selling it at the end of that time, he went to the northern part of the state, where he was variously employed for two years. Returning then to Hanford, he was engaged in business here and in Corcoran for four years, followed by three years as local agent for the San Diego Brewing Company. Upon the entry of the United States into the World war Mr. Armi enlisted and spent nine months in the army in the United States. Upon his discharge from military service he returned to Hanford and for a time was in the trucking business. In November, 1921, he bought the business in which he is now engaged, and so successful was he that in the latter part of 1924 he incorporated the business under the name of the Hanford Auto Wrecking Company, Incorporated, of which he is president. The company carries a full line of parts for practically every make of automobile, both new and old, and also carries a large and complete stock of new tires and tubes. It has trucks and trailers for sale and most anything needed in the repair of a motor or car can be found at No. 310 East Sixth street. Five men are constantly employed and the business is showing a steady increase each year.

Mr. Armi was married to Miss Mildred Montz of Fresno, California, and they have one child : Frank, Jr. Mr. Armi gives his political sup­port to the republican party and is a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Woodmen of the World and the American Legion. Mr. Armi is deeply interested in the prosperity of Hanford and gives his support to every movement for the betterment of local conditions. He is a man of fine personal qualities, and because of his industry and his upright life he enjoys the confidence and regard of his fellowmen.

N. G. PERKINS.

The man who starts in the world unaided and by sheer force of will, controlled by correct principles, forges ahead and at length reaches a position of honor among his fellow citizens, achieves a success that cannot be understood or appreciated by those who have not passed through such an experience. To a considerable extent N. G. Perkins is a representative of this class—a class which has furnished much of the bone and sinew of the country and added to the stability of our government and its institutions. N. G. Perkins was born on the 10th day of April, 1886, at Russeville, Kentucky, the son of N. G. and Safronia (Scruggs) Perkins, members of old southern families. N. G. Perkins, the father, was a farmer by vocation and a number of years ago retired from active life, moving to Wynnewood, Oklahoma, where he lived for several years prior to his death, which occurred in 1922, at the age of eighty-nine years. The maternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch—Reuben Scruggs, is still living, at the advanced age of one hundred years. During the Civil war the father and grandfather of N. G. Perkins, the younger, served in the Confederate army, as did nine of his mother’s brothers—a most unusual record.

Owing to the slender finances of his family N. G. Perkins was thrown upon his own resources at an early age and when ten years of age he was polishing shoes in a barber shop. In young manhood he began working in garages and became an expert automobile mechanic. During practically all of his life since then he has been identified with garages, working all through the south, middle west, Rocky Mountain states, Washington and California. In 1917 he and Alvin Yoder were employed in the same garage in Bakersfield and they finally decided to go into business together. Selecting Corcoran as their location, they opened the Corcoran Garage and have been eminently successful in this enterprise, now enjoying their full share of the local patronage. Energetic and enterprising, painstaking and conscientious in their work, they have earned the confidence of the people and prosperity has rewarded their efforts. Mr. Perkins is also the owner of three hundred and—twenty acres of land, which he has developed into a fine dairy, alfalfa and cotton ranch. He is a member of the Kings County Cow Testing Association.

Mr. Perkins was married to Miss Ursa Davis, a native of Chico, California. She is a lady of fine accomplishments and gracious personal­ity and is a popular member of the Thursday Club of Corcoran. Mr. Perkins is a Mason, and belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He has been president and is now vice president of the Chamber of Commerce and has served on the city council, being now on his second term. Mr. Perkins is public-spirited and gives his unreserved support to all movements for the betterment of the public welfare. Because of his accomplishments and his splendid character he enjoys to an unusual degree the respect of all who know him.

W. C. GALLAHER

W. C. Gallaher, proprietor of the Gallaher Market, Incorporated, has through a period of four decades been actively identified with business affairs in Hanford, and since entering business on his own account has succeeded in a manner that evidences his marked ability and industry. He was born in Webster county, Missouri, on the 11th day of February, 1874, a son of Charles P. and Adeline (Freeman) Gallaher, both of whom were born and reared in Missouri. W. C. Gallaher at­tended school during his early boyhood days in Missouri, but his studies there were interrupted by the removal of the family to California in 1885. They arrived in Hanford on October 15th and found here a popu­lation of about six hundred, and only two brick buildings in the town. At the age of fifteen years W. C. Gallaher went to work on neighboring ranches, continuing this for three years. At the end of that time he went to Lemoore and obtained employment in the meat market of Mr. Selbach, with whom he remained two and a half years, learning the trade. He and Isaac Burlington then leased the shop, which they oper­ated together about one and a half years, when Mr. Gallaher sold his interest to his partner and returned to Hanford. Here for three years he ran the old Hanford livery stable, and then went to work in John Wilson’s meat market, where he remained eleven months, at the end of which time he started in business for himself in a small way, and after building the business up to a creditable size he sold out in 1913 and dur­ing the following two years was engaged in buying, shipping and selling live stock, sending most of his shipments to the San Francisco markets. On February 6, 1915, Mr. Gallaher went into the butcher business on Eighth street. Here he at once met with very gratifying success and in 1920 erected the fine, modern business block which he now occupies at No. 215 West Eighth street. He incorporated the business under the name of The Gallaher Market and now carries one of the largest and most complete lines of merchandise in Hanford. He has four departments—meats, vegetables, fish and groceries—and his constant aim is to meet the wants of his customers. and to give them prompt and honest service. His efforts have been duly appreciated and he now controls his full share of the public patronage. Mr. Gallaher butchers all his own meat and for that purpose maintains a slaughter-house one mile east of Hanford. As he has succeeded Mr. Gallaher has wisely invested his funds and now owns a half section of fine land south of Hanford and this he has equipped for dairy purposes, with a fine herd of Holstein cattle. He leases this farm on shares and has found it a profitable source of income.

Mr. Gallaher is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks ; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has taken the degrees of all three branches ; the Woodmen of the World, and the Portuguese Lodges, I. D. E. S. and U. P. E. C.

Mr. Gallaher was married in Lemoore on October 11th, 1896, to Miss Laura W. Hess, a native of Tennessee. He is successful in a material way, respected in social life and discharges his civic duties in a manner becoming a liberal-minded, intelligent citizen of the community. Because of these qualities he enjoys to a marked degree the esteem and good will of his fellow citizens.

H.   SCOTT JACOBS.

Only those who come into personal contact with H. Scott Jacobs of Hanford, scion of one of the worthy old families of Kings county, and one of the popular and successful attorneys of this section of the state, can understand how thoroughly nature and training, habits of thought and action have enabled him to accomplish his life work and made him a representative member of his profession. He is a native of California, born in Visalia, on the 2d day of November, 1875, the son of Justin and Anna M. (Lowber) Jacobs, both of whom are deceased, the former dying in 1898 and the latter in 1920. Justin Jacobs was a man of marked ability and as a lawyer stood for years in the front rank of his profession. He was born in Troy, New York, in 1844, and in boyhood accompanied the family on their removal to Wisconsin. He received a good public school education and then, having determined to devote his life to the practice of law, he entered the law department of the University of Wisconsin, from which he was graduated in 1871, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He entered immediately into practice in that state, but in 1874 he came to California. He first located in Visalia, but two years later came to Lemoore and entered upon the practice of law. Seven years later he became a member of a law firm in San Francisco, where he remained for two years. At the end of that time he returned to Lemoore and practiced law up to the time of his election to the_ bench of the newly constituted superior court of Kings county, being the first incumbent of that position here. Upon the expiration of his first term he was elected to succeed himself, and died while in office, in 1898. He was a man of unusual qualities of character and a distinguished citizen of his community.

H.   Scott Jacobs attended the public school in Lemoore, and then entered the San Jose high school, from which he was graduated in 1894.

He then attended the Hastings Law School at San Francisco, where he completed his studies in 1899, winning the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Coming at once to Hanford, he entered upon the practice of law and is today occupying an unquestioned position among the leaders of his pro­fession in this section of the state. He has been associated as counsel with most of the important cases in the courts of this district for many years and is attorney for a number of large irrigation corporations in the Pine Flat irrigation project. He made a special study of law relating to irrigation work and is considered an authority on legal questions pertaining to it. His sound legal knowledge, his accurate judgment and clearness of statement, have given him distinct prestige among his colleagues and he is in the enjoyment of a large and lucrative legal business. His ability has not gone without specific recognition, for he served as district attorney from 1903 to 1907, and was also city attorney of Hanford for two years.

Mr. Jacobs was married to Miss Mary Elizabeth Manning, who was born in Texas, but was reared and educated in Lemoore, and to them have been born four children, namely : Elizabeth Belle, a graduate of the University of California; Justin M., a senior in the same institution ; John H., in high school ; and Mary Jane, also in the public school. Politically Mr. Jacobs is a stanch supporter of the republican party. Socially he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the World and the Native Sons of the Golden West. He is an enthusiastic advocate of outdoor recreation and finds in golf his ideal sport.

JAMES R. WILLOUGHBY.

Among the honored and respected residents of Kings county none stands higher in the esteem of those who know them than does James R. Willoughby, postmaster of Corcoran. He is a native of California, born in Ventura county, on the 11th day of September, 1890, the son of William F. and Susan (Menchaca) Willoughby, natives respectively of San Francisco and Santa Barbara. James R. Willoughby’s paternal grandfather came from the East to California in 1850, making the long trip around Cape Horn. He established and operated the first meat packing plant in California. William F. Willoughby is now living retired in Corcoran. Susan (Menchaca) Willoughby was a descendant of the Sanches family, one of California’s oldest and most illustrious Spanish families.

James R. Willoughby attended the public and high schools and after graduating from the latter he attended Heald’s Business College. He worked on a farm in Kings county with his father until 1915, when he went to Alaska, where he remained a year. In May, 1917, he volunteered for service in the United States army for the World war, and was as­signed to Special Regiment, Twenty-sixth Engineers, with which command he went to France in March, 1918. He was in the terrific fighting of the Argonne and other battles and was in the Luxembourg forest at the time the armistice was signed. He was sent to Coblentz with the first advance troops of the Army of Occupation, and remained there for some time. He was finally discharged at The Presidio, San Francisco, on April 18, 1919. He then came to Corcoran and was employed as a garage worker and tool-dresser for the National Gas & Petroleum Company until March 3, 1923, when he was appointed postmaster at Corcoran. He has discharged the duties of this office in a manner that has gained for him the approval of the department and the commendation of all the patrons of the office.

Mr. Willoughby is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the American Legion, of which. he is past post commander. He also belongs to the Forty and Eight, an overseas veterans’ organization. He is well equipped in all the essential qualifications of the gentleman and because of this, as well as of his business ability, energy and fine war record, he enjoys the unstinted confidence and regard of all who know him.

CONRAD DAVID BAHLER.

Like many other successful self-made men of southern California, Conrad David Bahler is an American by adoption only, being a native of Switzerland, from whence has come so much of the bone and sinew of this great republic. Wherever known the Swiss type is noted for thrift and enterprise, Conrad David Bahler being no exception to this rule. He was born on the 22d day of November, 1883, a son of David and Marie Bahler, both of whom are deceased. The father was well educated and in his native land followed the vocation of school teacher.

Conrad Bahier attended the excellent public schools of Switzerland and on completing his studies was apprenticed to learn the trade of a machinist. After two years so employed, he came to the United States, at the age of twenty-two years, landing in New York city, where he remained for a year. He then went to San Francisco, where he worked at his trade for five years. Then having married, he went to Coalinga, where he remained for a year, going from there to Bakersfield, which was his home during the following five years. From there he Wait 16 Visalia and five years later, in 1921, he came to Hanford, where he is apparently permanently established. After coming here Mr. Bahier engaged in the automobile repair business, being first located in the Gurney Garage, but he has since built for his own purposes a fine modern brick building at Ninth and Redington streets, where he is enjoying a large and constantly increasing patronage. He is equipped for all kinds of automobile repair work, and also carries a full line of parts, accessories, tires and other supplies, including the Exide battery. He employs two mechanics, and by prompt service, careful and conscientious work and courteous attention to the wants of his customers, he has won an enviable reputation among Hanford’s successful business men.

Mr. Bahler was married to Miss Lena Marie Marty, who was born and reared in this state, the daughter of Frank Marty of San Francisco. To Mr. and Mrs. Bahler have been born three children, namely : Lena Marie, Conrad David, Jr., and Wendal Charles. Genial and pleasant in his contact with others, Mr. Bahler has won a host of friends since com­ing to Kings county and has proven himself a worthy citizen of the community. Politically Mr. Bahler gives his support to the republican party, though he does not take an active part in public affairs. He is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World.

ATTILIO PIA.

Among the citizens of Kings county who have earned a creditable reputation and have distinguished themselves by right and honorable living is Attilio Pia, who, though of foreign birth, has contributed in a definite way to the prosperity of this community. He is a native of sunny Italy, born on the 14th day of November, 1884, a son of Ilario and Rose Pia, both of whom are still living in their native land, where the father follows farming.

Attilio Pia was educated in the schools of Italy and at the age of seventeen years came to the United States, arriving here with a cash capital of thirty dollars, but handicapped by a complete ignorance of the language of this country. He first went to South Trinidad, Colorado, where he obtained employment in the coal mines, at a daily wage of one dollar and seventy-five cents. He was ambitious, and during this period he also attended school and learned the language. After fifteen months in the mines Mr. Pia came to San Francisco, California, and for eight months was employed in a quarry. Until 1913 he was variously occu­pied around San Francisco and Oakland and then came to Hanford and for a time was employed as a farm hand and in a packing house. In 1915 he started to learn the baking trade under Samuel Adams, with whom he remained for six years. In 1921 Mr. Pia engaged in the baking business on his own account and his undertaking has been rewarded with a success even exceeding his expectations. He has built a fine, modern brick building, in which his bakery is equipped with the most improved electric machinery. He turns out a product that has won favor with the most discriminating class of people and he and his two helpers are kept busy supplying the rapidly increasing demand for his products.

The business is largely wholesale and in the management of his plant Mr. Pia has shown himself a business man of more than ordinary sagacity and sound judgment. Courteous and accommodating, he has won the respect and esteem of the public and is numbered among the enterprising and successful citizens of Hanford.

Mr. Pia was married to Miss Adalaine Virango, a native of Italy, and they are the parents of two children : Louis and Mary. Politically Mr. Pia gives his support to the republican party and takes a deep interest in the public affairs of his adopted country, of which he has proven himself a worthy citizen.

EDGAR IRWIN.

No officer of government is called upon to perform duties so serious in their possible consequences to the lives, liberties and property of their fellowmen as those employed in the performance of judicial functions. Appreciating this fact, the people of Kings county have abundant reason for satisfaction in the incumbency of the important office of justice of the peace by such a man as Edgar Irwin. He has spent all his life in Kings county, and was born in Hanford, August 27, 1887, the son of Rowen and Mary (Deardoff) Irwin, who now reside in Kern county, this state. Rowen Irwin, at the age of nineteen years, made the arduous and dan­gerous journey across the plains from the east to California: He first engaged in teaching school and soon became favorably known in his community. He was elected justice of the peace, then district attorney and was also elected to the state legislature. Later he was elected dis­trict attorney of Kern county and still practices law there.

Edgar Irwin, after completing his elemental education in the public schools, went to the Polytechnic School at Oakland, California. He then was appointed official stenographer of the district court of Kern county, so serving for four years, and was then employed in a like capacity by the law firm of Emmons & Johnstone at Bakersfield for two years. Later he was stenographer under Judges Covert and Brown in Hanford. In 1913 Mr. Irwin established in Bakersfield the Kern County Collection & Adjustment Company. This business he later sold to T. F. Allen, and in August, 1923, he was elected to a four-year term as justice of the peace of Lucerne township, Kings county. Mr. Irwin has abundantly proven his fitness for the office, discharging his official duties to the eminent sat­isfaction of the community.

Mr. Irwin was married on May 27th, 1913, to Miss Marsha Champlin, a native of Kings county and a popular member of the circles in which she moves. Mr. Irwin is a democrat in his political affiliation, though in local elections he assumes an independent attitude, voting for the men whom he considers best fitted for the offices sought. He is deeply interested in everything affecting the welfare of his community and his sup­port is always found on the right side of every moral issue. He is a lover of outdoor life, hunting and baseball being his favorite recreations.

HOWARD E. ODALE.

No better eulogium can be pronounced upon a community or upon its individual members than to point to the work they have accomplished. Theories look fine on the printed page, but in the end it is the effort in the various lines of activity which show definite results. This is essentially a utilitarian age and the man of action is very much in evidence. Among those who are promoting and conserving the best natural resources of Kings county must be included Howard E. Odale, the engineer, superintendent and manager of the Lemoore Canal & Irrigation Company. He was born in Decatur, Illinois, on the 27th day of December, 1878, and there was reared and educated. In 1898 he came to California and went to work in the oil fields at Coalinga, where he remained for three years. He then came to Lemoore and was employed at various oc­cupations until 1909, when he was employed as ditch tender for the irriga­tion company. Some time later he was made superintendent for the Empire Water Company, and from 1914 to 1920 was associated with various ditch company’s irrigation projects on Kings river. In 1920 he was appointed to his present position, where he has proven himself eminently fitted for the responsible duties which devolve upon him. Mr. Odale is a licensed surveyor and in 1918 was appointed city engineer of Lemoore. He has bought a nice ranch of fifteen acres, just outside the city limits, where he makes his home. The acreage is orchard and vineyard. He is a member of the Woodmen of the World.

Mr. Odale was married on September 3, 1902, to Miss Henrietta Green, a native of Oregon, and to them have been born four children, namely : Thomas G., aged twenty years ; Angus E., seventeen years old, who is in the United States navy and is now on the battleship Mississippi, of the Pacific fleet ; Marion Francis, aged fourteen years ; and Delos, aged ten years. Mr. Odale’s career has been marked by persistent industry, sound judgment and wise discrimination and though quiet and unassuming, he nevertheless has made a most excellent impression upon the community in which he lives.

A brief outline of the Lemoore Canal & Irrigation Company’s plant and operations will undoubtedly be of particular interest to the readers of this work. This was originally called the Lower Kings River Water Ditch Company, which was organized in 1870 and incorporated under the laws of the state of California in 1873. Prior to incorporation fifty- two shares of stock had been issued, but after incorporation the number of shares was increased to one hundred, the par value of which was three hundred dollars a share. From 1873 to 1901 this company furnished water not only to its stockholders, but also to others within accessible distance, the area irrigated extending from Green Slough, on the north, to the Empire and Jacobs ranches on the south. The west area, including the Heinlen ranch, was under thorough irrigation, but only a part of the above area was covered. From 1870 to 1881 four head gates had been constructed at the intake of the canal. In 1875 the company was granted a franchise for the construction of a brush dam in Kings river, below the intake of the canal. In 1901 and 1902 the location of the intake of the Lower Kings River Water Ditch Company was changed from section 1, township 18, range 20, to section 29, township 17, range 21, its present location, and a new canal was built from that point to section 13, township 18, range 20, where it converged with the old canal. In 1902 the name of the company was changed to the Lemoore Canal & Irrigation Company. The new canal was constructed on a uniform grade, with a bottom width of forty feet.

The area served by the Lemoore Canal & Irrigation Company includes fifty-two thousand, three hundred acres, taking in the Heinlen, Jacobs and Empire ranches and fifteen sections of independent holdings. In the system under the company’s control there are one hundred and twenty-five miles of canals and laterals. A new weir in Kings river has recently been constructed, at a cost of thirty thousand dollars. Under irrigation there are twenty-four thousand, seven hundred eighty acres of alfalfa, six thousand, one hundred and sixty-five acres of orchard; seven. thousand, eight hundred and eighty-five acres of grain ; and thirteen thousand, four hundred and seventy acres of pasture. The average size of the farms served is fifty-eight acres. The population of the district, outside of the town, is three thousand, five hundred and nine. The population of Stratford is three hundred. There are nine hundred and twenty families on the farms. The assessed valuation is two and one quarter millions of dollars, while Stratford’s valuation is thirty-seven thousand dollars. The value of farm lands is five million, six hundred and fifty thousand dollars, plus that of Stratford, which is one hundred thousand dollars.

REV. MICHAEL JOSEPH STACK.

One of the most prominent and influential religious leaders in Kings county is the present able and popular pastor of St. Brigid’s Catholic Church in Hanford, the Rev. Michael J. Stack. Father Stack was born in Ireland, on the 20th day of June, 1890, a son of William Edward and Catherine (Nolan) Stack. William E. Stack was a citizen of the United States, but the family were in Ireland when Michael Joseph of this review was born.

Michael Joseph Stack was reared in the land of his birth and secured his elemental education in the schools there. Afterward he became a stu­dent in St. Patrick’s College at Carlow, where he took the required work in philosophy and theology and in 1914 was ordained a priest and assigned to the diocese of Los Angeles. His first appointment was as assistant pastor at the Cathedral at Los Angeles, later being given active pastoral work, serving successively in Pomona, San Bernardino, Redondo Beach, then a year in Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo county, two years in Porterville, two years in Reedley, and on November 23, 1924, was appointed pastor of the church in Hanford. With a full appreciation of the importance of the work here Father Stack has taken hold of and prosecuted the parish work with a vigor and enthusiasm that has proven contagious, and today the church is enjoying the greatest prosperity in its history. Plans are being prepared for a new church building and every phase of the church’s activity is being encouraged and advanced in a very gratifying degree. Unassuming in manner, but cor­dial and earnest in his attitude to others, Father Stack has won a host of warm personal friends since coming to Hanford and is a definite and widely recognized influence for good in the community.

Father Stack is a fourth degree member of the Knights of Columbus and present state chaplain, and is also a member of the Benevolent Pro­tective Order of Elks and the Ancient Order of Hibernians. Fond of golf and other outdoor recreations, he fosters and encourages in others a love for God’s great out-of-doors and an appreciation of the beauties of Nature.

BURT NORTHROP KIRK.

Among the younger members of the active and representative list of Corcoran’s citizens stands its present mayor, Burt Northrop Kirk. He is a native of Minneapolis, Minnesota, born on the 10th day of February, 1894, the son of William H. and Edna (Fuller) Kirk, both of whom were born and reared in Clearwater, Minnesota. Mr. Kirk’s grandparents were pioneer settlers in Minnesota. William H. Kirk was for many years the agent in the Northwest for a Detroit wholesale hardware house, and is now owner of a farm and the ferry at Clearwater, though he spends his winters in California.

Burt Northrop Kirk graduated from the high school in Minneapolis and then took an extension course in the University of Minnesota. He came to Corcoran and for a short time was in the employ of the San Joaquin Light & Power Company, then entered the employ of W. H. Wright, gents’ furnishers, as clerk and has remained there since, being now manager of the store. From the time he came here Mr. Kirk has evinced an interest in local public affairs and was appointed to fill out an unexpired term in the city council. He was elected once since and is now serving as mayor of the city. He has shown himself ably qualified for the position and is serving to the entire satisfaction of the people of the city. Genial and unassuming in manner, he possesses sound judg­ment and keen discrimination and is a stanch advocate of all that is best and most elevating in community life.

Mr. Kirk was married on July 12, 1917, to Miss Helen Winifred Hardy of Minneapolis, and they are the parents of two children : Barbara H. and Northrop H. Mrs. Kirk is a graduate of the University of Minne­sota, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and taught in the high schools of Minneapolis for two years prior to her marriage to Mr. Kirk. She is a member of the Thursday Club of Corcoran and is a popular member of the circles in which she moves. Mr. Kirk is a republican in politics. Mr Kirk is a Mason, being a past master of the local lodge ; is a member of the commandery of Knights Templars and is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a director of the Corcoran Chamber of Commerce.

F. JUDSON BOWDEN.

The record of F. Judson Bowden is that of a man who by his own unaided efforts worked his way from a modest beginning to a position of responsibility and influence in the business world. The efficient and suc­cessful manager of the Lucerne Cream & Butter Company, of Hanford, he was born on a farm in old Virginia, on the 29th day of October, 1885, a son of James and Annie E. (Whitehead) Bowden, farming folk, who came to California in January, 1907, and engaged in agricultural pursuits. Both are now deceased.

F. Judson Bowden attended the public schools of his native state, and then, ambitious to secure a good education, he entered William and Mary College, at Williamsburg, Virginia. The family finances were at a low ebb and the young man had to work his own way through college. In January, 1908, he came to Hanford and during the following sixteen months he was employed in the packing department of the Lucerne Cream & Butter Company. Not satisfied with merely common labor, Mr. Bowden went to school in southern California and took a complete business course. Returning then to Hanford, he was for four months employed as assistant secretary of the Fair Association, then for a while was with the old Im­perial Garage. In January, 1912, he became bookkeeper for the Rosenberg Packing Corporation, but in the following December he returned to the company with which he is still identified. He served as secretary of the company until 1917, when his faithfulness and efficiency were recognized in his appointment as manager. The Lucerne Company is the largest creamery in the local field, manufacturing and shipping an enor­mous amount of butter to many points over a wide radius of country. Since Mr. Bowden assumed the management of the plant, the equipment has been modernized throughout and the firm is now in a position to handle all the milk that can be procured locally. Thirty men are employed and the company enjoys a high standing among the successful business concerns of this community. No small part of this success has been directly due to the unceasing industry and intelligent direction of Mr. Bowden, as well as to his personal popularity among the people of the county.

Mr. Bowden was married to Miss Edith Gamble, who was born and reared in Hanford. Her parents were pioneers of this locality and her father, David Gamble, became a prominent and successful contractor. Mr. and Mrs. Bowden have two children : Wilma Lee and Judson Gamble.

Mr. Bowden is a democrat in his political views. Fraternally he is a Mason, in which order he has taken all the degrees of the York Rite, and is a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, while his local interest is evinced by his activity in the Kiwanis Club, of which he is president. Anything that promises to be of benefit to the people of his community finds in Mr. Bowden an ardent supporter. He takes a keen interest in outdoor sports, golf being his favorite recreation.

GRANT GARNER.

The record of Grant Garner has been closely identified with the his­tory of Kings county for a quarter of a century and few men are held in higher regard in the community. He was born on the 25th day of November, 1868, in the state of Iowa, the son of James and Barbara (Sharp) Garner, both of whom were born and reared in Cass county, Indiana. James Garner, who was a pioneer settler in Iowa, was a veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted and served in an Iowa regiment, with which he saw much active service. He was later a pioneer of South Dakota.

Grant Garner secured a good public school education and upon at­taining adult years went to farming in South Dakota, following that calling there until 1900, when he came to Kings county. Here he bought a ranch, which he has successfully operated and as he has been prospered he has bought additional land until now he is the owner of three hundred and twenty acres, located five miles northeast of Hanford. The ranch is finely improved in every respect and is devoted mainly to dairy, fruit and vineyards. He is energetic, industrious and discriminating in his operation of the farm and is numbered among the progressive and up-to- date ranchers of Kings county. In 1922 Mr. Garner was elected supervisor of his district and is faithfully and conscientiously performing his duties, to the entire satisfaction of his constituents.

Mr. Garner was married on February 21, 1898, in South Dakota, to Miss Elsie Swope, and they are the parents of four children living : Grace, Hazel, Clarence and Ruth. A son, Leslie, died in 1922, at the age of eighteen years, from the effect of injuries sustained while playing football on the Hanford high school team. The members of the family move in the best social circles of the community and are popular among their associates. Mr. Garner is a genial and approachable man, who, because of his ability and success, stands high in the respect and esteem of his fellowmen. He is a republican and the family attends the Methodist church. Mr. Garner has two hundred and fifty miles of dirt road and thirty-five miles of highway under his supervision, all in the northeastern part of the county.

CHARLES E. KENDALL.

The real history of any community is comprised of the aggregate lives of its citizens, and its reputation is therefore dependent upon the charac­ter of its citizenry. Among the worthy residents of Hanford who have through the years so lived as to honor their community is Charles E. Ken­dall, the efficient chief of the city fire department and city building in­spector. He was born July 23, 1861, in Dayton, Ohio, the son of Zenas L. and Martha (Clawson) Kendall, the former of whom is deceased.

Charles E. Kendall received a good elemental education in the public schools of his native city and then learned the trade of a papermaker as an employe of the American Paper & Tablet Works. He remained with that company for fourteen years and then, in 1890, came to Kings county, California. Coming to Hanford, in partnership with a brother-in-law, he engaged in the commission business. He was so occupied for five years and then for a number of years sold sewing machines. In 1908 Mr. Kendall became identified with the city administration and has been a servant of the public ever since, rendering always faithful and con­scientious fealty to the public welfare and winning for himself the universal approbation of the community. For a number of years he had been chief of the old volunteer fire department and had shown such ability in handling fires that when the department was reorganized and the old one-horse fire wagon replaced by motorized apparatus, he was the logical man to be placed at the head of the fire fighting force. That this confidence in him was not misplaced has been abundantly verified from time to time. In addition to his duties as fire chief Mr. Kendall is also city building inspector, a position of considerable responsibility in a growing community.

Mr. Kendall was married to Miss Caroline Leisz of Dayton, Ohio, and to them have been born three children, namely : R. C., who is manager of the Tilton Lumber Company ; Mrs. Martin Snyder of San Francisco ; and Mrs. H. A. Kuney of Tulare. There are also six grandchildren. Mr. Kendall’s life has been exemplary in all respects and he and his - family have ever supported those interests which are calculated to benefit the community. Thus he has earned and retains to a marked degree the confidence and respect of all who know him. Mr. Kendall is a republican in his political views and takes an active part in the public affairs of his county and city. Fraternally, he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World and the U. P. E. C. E.

JOHN ELDER.

To John Elder belongs the unique and distinctive honor of being the oldest native son of California living in this state. It is a far cry from the days of ‘47, antedating even the discovery of gold here, to the won­derful days in which we now live ; but John Elder, of Lemoore, has witnessed the beginning and the later days of this period. He was born in San Joaquin county, this State, on the 5th day of November, 1847, when this section of country was still a territory. He is the son of Turner and Paula (Rhoades) Elder, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Illinois. In 1846 this brave couple and four children—Martin E., Eliz­abeth, Thomas, and Turner—made the long, tiresome and dangerous trip across the plains by ox team, and upon their arrival at Sacramento they lived at Sutter’s Fort the first winter, then moved down on the Cosumnes river, and it was here that John, of this review, and his twin sister were born. The father turned his attention to mining for gold in the mountains back of Sacramento. He was very successful and in 1851 he returned to Missouri, wintering in Salt Lake City, driving a pony team and light wagon in which rode his wife and six children. Upon arrival in Missouri the family located in Ray county, where Mr. Elder bought a large ranch and devoted the remainder of his life to farming, owning twenty-two slaves until the Civil war freed them. To him and his wife were born thirteen children, of whom nine grew to maturity and five are still living.

John Elder received his education in the common schools in Missouri and on attaining mature years he took up the vocation of farming, which he followed until 1875, when he joined an emigrant train en route to California. After his arrival here he obtained work on a ranch near Lemoore, Tulare county. On this trip the women of the party rode in a spring wagon, the men walking. They stopped where Lemoore now stands and on the present site of the city, Mr. Elder headed wheat that summer. In 1876 and 1877 he leased a tract of land and engaged in raising wheat. Then, going over into Fresno county, he took up claims to a quarter section of land and during the following twelve years was employed in grain farming and stock raising. Eventually he traded that place for a ranch near Corcoran, which he operated for about three years. For twelve years he ran a livery stable in Bakersfield, but sold it and came to Lemoore. Here he opened a meat market, which he has continued to the present time, a period of seventeen years in one location, and he has always enjoyed his full share of the public patronage. He owns a modern slaughter-house and ten and one-half acres of land. Through all the years of his residence in this section of the state Mr. Elder has faithfully striven to live up to the highest ideals of good citizenship and his life has been such as to win for him the universal confidence and es­teem of all who know him.

On December 17, 1868, Mr. Elder was married in Missouri to Miss Ellen Fielder, a native of Texas, and to them were born six children, four of whom are living, namely : A. R., of San Francisco ; J. C., who is associated with his father in business in Lemoore, is married and has two children ; Wm. Reece and Doris ; D. R., of Bakersfield, who is married and has one child, F. B.; and Harry B., of Walnut Grove, Sacramento county. Mr. Elder is a member of Bakersfield Parlor, No. 62, Native Sons of the Golden West. He is in comfortable circumstances, owning, besides his business, six lots and three houses in Lemoore.

WALLACE SULLIVAN.

Agriculture has been the true source of man’s dominion on earth ever since the primal existence of labor and has been the pivotal industry which has controlled for the most part all the fields of action to which his intelligence and energy have been devoted. Realizing the supreme importance of this fact, up-to-date farming communities are now bending every effort to advance the interests of those who devote themselves to the cultivation of the soil. Not the least of these agencies now is the county farm agent, whose educated intelligence is at the service of the farmer, to the latter’s benefit and profit. Wallace Sullivan, who has for six years ably filled the position of farm advisor of Kings county, representing the University of California and the United States department of agriculture, was born on a farm near Thompsonville, Illinois, on the 5th day of December, 1887, the son of Silas and Rhoda J. (Stull) Sullivan, the former of whom is deceased. Silas Sullivan followed farm­ing as a vocation, but was also a preacher of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Wallace Sullivan attended the rural schools of his native community, but was not then satisfied to settle down to the routine of ordinary farm life and work. He became a student in the Kansas State Teachers College, from which he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in education. He then entered the Colorado State Agricultural-College. where he received the degree of Bachelor of Science in agriculture, and afterward took a special course in agriculture in the University of California, at Berkeley. He then became principal of the agricultural school in Kansas, and later, for two years, was an instructor in the Colorado Agricultural College. Following this he went to Utah, where for one year

he served as county farm agent, and in January, 1918, came to Hanford and became the first farm advisor of Kings county. Mr. Sullivan has a thorough knowledge, both theoretical and practical, of all phases of farm­ing operations and is able thus to bring to farmers who need him the most advanced knowledge and science in relation to their work. Many prob­lems which formerly retarded the farmer’s work are in these days solved through the agency and assistance of these educated men, who are thus contributing in an immeasurable degree to the farmer’s success and the prosperity of the entire community. Mr. Sullivan is genial and unassum­ing and by his courteous manner and evident desire to be of practical service to the community, has won the confidence and esteem of all who are in touch with what he is doing.

Mr. Sullivan was married to Miss Mary E. Bice, of Kansas, and to them have been born the following children : Elizabeth, Wallace K., Elsie Marie, Harold B. and Katharine Aileen. Though nominally a republican in his political affiliation, Mr. Sullivan is non-partisan in local elections, feeling rightly that a candidate’s fitness for office is of more importance than the particular label he may be carrying. He is a lover of out-door sports, and from his school days has been an ardent football enthusiast.

WILLIAM P. BYRON, M. D.

Among the physicians of Kings county who have risen to eminence in their chosen field of endeavor is Dr. William P. Byron of Lemoore, whose career has been that of a broad-minded, conscientious worker in the sphere to which his life and energies have been devoted and whose skill and success have won for him a leading place in his profession. He is a native of the district which he now serves, born near Lemoore on the 22d day of October, 1878, the son of Henry W. and Rosina (Gallard) Byron, the former a native of Illinois and the latter of Australia. Henry W. Byron, who is now deceased, made the long and tiresome journey around Cape Horn in a sailing vessel, arriving in California in 1853. He went to Australia during the gold excitement there, and there met the lady who became his wife. In 1864 he returned to California and for a number of years was engaged in farming and fruit raising near Lemoore. He was prominently identified with the early activities of the district, having served as the first president of the Lower Kings River Ditch Com­pany and was horticultural commissioner of Kings county. He was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Improved Order of Red Men. His death occurred in 1919. To him and his wife were born seven children, of whom three are living, namely : L. H., of Lemoore; William P., the subject of this sketch; and Dr. Albert E., of Oakland, California.

William P. Byron secured his elemental education in the public schools of Lemoore and then, having determined to devote his life to the practice of medicine, he matriculated in the California Medical College, from which he was graduated in 1904, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Going to the state of Washington, he there practiced his profession for a year and a half, but in 1906 he came to Lemoore and has since been in prac­tice here. He has long held distinctive prestige in a calling which re­quires for its basis intellectual discipline of a high order, supplemented by rigid professional training, and his ability is recognized and appre­ciated not only in Lemoore, but also throughout the district. In addition to his long and creditable professional career, he has also proved an honorable member of the body politic, rising in the confidence and esteem of the public and commanding respect because of his public spirit and his efforts to advance the welfare of the community. Doctor Byron is health officer for the city of Lemoore, district surgeon for the Southern Pacific Railroad and county physician for the west end of Kings county. He served one term as county coroner and was also public administrator of the county for four years. He is the owner of eighty acres of fine grapes near Lemoore.

Dr. Byron was married to Miss Bella Washburn, a native of Kansas. He is a Mason, a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, and belongs to the In­dependent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the World, the  Foresters of America, the Improved Order of Red Men and the Portuguese lodges— the I. D. E. S. and U. P. E. C. Personally Dr. Byron possesses to a marked degree those elements of character which attract men and his life affords a striking example of well-defined purpose and innate ability. Measured by its accomplishment, its beneficence and its helpful optimism, his life has contributed immeasurably to the comfort and well-being of the community and he is held in correspondingly high esteem by all who know him.

CARL NELSON.

It is a pleasure to investigate the career of a successful, self-made man. Peculiar honor attaches to that individual who, beginning the great strug­gle of life in a strange country alone and unaided, gradually overcomes the obstacles in the pathway of success and by the medium of his own force and vitality succeeds in forging his way to the front, visioning for himself a competency and a position of influence and esteem among his fellowmen. Such is the record of Carl Nelson, a well known citizen of Hanford. He was born in Sweden on the 3d day of May, 1883, a son of Nels and Sophia Nelson, who still live in their homeland.

Carl Nelson secured a good practical education in the public schools of his home community, but early in life decided to emigrate to the United States, because of the greater opportunities for advancement. At the age of eighteen years he made the voyage and came at once to Kings county, California. For about one and a half years he had a hard struggle, for work was scarce and he was seriously handicapped by his inability to talk English. However, his desire and ambition would not be denied and he persisted in two things—his determination to learn the language and to secure employment. At length he was put to work by a con­tractor in Hanford, who found the young man not only a good, faithful worker, but also capable of quickly grasping new ideas and their signifi­cance. By careful economy Mr. Nelson was at length able to save enough to justify him in going into business on his own account and he began contracting, first with a partner, but after three years he began operating on his own account. These fourteen years have brought him not only a large amount of business, but what is of more importance, a well-deserved reputation as a man who fully and conscientiously performs every con­tract which he makes. He has done a large amount of building in this locality, including a number of splendid school buildings, an addition to the cannery and a large number of substantial residences. Attention to the wants and tastes of his clients, and an inviolable determination to do nothing but first-class work on every job he handles, have given him a prestige as a reliable and trustworthy business man. He enjoys his full share of the contracting business here and is numbered among the progressive and wide-awake men of the community. He gives his support to every movement that promises to be of benefit to the public and is a liberal giver to all worthy benevolent objects.

Mrs. Nelson was Miss Justine Nelson before her marriage. Mr. Nelson gives his support to the democratic party and is affiliated with the Benevo­lent Protective Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World. A lover of outdoor life, he is especially fond of hunting and fishing. Genial in his relations with others, he easily makes friends and is fond of their companionship.

F. W. DUTRA.

Among the widely known and well liked citizens of Hanford is F. W. Dutra, who is rendering efficient service as secretary and head bookkeeper of the Lucerne Creamery Company and secretary of the Hanford Mer­cantile Company. He was born on his father’s ranch in this county on the 15th day of November, 1889. His parents were Manuel and Mary Dutra, both of whom were natives of the isle of Pico, one of the Azores, whence the father came to California in 1883, followed by his wife two years later. They are remembered as among the finest citizens in their locality. They are both deceased, the father dying in 1914 and the mother in 1923. F. W. Dutra secured a good public school education, graduating from the Hanford high school, and then took a course in Heald’s Business College, from which he was graduated in 1910. He immediately went to work for the Lucerne Creamery Company and has remained with this firm ever since with the exception of two years-1911-12—when he was in Fresno. His position as secretary and bookkeeper is a responsible one and he has so efficiently discharged his duties as to win the confidence and respect of his official associates.

Mr. Dutra was married to Miss Emma F. Rose, the daughter of Manuel and Frances Rose, natives of the Azores Islands, but who came to Kings county many years ago, where Mrs. Dutra was born. Mr. and Mrs. Dutra have a daughter : Frances Louise. Mrs. Dutra is a lady of charming per­sonality and is a past supreme president of the S. P. P. S. I., and secre­tary of the local council of that order. Mr. and Mrs. Dutra live in an attractive and comfortable home at No. 425 West Florinda street, Hanford. They are a genial and hospitable couple and are extremely popular in the circles in which they move.

W. H. CORTRIGHT.

W. H. Cortright is too well known in Hanford and throughout Kings county to need any introduction to the people of either city or county, for he has long been recognized as a man of more than ordinary business acumen and ability. He was born and reared in Hillsdale, Michigan, a son of Frank and Margaret (Dow) Cortright. After completing his elemental education in the public schools, he entered Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, Michigan, from which he was graduated. He then became a student in the Michigan State Agricultural College, where he took the course in civil engineering. Coming then to the west, he first located in Colorado, where for a time he was occupied in various land and irrigation projects, followed by nine months of similar work in Arizona. Going then to Los Angeles, Mr. Cortright engaged in the concrete pipe business, in which he was successful, and was, after four years there, induced to go to San Diego, where he operated in a similar line for eight years. In 1915 Mr. Cortright came to Hanford and, in partnership with a Mr. Adell, engaged in general cement contracting. Subsequently Mr. Adell’s interest was acquired by Mr. McDougal and today the firm of Adell­Cortright Company is-one of the best known contracting firms in the San Joaquin valley. They engage in the installation of irrigation systems, all kinds of reservoirs, syphons, and have done much other work of a general character, including the making of many concrete bridges. They have gained a reputation for reliability and trustworthiness that has given them favorable consideration whenever they go after a job and They- have handled the major portion of work in their line in this vicinity.

Mr. Cortright was married to Miss Pearl Trembly, who was born and reared in the state of Illinois. Mr. Cortright is a republican in his political views and takes a deep interest in public affairs. Fraternally he is a member of the Bevenolent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. Tireless energy, keen perception and honesty of purpose, com­bined with every-day common sense, are among his chief characteristics and, while advancing individual success, he has also contributed in every way possible to the moral and material welfare of the community.

LOREN C. HAGLER.

One of the men who has stamped the impress of his strong individuality upon the minds of the people of Lemoore is Loren C. Hagler, the energetic manager of the Central Lumber Company at Lemoore. He was born in Murphysboro, Illinois, on the 17th day of November, 1885, and was reared on the paternal homestead, acquiring his education in the district schools of that locality. He came to California in 1907, arriving in Hanford on November 7th, and for a time was variously employed here. He learned the trade of carpenter and in that capacity entered the employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad. In 1910 he went to work for the Central Lumber Company in Hanford, where he learned the business in all its details. On November 1, 1924, he was made man­ager of the Lemoore branch of the Central Lumber Company, which position he has shown himself eminently qualified to fill. This company does a large business throughout this locality and Mr. Hagler’s aim is to make his company’s service indispensable to those desiring material in his line.

Mr. Hagler was married to Miss Chloe M. Carey, who was born and reared in the state of Illinois, and they have a daughter : Helen Anne, who was born October 7, 1908. Mr. Hagler is a member of the Woodmen of the World and of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is universally recognized as a splendid citizen and because of his genial manner and personal worth he enjoys the respect and esteem of all who know him.

FREDERICK MARKHAM CUTLER.

A man who has stamped the impress of his strong individuality upon the minds of the people of Kings county in a manner to render him one of the conspicuous characters of this locality, is Frederick Markham Cutler, the present county purchasing agent. Faithfulness to duty has been the dominating factor in his life and few men, in so comparatively brief a residence, have won as many warm and loyal friends here as he. A native of the old Empire state, he was born in Utica, on the 27th day of July, 1862. He is the scion of sterling old Revolutionary stock, and his antecedents are otherwise distinguished by the fact that his great-grandmother, Edna Perry, became the wife of Buckley Mather, of the famous Mather family of New England. Frederick Markham’s parents were George W. and Celista E. (Wood) Cutler, both of whom are deceased. George W. Cutler was a prominent and influential citizen of his community and served the unusual period of twenty-four years as postmaster of Ilion, New York. In 1897 the family came to California, locating in Napa county, .where the father operated a ranch up to the time of his death.

Frederick Markham Cutler attended the public schools of his native city and then entered Ilion Academy, from which he was graduated. He then took a full commercial course in the Eastman Business College, at Poughkeepsie, New York, graduating with the degree of Master of Accounts. After completing his studies he was for a short time employed in Illinois with an uncle who was in the lumber business. Then he entered the Second National Bank of Monmouth, Illinois, where he remained for a number of years. Going to New York city, Mr. Cutler entered the office of the Remington Typewriter Company as cashier, being later transferred to the auditing department. Coming to California in 1904, Mr. Cutler resided in Napa county until 1908, when he went to Richmond, Virginia, where he was employed by the Remington Typewriter Company until 1915, when he located in Hanford. During the World war Mr. Cutler was in the government service, being assigned to the housing depart­ment of the Emergency Fleet Corporation. When the close of the war terminated the work of his department, he returned to Hanford and accepted the position of county accountant and purchasing agent. This position entails large responsibilities, but Mr. Cutler’s discharge of his official duties has been of such a character as to win for him the approval of all who are familiar with the splendid work he has done.

Politically Mr. Cutler is nominally a republican, but in the casting of his ballot he invariably is guided by the individual fitness of the candi­date for the office soug-nt. He is a member of the Masonic order and is the present recorder of Hanford Commandery, Knights Templar. Fond of outdoor life, his favorite recreation is hunting and fishing. His life has become closely interwoven with the recent history of Kings county and he has at all times given his support to every movement or enterprise looking to the betterment of the public welfare. He is genial and approachable and enjoys a well-earned popularity.

JOSEPH BROEDEL.

In the respect that is accorded to men who have fought their own way to success through unfavorable environment we find an unconscious recog­nition of the intrinsic worth of a character which not only can endure so rough a test, but gain new strength through the discipline. Joseph Broedel was not favored by inherited wealth or the assistance of influential friends, but in spite of this, by perseverance, industry and a wise economy, he has attained a comfortable station in life and won the respect and esteem of his fellowmen. He is a native of New York city, born on the 8th day of August, 1882, a son of Joseph and Emma (Hepner) Broedel, the latter of whom is deceased. The father was for a number of years engaged in business in New York and is still living in that city.

Joseph Broedel attended the public schools of New York city, and when old enough began work, being variously employed for a number of years. In 1907 he decided to search for a locality affording better opportunities and came to California, locating first in Los Angeles. Six months later he located in McKittrick where he was in the laundry business, and later moved to Taft, where he remained until July, 1919, when he came to Hanford. After looking the field over here, Mr. Broedel engaged in the transfer and storage business, which proved the right thing to do, for he has from the first enjoyed a large and constantly increasing patron­age. He does ‘general transfer work and hauling, in which he employs four trucks, and also has a large and well arranged storage building at No. 102 East Sixth street. Because of his uniform courtesy and efforts to accommodate the public, he commands his full share of the local busi­ness in his line and has so conducted his affairs as to win the confidence and esteem of the entire community.

Mr. Broedel was married to Miss Mamie Basden, who was born and reared in Oklahoma, and to them have been born three children—Gloe, Ola and Gail. The republican party receives Mr. Broedel’s support and he is affiliated with the Woodmen of the World.

AUGUSTUS CALLAHAN McCLELLAN.

One of the able and successful attorneys of Kings county, who also is a veteran of the World war—Augustus Callahan McClellan—was born in Sullivan county, Tennessee, on the 23d day of August, 1888, a son of Samuel W. and Hester A. McClellan, both members of old southern fami­lies. Samuel W. McClellan was a farmer by vocation and was a man of prominence and influence in his community.

Augustus Callahan McClellan secured his elemental education in the public schools and after graduating from high school entered the law de­partment of the University of Chattanooga, from which he was graduated in 1911, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. He immediately entered upon the active practice of his profession in Chattanooga, where he remained until 1916, when he came to Los Angeles and practiced law there until he entered the army for service in the World war, in June, 1918, and was sent to Camp Lewis, then transferred to Base Hospital No. 467; then was sent overseas for service until the armistice was signed. Because of his legal experience and knowledge, he was made chief clerk in the judge advocate general’s department for the district of Paris, where he remained until discharged from the service at Wash­ington, in October, 1919. He held a commission as regimental sergeant major while in service. After returning to civil life Mr. McClellan located in Fresno for a time, but in February, 1921, he came to Corcoran and is now enjoying a large and remunerative legal practice here. He is city attorney for Corcoran, and has been employed as counsel in many im­portant cases in the Kings county courts, being numbered among the suc­cessful and representative lawyers of this county.

Mr. McClellan is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the American Legion, being chairman of the executive com­mittee of the last-named organization. He is also a member of the Cor­coran Chamber of Commerce and of the Kings County Bar Association.

Mr. McClellan was married to Miss Harriett Crawford of Fresno, a daughter of Dr. J. M. Crawford, who is secretary of the California state board of optometry. Mrs. McClellan is a graduate of Occidental College of Los Angeles and is an active participant in the club and social life of Corcoran, being president of the Thursday Club, and a member of the Federated Women’s Clubs of California and of the Women’s Auxiliary to the American Legion. Personally Mr. McClellan is genial and approachable, while in his professional work he has won a reputation as a sound and safe practitioner, enjoying to a marked degree the confidence and respect of the entire community.

GEORGE P. FLAHERTY.

A faithful and competent public official, a man of upright and honorable life, and a genial and companionable friend—these are the char­acteristics that have gained for George P. Flaherty the goodwill and confidence of all who know him. As superintendent of the Lemoore city waterworks he has shown a mechanical ability and a soundness of judgment that has saved hundreds of dollars for the taxpayers and maintained the water plant always in condition for maximum service. He was born in Warren county, Illinois, on the 23d day of August, 1867, and was reared and educated in that locality. He learned the trade of an iron-moulder and followed that vocation about fifteen years. In 1895 he went to Iowa, where he followed farming for four years, raising corn chiefly and at times selling his product as low as ten cents per bushel. In 1900 Mr. Flaherty came to California, locating in Hanford, where he established an iron foundry and machine shop, which he opera-fed– for two years. Going then to the west side, he engaged in farming, but later disposed of that property and for the past thirteen years has been superintendent of the waterworks.

He was married to Miss Carrie Summers, who was born and reared in Rockford, Illinois, and to them have been born four children, namely :

Mrs. William Preston of Burbank, California ; George, who is a student in the Lemoore high school, and one of the best athletes ever turned out by that school, having gained a high reputation in basketball and football; Caroline, who is a student in a business college at Stockton, California ; and Robert. Mr. Flaherty is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and of the Woodmen of the World. He is a plain, unassuming man, straightforward in all his dealings with his fellowmen, and he deservedly stands high in the estimation of all who know him.

H.   S. BRIETIGAM.

One of the most important and successful farmers organizations in Kings county is the Farm Bureau Exchange, of which H. S. Brietigam is the active manager, and to his sound judgment and energetic administra­tion of its affairs is due the splendid success which has characterized it. Mr. Brietigam was born in Lawrence, Dayton county, Kansas, on the 13th day of July, 1886, and when six years of age was brought by his ,parents to California. He received his education in the public schools of Los Angeles and upon taking up the active duties of life he began work as a hotel clerk, being employed in hotels in Los Angeles and Stockton. For a time he operated a railroad hotel in Lassen county, California, and the Concordia Hotel at Red Bluff. Going then to San Francisco, he joined the circulation department of the Bulletin but soon afterward engaged in the laundry business in that city. In 1915 he came to Kings county, locat­ing in the Island district, northwest of Lemoore. Soon afterward he organized a cooperative movement among the farmers of leased lands adjoining each other, comprising about two hundred and fifty acres, and of this he was chosen manager. Later he organized the Milo Maize Growers, another cooperative association embracing the farmers of the west side, in the Corcoran district of Kings county. For two years Mr. Brietigam was manager of the feed and grain warehouse of the Deacon Lumber Company, at Lemoore. On January 1, 1923, he became manager of the Kings County Farm Bureau Exchange, with headquarters in Hanford. This is a cooperative growing and selling organization, embracing sixty grain growers, and Mr. Brietigam is now engaged in the marketing of their products. In 1923 he disposed of forty thousand tons of grapes for the growers of this district. The officers of the Kings County Farm Bureau Exchange are as follows : President, W. L. Hagg; vice presi­dent, J. W. Arthur ; manager, H. S. Brietigam ; directors, H. L. Heffner, G. R. Jones, R. F. Schmizer, W. C. Watson, W. Weis, H. G. Stedde and L. W. Clawson.

Mr. Brietigam is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He was married to Miss Edna Downie, of Salt Lake City, and they are the parents of a son, George. Everything pertaining to the welfare of the community receives the earnest consideration of Mr. Brietigam, who is public spirited and enterprising and withholds his support from no worthy movement. Genial and approachable, he easily makes friends and holds the goodwill of the entire community.

HERBERT M. BAILEY.

Among the active younger members of the representative business men of Lemoore, specific mention should be made of Herbert M. Bailey, who is the energetic and efficient agent of the Shell Oil Company for Lemoore, Armona and Stratford. Mr. Bailey was born at Lemoore on the 18th of June, 1899, and received his elementary education in the public schools of this city, being a graduate of the high school. He then entered the University of California, at Berkeley, from which he was graduated in 1923 with the degree of bachelor of arts. While in the university Mr. Bailey took a prominent part in all college activities and was a member of the Sigma Nu Greek-letter fraternity. In athletics he was especially prominent and was a member of the varsity boat crew in his senior year.

Since becoming identified with business affairs in Lemoore he has not only been successful in his own line but has given earnest support to every movement for the betterment of the city and the advancement of the public welfare. He took a prominent part in the Chamber of Com­merce drive in 1925 and is a persistent and effectual booster for Lemoore on every possible occasion. He is a member of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Genial and companionable, though modest and unassuming, he easily makes friends and is well liked through­out the circle of his acquaintance.

CLARK & BECKETT.

Among the prosperous and up-to-date industries of Corcoran specific mention should be made of the successful and progressive concern known a the Clark & Beckett Creamery, which, since 1919, has been located on the Dairy road, south of this city. Messrs. Clark and Beckett are specialists in the dairy and ice cream business, both having had long experience in these lines, and they are achieving a success as gratifying as it is deserved. Mr. Beckett has been engaged in dairy work practically since his boyhood days and is the active manager of the Corcoran plant. There is in connection a farm of three hundred and twenty acres, on which they keep one hundred and fifty hogs and the dairy itself is of ninety-cow capacity. Prior to locating the plant here, Mr. Beckett looked over practically the entire state of California, but for various reasons selected Corcoran as the best all-around dairy section in the state and his judgment has been abundantly verified in his opinion since they established the plant here.

In connection with the Corcoran plant, Messrs. Clark and Beckett are majority stockholders in the Bothell Creamery Company, of Los Angeles, extensive manufacturers of ice cream, and to supply the latter concern a fleet of refrigerator trucks operates between Corcoran and Los Angeles. Fifty thousand dollars is represented in the Los Angeles plant and thirty thousand dollars in the creamery at Corcoran.

Before joining Mr. Beckett in the creamery business here, Mr. Clark had been in Mr. Beckett’s employ at Los Angeles. He is a very capable, energetic and reliable man. Mr. Bothell, who is one of the best informed creamery men in the country, was in the employ of the government in Washington and Oregon for a number of years before becoming allied with Messrs. Clark and Beckett. Altogether the combination is a peculiarly strong one and one that insures success in any undertaking to which they may apply themselves.

R. H. CHAUNCEY.

The commercial history of Kings county would be incomplete were there failure to make specific mention of those who have by their industry and enterprising business methods contributed to the prosperity of this section of the state. Among this number is R. H. Chauncey, who has made a splendid record as manager of the Los Angeles Creamery Com­pany at Hanford. Mr. Chauncey was born in Olney, Illinois, on the 28th of December, 1891, and in the public schools of that locality acquired his early education. On completing his public school course he entered Purdue University at Lafayette, Indiana, where he took the regular course in dairying, with the production end especially in view, supplementing this by a similar course in the University of Illinois. All his labor since then has been confined to the creamery business and he is generally recognized as an expert in his line. After completing his technical studies, Mr. Chauncey entered the employ of the Olney Produce Company, at Olney, his work being confined to the creamery department, and later he went to work on the dairy farm of R. Stocker, at Green Bay, Wisconsin.

During the World war Mr. Chauncey was in the military service for two years, of which eighteen months were spent in France. He was trained at camps in Mississippi and Kentucky and was assigned to the infantry branch of the Twenty-eighth Division, and after his return to this country he was discharged at Rockford, Illinois. In 1919 Mr. Chaun­cey came to California, going at once to Los Angeles, where he obtained employment in the butter department of the Los Angeles Creamery Com­pany. This company had also established a plant at Hanford and in 1921 Mr. Chauncey was sent here to take charge of it. This is the oldest creamery in Kings county, having been established about twenty-five years ago, and has been operated by the Los Angeles company for nine years. Some seven hundred producers furnish the cream for the plant, which turns out three thousand pounds of butter daily, the production being shipped entirely to Los Angeles wholesale dealers.

Mr. Chauncey is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the American Legion, all at Olney, Illinois, as well as the Kiwanis Club of Hanford. He was married to Miss Margaret Wolcott, who was born and reared in Indianapolis, Indiana, and they have a son, Horrall. Earnest purpose and tireless energy, combined with mature judgment and everyday common sense, have been among his most prominent characteristics and he has merited the respect and esteem which are accorded him by all who know him.

CECIL FRIEND.

Although comparatively young in years, the subject of this sketch has demonstrated in no uncertain way that what he lacks in length of ex­perience is more than made up by sound judgment, industrious habits and progressive methods, so that today he occupies a high position among the successful and enterprising business men of Lemoore, Kings county, California.

Cecil Friend is a native son of the city in which he now lives, having been born here on the 26th of September, 1900. He was reared at home and secured his education in the public schools, having graduated from the high school. He then attended the University of California and in 1920 he returned to Lemoore and started in the transfer and hauling business for himself. By giving prompt service and performing all jobs in a conscientious and satisfactory manner, he soon won the confidence and good will of the people and his business has steadily grown from the beginning, until today he commands the major part of the business in his line.

In May, 1924, he started doing business under the name of “Friend Service, Ice-Fuel-Transfer.” By introducing rural ice service as well as city, his ice business has grown until in August, 1925, he finished the construction of a cold storage plant, containing rooms for ice storage, eggs and vegetables, chilling room for meat and two hundred individual cold storage boxes for the farmer to freeze his products for his own consumption months afterwards. He operates five large trucks and makes a specialty of heavy hauling, such as live stock, hay, machinery and other heavy material. He also carries a stock of coal and wood, which he sells to local consumers. No job is too difficult for him to tackle and the character of the service he has rendered has given him marked pres­tige in the community.

Personally, Mr. Friend is a man of excellent habits and genial and companionable disposition and has won and retains a host of loyal friends. He was married to Miss Myldred Hannah, of Lemoore, and they have a daughter, Betty Leigh, aged five years.

ALEXANDER R. ANDERSON, JR., D. V. M.

In the front rank of Kings county’s professional men, possessing a thoroughly disciplined mind and keeping in close touch with the trend of modern thought relative to his calling, stands Dr. Alexander R. Anderson, Jr., a successful veterinary surgeon of Hanford. Dr. Anderson was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on the 12th of May, 1898. While he was still a child, the family moved to Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and in the schools of that city he secured his elementary education. He was then a cadet student at the noted Culver Military Academy, at Culver, Indiana. Having decided to devote his life to the practice of veterinary surgery, he then entered the Grand Rapids Veterinary College, at Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he was graduated in 1918, standing second in his class. To him also belongs the honor of having been the youngest practicing veterinary surgeon in the United States. During the World war, the Doctor enlisted and was commissioned a first lieutenant in the veterinary service, being stationed at Camp Greenburg, Georgia, from May, 1918, to December, 1919. He then entered. upon the practice of his profession at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, but in 1920 he went to Fresno, California, and formed a professional partnership with Dr. McKenna, the county veterinarian of Fresno county. He was made field deputy and milk inspector for that county and was also appointed meat inspector for the city of Fresno. In 1922 Dr. Anderson came to Hanford and estab­lished the Hanford Veterinary Hospital, which is considered one of the finest small veterinary hospitals in the state for animal inspection. Dr. Anderson enjoys a large general practice and has an especially large practice in the treatment of dogs, which are brought to him from all over the central part of the San Joaquin valley. He is the official veterinarian for the Raisin Belt Kennel Club, as he is also for the Hanford District Raisin Belt Kennel Club. He is a lover of dogs and owns one of the finest bird dogs in the state of California. The Doctor is very fond of hunting and appreciates the qualities of a good hunting dog.

Dr. Anderson is a member of Hanford Lodge No. 1259, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the American Legion, the Forty and Eight, the San Joaquin Valley Veterinary Association, the California State Veter­inary Association and the Hanford Kiwanis Club, and he is assistant scoutmaster of the Boy Scouts for Kings county. In 1918 Dr. Anderson was married to Miss Clarabel Crawford, who was born and reared at Grand Rapids, Michigan. The Doctor has been very successful in his professional work since coming to Hanford and by his genial manner, public spirit and active interest in the community welfare has earned the high place which he holds in public esteem.

ALEXANDER S. KRAMER

For more than fifty years Alexander S. Kramer, one of Tulare county’s best known citizens and most substantial landowners, has been a resident of the Earlimart neighborhood and he thus has been a witness to the amazing development that has been brought about there and throughout this section of the valley during the past half century and more. One of the homesteaders in this county, Mr. Kramer brought his original land holdings up to a high state of development and improvement, and as his affairs prospered he gradually added to these holdings until now he is the owner of about a thousand acres of choice valley land. From the beginning of his agricultural operations here he gave particular attention to sheep raising, a line which he has kept up, long having been recognized as one of the leading sheep men hereabout, and at times his flocks have numbered no fewer than ten thousand. Diligent in his own affairs, Mr. Kramer has acquired a quite substantial estate, for many years being regarded as one of the county’s most dependable citizens. He also has done well his part in the public service and when in 1907 the county grand jury found it necessary to appoint a committee to have charge of the erection of a much needed addition to the courthouse he was made the chairman of that committee and in that capacity rendered a real public service. An ardent republican, Mr. Kramer has for many years taken an active and helpful interest in local political affairs, is one of the leaders of his party in this county, and in 1902 he was a delegate to the state convention of that party which nominated Dr. Pardee for the office of gov­ernor. A member of the Masonic order for many years, Mr. Kramer has the high honor of being an honorary life member of the association of Masonic Veterans of the Pacific Coast, a distinction of no mean quality and a convincing attestation of the high esteem in which he is held in that fraternity.

Alexander S. Kramer is a native of the old Keystone State and a member of one of the sterling old colonial families of Dutch stock that gave such a distinctive quality to the social order in many sections of Pennsylvania during settlement days and which persists in certain sections there to this day. He was born in the city of Norristown, Montgomery county, in the eastern part of Pennsylvania, August 23, 1853, a son of Jacob and Levina (Sames) Kramer, both members of old families of the Pennsylvania Dutch stock in that part of the state. Jacob Kramer was a well to do citizen of Norristown and when the Civil war came on he went out as a soldier of the Union in one of the Pennsylvania regiments. His father, whose name likewise was Jacob was a soldier of the War of 1812 and the latter’s father, also Jacob, was a soldier of the patriot army during the war of the Revolution. Reared at Norristown, A. S. Kramer had his initial schooling there and he has ever retained a pleasant recollection of the fact that his first school teacher was the mother of General Winfield Scott Hancock, she by that time being well along in years and nearing the close of a long term of useful teaching service. Mr. Kramer supplemented his local schooling by two years of study at Muhlenburg College, Allentown, Pennsylvania, and then served an apprenticeship to the stone­cutter’s trade, becoming an experienced worker in stone, and was thus engaged until he had attained his majority, when he wisely decided to come to California.

It was in the spring of 1874 that Mr. Kramer arrived in California. For a few months thereafter he worked at his trade as a stonecutter in San Francisco and then he came to the conclusion that the real wealth and the real opportunities for a young man lay in the land. After some investigation he homesteaded a tract of land in what is now the Earlimart neighborhood, then known as Alila, in Tulare county, and settled down to prove up on the place. After he had acquired title to the land he extended his operations by buying an adjacent tract and in 1878 began raising sheep, a line in which he became quite successful. After his marriage in the fall of 1889 he established his home on this place and has ever since resided here, in the meantime developing a fine piece of property and creating one of the most pleasant home establishments in the whole region. As noted above, Mr. Kramer now has approximately a thousand acres of land and is still actively engaged in the sheep business, making this latter phase of his agricultural operations his chief interest.

It was on October 16, 1889, in Tulare county, that A. S. Kramer was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Francis Zimmermann, who had come here with her parents from San Francisco about three years prior to that date, the Zimmermanns becoming substantial pioneers of the Earlimart neighborhood. Mrs. Kramer was born in the city of San Francisco, a daughter of Henry and Eliza (Widemann) Zimmermann, the latter of whom was a daughter of John Widemann, a native of Germany and one of the California ‘49ers, who became a prominent merchant in San Francisco in settlement days. Henry Zimmermann, who established his home in Tulare county in 1886, came into California in 1852 and thus had a part in pioneer development work in this state. Mr. and Mrs. Kramer have three sons : Alexander Jacob, Clarence A. and Herbert H. Kramer. The last named takes an active part in the operations of the home place. All three were graduated from the high school and had a course in Heald’s Business College. The two elder sons are veterans of the World war. Alexander J. Kramer, who is now making his home at Bakersfield,

vice overseas. Clarence A. Kramer, who also is now living at Bakersfield, was a student in California University when this country took a hand in the World war in 1917. He left the university to enlist and was assigned to service in the navy as a radio electrician.

The Kramers are republicans and have ever taken an interested and helpful part in local civic affairs. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kramer have from time to time served as trustees of the local school board and each has served as secretary of that board. Both are members of the Delano chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, Mrs. Kramer being twice past matron of the chapter and Mr. Kramer thrice past patron. He is a past worshipful master of Delano Lodge No. 309, F. and A. M., is a Knight Templar (York Rite) Mason, connected with the commandery at Visalia, and he is also a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with Islam temple at San Francisco. By reason of his many years of active service in the Masonic fraternity Mr. Kramer in 1906 was made an honorary life member of the Masonic Veterans of the Pacific Coast, as has been noted above. In point of continuous residence Mr. and Mrs. Kramer very properly may lay claim to the distinction of being the “deans” of the Earlimart community, the seniors of the original homesteaders now living there. Mrs. Kramer homesteaded a tract of land in the adjacent county of Kern when she came here as a young woman with her parents in the middle ‘80s and thus knows all about the trials of pioneer life, both she and her husband having many interesting stories to tell of those days of development.

JOSHUA GRIFFITH, M. D.

In many respects one of the strongest and most remarkable charac­ters in the early history of the San Joaquin valley was Dr. Joshua Grif­fith, to whom the valley is greatly indebted for his enterprising efforts to make improvements and to encourage others in their efforts to up- build this section of the state. For many years his name was a household word throughout this section and he died beloved and respected by all who knew him. -

Joshua Griffith was born June 16, 1800, in Red Stone Fort, near Cadiz, Ohio. In his boyhood he was denied the privileges of a school education, but was naturally of a studious disposition and through his own efforts became a well informed man, having all his life been a careful reader and a close observer of men and events. In 1820 he “emigrated to West Virginia and in 1822 he joined the Ashley expedition to the Missouri river, being one of the sixty men who comprised that historic group of explorers. In 1824 Joshua Griffith made ‘the trip to New Mexico, locating in Santa Fe, where he engaged in business. In 1830 he went to Sonora and in the following year to Hermosillo, Mexico, where again he opened a store. In 1848 he moved to Los Angeles. From the time he was twenty-four years of age he had applied himself closely to the study of medicine and had practiced that science whenever oppor­tunity presented itself. From Los Angeles he went to Amador, where he engaged in mining in company with Washington Jackson, one of the well known mining explorers of that day. On November 15, 1848, Dr. Griffith discovered the celebrated Jackson Creek region. In 1850 he located in Merced, where he made his permanent home. He went to Santa Cruz and bought chickens and seed wheat, and corn, which he brought to his new home in the San Joaquin valley, and was the first to plant these grains in this valley, he having paid $150 for one sack of wheat. Also in 1853 he established the first flowing well in the valley. In the flood of 1861-2 his property was swept away, but he rebuilt and lived here, honored and respected by the entire community, until his death, which occurred in 1905. In 1854 he built a grist mill, sending to New York for the burrs and he packed them to the valley on pack mules.

A. B. BELKNAP.

A. B. Belknap has spent practically his entire life within the borders of Kings county, and his commendable efforts have benefited himself and the community alike, for he has always had deeply at heart the well being of his locality. He is the scion of an excellent old pioneer family and has always stood earnestly for the best things in the community life. Mr. Belknap was born in Lemoore on the 25th of August, 1891, the son of J. W. and Pauline (Gonzales) Belknap, the former a native of Missouri and the latter born and reared in Alameda, California. J. W. Belknap came to California in the early ‘80s and for many years was engaged in ranching, in which he met with fine success. He is now retired from active business and is living at Lemoore, where he is the owner of the Belknap building. To him and his wife were born two children : Wesley, who died at the age of nineteen years ; and the subject of this review.

A. B. Belknap was graduated from the high school at Lemoore, after which he took a course in Heald’s Business College. He then entered the Bank of Lemoore, now the First National Bank of Lemoore, and has re­mained with that institution since 1912 with the exception of two years when he was away from the bank because of ill health. When, in April, 1919, the Stratford Branch of the First National Bank of Lemoore was opened, Mr. Belknap came from the head office as manager and in this capacity he has continued to the present time.

Mr. Belknap was married to Miss Vera Lung, a native of Nebraska, who was a bookkeeper and accountant prior to her marriage. They are the parents of two children : James and Marie Pauline. Mrs. Belknap takes an active interest in church work and is president of the Ladies Aid Society of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Belknap is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen of the World, a charter member of the secretary of the Stratford Chamber of Commerce and is a deacon of the Presbyterian church. He is public-spirited and a stanch advocate of every movement which tends to the betterment of the community.

PETER COLL

Among the honored and respected citizens of Lemoore who, beginning life under the most humble circumstances but endowed with courage, de­termination and a willingness to work, eventually succeeded in the ambition to become independent, the name of Peter Coli stands prominent. He was born at Arona, Spain, and was reared and educated in his native land. He came to the United States at the age of twenty-eight years and arrived at Visalia, Tulare county, in 1888 with a cash capital of eighty cents. Nothing daunted, he immediately sought work and accepted anything that was offered. He herded sheep in the mountains back of Porterville, cut timber, worked in the Lucerne vineyards, bought and sold hides, shot coyotes and wildcats and herded sheep on the Jacobs ranch. He killed over six hundred of the wild animals for which he received the state bounty of five dollars a head. He was employed for a while on the Valley railroad near Corcoran and then was employed by Dr. Musgrave in Hanford. At length, having carefully husbanded his funds, Mr. Coli opened a grocery store in Lemoore and has been successful in that business from the start, covering a period of over eighteen years. He carries a large and well selected stock of groceries and kindred lines and because of his courteous manner and efforts to please his customers he enjoys a large patronage. As he has prospered he has wisely invested his money and is now, the owner of some valuable real estate in Lemoore.

Mr. Coli is a member of the Portuguese lodge, I. D. E. S. He takes a deep interest in the welfare of the community and gives his support to every movement tending to promote the well being or stimulate the growth of the city. Modest and unassuming, he enjoys the respect and esteem of all who know him.

C. C.    CROW.

 In tracing the biography of the influential business man and repre­sentative citizen whose name introduces this sketch, it is clearly evident that the prosperity which he enjoys has been won by sheer ability and industry, and he is therefore eminently deserving of the high position he occupies in the esteem of the community. C. C. Crow was born January 7, 1878, in Stockton, California, and is the son of Walter and Pennsylvania (Haas) Crow. After completing his studies in the public schools he entered the University of California, from which he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1903. He then went to Schenectady, New York, and spent a year and a half in the shops of the General Electric Company, where he gained much valuable experience. He had specialized as an electrical engineer, and going to New York city he entered the employ of the New York Telephone Company, with whom he remained two years. During this latter period he took postgraduate work under Steinmetz, who during his life was generally recognized as one of the world’s foremost electrical engineers, and also took postgraduate work in that science in Columbia University. Mr. Crow then returned to Kings county and during the following twelve years gave his attention to farming and fruit raising, in which he met with splendid success. In 1921 he became a partner in the firm of Crow & Railsback, at Hanford, and opened an automobile electric service station, obtaining the agency for Willard automobile batteries. The firm has been prosperous from the start and now gives employment to four men, whose full time is occupied in caring for the large and steadily increasing business. They specialize in electric equipment for Dodge, Chevrolet, Overland and Studebaker cars and have earned a high reputation because of the careful and painstaking manner in which they handle all jobs entrusted to them.

Fraternally Mr. Crow belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons, in which he has attained the rank of a Knight Templar, and is a member of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine and also of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is fond of outdoor sports, hunting and fishing being his favorite forms of recreation. Personally Mr. Crow possesses to a marked degree those qualities which attract men and he is deservedly popular in the circles in which he moves. He gives earnest support to every movement looking to the betterment of the community welfare and is numbered among the progressive and enterprising men of Hanford. Mr. Crow was married to Miss Katherine Murphy, who was born and reared in Stockton, California.

ROY H. MARTIN.

One of the veterans of the World war who since returning to civil life has taken an active part in affairs relating to the community welfare is Roy H. Martin, the present efficient constable of Lucerne township, Kings county. Mr. Martin is a native of Kings county, having been born in Hanford on the 23d of January, 1894. He is the son of Allen H. and Elizabeth (Martin) Martin, who were in no way related prior to their marriage. His father was a pioneer of California and passed through all the vicissitudes and dangers of early life in this state. He had served in the Union army throughout the Civil war and on his discharge from military service started for the “Golden West”, arriving in this state May 5, 1866. In 1874 he came to Hanford, where he is still living, at the advanced age of over eighty-three years. Elizabeth Martin is a native of California, having been born in San Benito county, and she was married in Lemoore. Her parents were pioneers, crossing the plains by team and afterward taking an active part in the affairs of those early days.

Roy H. Martin received a good public school education and for a time after reaching mature years was engaged in drilling wells. Later he was employed as an assistant to the county surveyor, under whose direc­tion he studied civil engineering, in which he became very competent and which vocation he followed for some time. For two years Mr. Martin was a member of the motor traffic squad, in. which he gained a fine repu­tation as a careful and efficient officer. He also served as deputy sheriff of Kings county and in 1922 was elected to a four-year term as constable of Lucerne township. Prior to his election to the latter office, however, Mr. Martin had seen some strenuous service overseas with the American Expeditionary Forces, acquitting himself with honor. His first military service was on the Mexican border as a member of Company M of the Second California Regiment. Upon the advent of the United States into the great European struggle he was sent overseas with Company B, Supply Train, Ninety-first Division, with which command he experienced much severe activity on the front of the fighting line, holding the rank of corporal during the last fourteen months of his service. He actively participated in the St. Mihiel drive, the terrific struggle in the Argonne woods and the engagements at the Lys and Scheldt.

Politically the democratic party commands his support and he takes an active interest in local public affairs. He is a member of the American Legion and he is an ardent supporter of every movement or enterprise that promises to advance the public welfare. Because of his upright life and splendid record he enjoys to a marked degree the goodwill of his fellowmen.

THOMPSON N. SPEAR.

This representative and highly esteemed citizen of Hanford, Kings county, has been distinctively the architect of his own fortunes,---has- been true and loyal in all the relations of life and stands as a type of that sterling manhood which ever commands respect and honor. Thompson N. Spear was born on a farm in Connecticut on the 7th of April, 1888, and is the son of L. D. and Virginia (Thompson) Spear. The father is a successful farmer and he and his wife are still residing on the old homestead. The subject of this sketch received a good public school education and the years of his young manhood were spent on the paternal farmstead. When he attained his majority he started out on his own account, going to Texas, where he remained for a short time, and in the same year, 1909, he came to California, locating first at Coalinga, where he obtained employment in the oil field. He was so employed until 1915, when he and his brother, E. R. Spear, took the agency for the Dodge automobile at Coalinga. This enterprise proved so successful that the following year they came to Hanford and opened here as Dodge dealers. Their territory thus embraces Kings county and the west end of Fresno county. They employ fourteen men and have made a splendid record in the selling of this well known car. Careful and conservative and thoroughly reliable in their dealings with the public, they have earned a splendid reputation among the enterprising business men of this section of the state. Spear Brothers have recently erected a fine modern brick building for their own business and in connection they have a well equipped machine shop for repair work.

Mr. Spear’s political affiliation is with the republican party and he is keenly interested in the general trend of public affairs, although not in any sense a politician. He is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and of the Kiwanis Club of Hanford. He is fond of golf and enjoys the companionship of friends, being a genial and large hearted man whom it is a pleasure to meet. Mr. Spear was married to Miss Vera Coleman, a native of Pennsylvania, and they have two children, Winifred and Thompson, Jr.

J.   E. MOORE.

Among those men of earnest purpose, upright life and persistent industry who have contributed their quota to the development of Kings county, none stands higher in the esteem of the people of their respective localities than does J. E. Moore, merchant and postmaster at Hardwick. Mr. Moore is a native of Pennsylvania, where he was born on the 12th of March, 1870. He is the son of John N. and Elizabeth (Kelly) Moore, both of whom were members of prominent old Pennsylvania families. Mr. Moore comes of a long line of sterling ancestors, running back to the Plymouth colony in New England.

J.   E. Moore was reared on his father’s farm and secured a good education in the public schools. In young manhood he began clerking in stores and followed that line of work in Pennsylvania, Buffalo and Chicago up to 1897, when he came to California. Locating at San Francisco he obtained a clerical position with the Southern Pacific railroad and was also, later, a clerk in the post office at San Francisco. In 1911 Mr. Moore came to Hardwick and engaged in the mercantile business, in which he has met with splendid success. He carries a large and well selected stock of goods, gives courteous attention to every customer who enters his store and enjoys a large trade from a large radius of territory surrounding Hardwick. In 1917 Mr. Moore was appointed postmaster at Hardwick and is still holding that office. He is a wide-awake and energetic man, who, though advancing his own interests, is not neglectful of his duties to the community and gives hearty support to every movement for the advancement of the town along all legitimate lines.

In 1900 Mr. Moore was married to Miss Loda Burner, who was born and reared near Carrville, Trinity county, California. By this marriage they had two daughters, Grace Dorethy Moore and Marjorie Lela Moore.

An estrangement and separation followed in 1920, and later a divorce. In 1923 Mr. Moore met and married Mrs. Ida Emory, of San Jose, Cali­fornia, who was formerly Miss Ida Rowe. She was born near San Juan, California, and attended a school in San ‘Juan canyon. She is a descendant of the noted Twitchell family of San Juan canyon. Mr. and Mrs. Moore are members of the Presbyterian church of Hanford. Mr. Moore is a member of the Independent Order Odd Fellows and he and his wife are members of the Lady of the Lake Rebekah Lodge of Hanford, California. They reside in Hardwick, this state.

JOHN JOSEPH WALKER.

An enumeration of those men who have won honor and public recognition for themselves, and at the same time have honored the com­munity where they belong, would be incomplete were there failure to make mention of John J. Walker, the present efficient under sheriff of Kings county. He was born in Alexander, Louisiana, on the 17th of March, 1877, and is the son of Jacob and Loretta (Rey) Walker. The father died in 1881 and is still survived by his widow, who came to California in 1908 and is now living at Burbank.

John J. Walker is largely a self-educated man, for his public school training was abbreviated from the fact that in boyhood it was neces­sary for him to go to work. His first employment was as office boy in a large establishment and his ambition was early evidenced from the fact that, going beyond his required duties, he applied himself to the study of bookkeeping under the kind of direction of the regular book­keeper. As soon as he was financially able, young Walker attended a business college, and so advanced was he in his knowledge of accounts that at the end of five weeks he was granted a diploma. He then was continued in the employ of the company as a manager of stores. The firm imported and exported cotton and Mr. Walker became a recognized expert in his knowledge of staple cotton. In 1911, because of poor health, Mr. Walker came to California and for two years was employed in a store in Los Angeles. He then came to Hanford as manager for Reese & Durant Company, wholesalers, with whom he remained for about four years. Having recovered his health, Mr. Walker then re­turned east and for two years was engaged in the buying of cotton. In January, 1918, he again came to Hanford and became under sheriff of the county, under Sheriff Hime. He has had no cause to regret the change nor have the people of the county had any cause to regret. his selection for the office, for he has brought to the discharge of his duties a steadfast desire to give the best service of which he is capable. Careful and obliging, he has won a well deserved popularity and those who know him best like him most.

Mr. Walker was married to Miss Norma Guirard, of St. Martin, Louisiana, and to them was born a child, now Mrs. Hazel Walker Burr, who is the mother of a son, John Douglas Burr. Politically Mr. Walker is a stanch republican, while fraternally he is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the Woodmen of the World. He is deeply interested in all athletic sports and especially enjoys good boxing as one of the best forms of physical culture. He is essentially public-spirited and gives his support to every movement for the advancement of the community welfare.

CLYDE EDMOND DENHAM.

In one of the most exacting of all callings the subject of this sketch has attained distinction, being recognized as one of the most successful educators in his section of the state. Clyde Edmond Denham was born in Lodi, California, in August, 1884, and is a son of Rollin Henry and Ella (Stephens) Denham. Rollin H. Denham, who was a native of Iowa, first came to California in 1873 and located at San Diego, which at that early date was but little more than an Indian village. Though but a boy at that time, he was deeply interested in the new country and realized that there was a wonderful future in store for southern California. He next located in Sonoma county and eventually went to Lodi. In the meantime he had made several trips back to his native state. After engaging in farming for a time near Turlock he came to Tulare county in the early ‘nineties, later moving to Delano, Kern county. Then for a time he was engaged in the lumber business in the mountains, but in 1899 finally located in the San Joaquin valley.

Clyde E. Denham received his elementary education in the mountain schools and then in the Kings River school, graduating in 1902. He then attended the high school at Hanford, from which he was graduated in 1906. Having determined to make teaching his life work, Mr. Denham entered the San Jose Teachers College, where he was graduated in Decem­ber, 1908. His first engagement as a school teacher was in the Summerset district, where he remained for one year. This was followed by two years in the Paddock district, two years in the Cross Creek district and five years at Gramsville. During these years he had become well and favor­ably known as a successful educator and the logical outcome was his selection to the responsible position of district superintendent Or schools at Hanford, which position he has filled for the past five years, to the eminent satisfaction of the patrons of the district. He is a well educated, symmetrically developed man, of scholarly tastes and studious habits, and keeps abreast of the times in advanced educational methods, while his general knowledge is broad and comprehensive. Genial and unassuming in manner, he has won many warm and loyal friends since demonstrating

his capability and fitness for his life work and is numbered among the rep­resentative men of the community.

Mr. Denham was married to Miss Mary Hicks, who was born and reared in Granville, Iowa, and to their union have been born two children, Rollin H. and Maurice Robert. Mr. Denham is a member of the county board of education and is deeply interested in everything pertaining to the educational, moral or material welfare of the community with which he is identified. He gives his support to the republican party and i8 a member of the Woodmen of the world. He is an ardent advocate of outdoor life, and walking, hunting and fishing are his favorite recreations.

J.   LARRY SMITH.

J.   Larry Smith has been identified with journalistic interests in Kings county as editor of the Hanford Morning Journal since 1916. He was born in Austin, now a part of Chicago, Illinois, on the 2d of August, 1877, his parents being Anthony Wayne and Elizabeth Christina (Lyon) Smith. The father, a civil engineer by profession, served with the rank of major in the Union army during the period of strife between the north and the south, and after cessation of hostilities was connected with the department of public works in the city of Chicago. He also engaged in deep foundation work and conceived the idea of sinking caissons to bed rock for the Chicago skyscrapers. The last years of his life were spent in honorable retirement in California and it was in this state that he passed away in February, 1924. He had for a number of years survived his wife, who departed this life on the 6th of November, 1910.

J.   Larry Smith obtained his early education in the public schools of Chicago and subsequently pursued a high school course at Oak Park, Illinois. When still but a boy he entered the service of an optical goods manufacturing firm, with which he continued until 1903, representing the concern in Chicago, Illinois, in California and also in Honolulu. He was a young man of twenty-four years when he arrived in California on the 12th of September, 1901, and made his way to Hanford. Mr. Smith afterward lived in other parts of the state but eventually returned to Han­ford and on the 1st of January, 1907, turned his attention to newspaper work in connection with the Hanford Morning Journal, of which he has been editor since 1916. In this capacity he has directed public opinion in no inconsiderable degree, for it is conceded that in the production and conservation of advancement in all the normal lines of human progress there is no factor which has exercised a more potent influence than the press.

In Hanford, California, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Emma Lee Bowden, a native of Virginia. Their children are four in number, namely : Eloise Constance, Virginia Dare, Beatrice Elizabeth and Laurence Wayne.

In politics Mr. Smith maintains an independent attitude, believing that the qualifications of a candidate are of more importance than his party affiliation. He is a member of the Kiwanis Club and for recreation he turns to clean outdoor sports, being particularly fond of fishing. He is also an enthusiastic baseball fan and for the past three years has served as secretary of the San Joaquin Valley Baseball League. Mr. Smith has a wide acquaintance in Hanford and Kings county, and the sterling worth of his character has translated acquaintanceship into friendship in almost every case.

HON. J. W. GUIBERSON.

In every county are to be found individuals born to leadership, men who dominate not alone by superior intelligence and natural endowment but also by sheer force of character. Among such persons must be included J. W. Guiberson, who has long been a dominating and influential factor in the affairs of Kings county and the San Joaquin valley. Both his community and his state have been dignified by his noble life and splendid achievements and he stands as an honored member of a striking group of noted men whose influence in the civic and economic life of the state has been of most beneficent order.

Mr. Guiberson was born in Lake county, California, on the 27th of November, 1865, and is the son of Samuel A. and Mary A. (Green) Guiberson. Through the maternal line, he is a direct descendant of General Nathanael Green and General John Stark of Revolutionary fame. Samuel Guiberson was a native of Ohio, and Mary Green, of Missouri. They were members of the same caravan that started across the plains by ox team, en route for California in 1853, and they were married at Fort Laramie, Wyoming. They first located in Lake county, California, where they remained until 1869, when they removed to Fillmore, Ventura county, where Mr. Guiberson became a large land owner and a man of considerable importance, being known over a large radius of country as “Uncle Sam.”

J.   W. Guiberson, after completing his elementary education in the public schools, attended Woodbury’s Business College, and was also an undergraduate of the University of Southern California. He remained in Ventura county until 1905, when he came to Kings county as the rep­resentative of the Security Land & Loan Company, which owned thirty thousand acres of land here, and who laid out the townsite of Goreoran. He built the first house here and engaged in superintending the affairs of the company. In the course of a few years Mr. Guiberson had acquired interests of his own which demanded so much attention that he resigned his position with the land company after seeing to it that their interests here were in good shape. During the subsequent years Mr. Guiberson has been one of the most active men in the county in the promoting of those things which promise to conserve the county’s best interests and he has by universal agreement occupied a place in the front rank of Kings county’s representative men. His interests became so varied and numerous that he incorporated the J. W. Guiberson Company to take over and manage the same as a holding company, of which he is president. He is also president of the National Bank of Corcoran, which is controlled by J. W. Guiberson Company.

Mr. Guiberson was one of the organizers of the Kings County Chamber of Commerce, which he served as vice president and of which .he is now serving his second term as president. He is past president of the Cali­fornia Dairymen’s Association, a past director of the California Cattle­men’s Association, vice president of the California Cotton Growers As­sociation, president of the Corcoran Cotton Growers Association, a director of the Lakeview Creamery Company and secretary-treasurer of Kings Lake Shore Railroad. He was one of fifteen of the San Joaquin Valley Progress Committee, representing Kings county. This later was merged into the San Joaquin Valley Advisory Council of the California Development Association, and Mr. Guiberson is one of the executive committee of that body, consisting of nine members. He is a supporter of the democratic party and represented Kings county one term in the state legislature. During the World war he devoted himself unremittingly to the support of the government in its prosecution of the war and served as chairman of the milk production commission of the food administration for the state of California and traveled to practically every part of the state. He was dollar-a-year man and devoted his time unstintingly to the cause. Mr. Guiberson has always been a strong advocate of the finest possible educational facilities, as is evidenced by his daughters having received the best possible advantages. Hazel, Claire and Edythe have become exceptionally accomplished in music, and Helen was graduated from Mills College and is her father’s assistant cashier in the bank. Mr. Guiberson gives his support unreservedly to the right side of every moral issue. Fraternally he is a Knight Templar Mason and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine at Islam, and also belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks at Hanford and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being a charter member of Corcoran lodge.

Mr. Guiberson was married to Miss Nellie F. Throckmorton, of Illinois, in 1890, and they have become the parents of four children, namely: Hazel, who is the wife of J. W. Stokes, a financier in New York city ; Claire, who is assistant manager and secretary of J. W. Guiberson Company, Inc., past president of the Kings county branch of the Federated Women’s Clubs of California, president of the Thursday Club of Corcoran and a trustee of the Presbyterian church; Helen, who is assistant cashier of the National Bank of Corcoran, and Edythe, who is a graduate of Mills College and is supervisor of music at Fort Bragg, Mendocino county.

Personally, Mr. Guiberson is popular throughout the range of his acquaintance, for his relations with his fellowmen have ever been pleasant and agreeable. Unassuming in manner, he is easily approached, obliging and straightforward in all the relations of life, and he has given to the world the best of an essentially virile and loyal nature.

History of Tulare County California: By Kathleen Edwards Small
History of Kings County, California: By J Larry Smith
Volume 1 - Chicago - The S J Clarke Publishing Co, 1926

Transcribed by: Martha A Crosley Graham, Pages: 501 - 626


Pages Created Created: 28 June 2009

Rights Reserved: 2017

Tulare County Biographies ~ 
Updated: 14 September 2017